Oct 24, 2021

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Social media ‘emboldens’ stalkers to take action, warns expert

By Hannah Devlin Science correspondent
  • However, Farnham said that chronic underfunding and the fact that mental health services were not set up to deal with those suffering from delusional disorders could be adding to the risk of dangerous individuals slipping through the net.
  • Referrals to the clinic, which works with health, probation and prison services, have risen significantly in the past 18 months, Farnham said, after increased social isolation and rising unemployment brought about by the pandemic.
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Thinking like a plumber when adjusting medications

By Hans Duvefelt, MD
  • His metoprolol could cause cold fingers all by itself, or it was at least likely to aggravate Ethan’s symptom, because it constricts blood vessels.
  • The calcium channel blocker nifedipine is routinely used in Raynaud’s but does little for heart rate and could drop his blood pressure too much in combination with his other medications.
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Death and illness from toxic emissions are avoidable. Cop26 must deliver bold action | Sadiq Khan and Maria Neira

By Sadiq Khan and Maria Neira
  • In a week’s time, leaders from around the world will meet at the Cop26 climate conference in Glasgow to try to agree on the vital action we need to protect our planet and to save lives.
  • This action will build on the progress that has been made since the introduction of the world-leading Ulez in central London in 2019, which has already reduced pollution in the zone by nearly half and cut carbon emissions by 6%.
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Sunak refuses to commit to wearing mask in crowded Commons

By Peter Walker Political correspondent
  • Rishi Sunak has refused to commit to wearing a mask inside a crowded House of Commons, as a leading government scientific adviser said ministers were mistaken to believe that vaccinations alone would keep Covid levels under control.
  • The chancellor also reiterated that ministers did not yet believe it was necessary to move to the government’s “plan B” for Covid over the winter, which would reintroduce mandatory mask wearing for crowded spaces, vaccine passports and more home working.
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STI rates ‘at their highest numbers’ in US as Covid dominates health funding

By Gloria Oladipo
  • Health officials in the US are concerned about how to divert key resources to combatting a rise in sexually-transmitted infections (STI) that is now continuing despite the social restrictions of the coronavirus pandemic and is now in its sixth consecutive year of increase.
  • America has continually combatted rising STI rates pre-pandemic, one of many poor public health outcomes in the US, despite massive spending on healthcare.
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Does skipping breakfast increase the risk of an early death? Part I | Open Staff Physician role

By Peter Attia
  • Recently, a group of investigators from Texas Tech University (TTU) claimed their study published in Cancer Causes & Control provides evidence for the benefits of regular breakfast consumption in reducing the risk of all-cause and cancer mortality.
  • In contrast, the TTU study was not randomized, and investigators needed to rely instead on statistics to adjust for all of the differences between groups and isolate their (independent) variable of interest: skipping breakfast.
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Mystery of the environmental triggers for cancer deepens

By Robin McKie
  • Michael Stratton, director of the Wellcome Sanger Institute, said recent results from an international cancer research study – which aimed to pinpoint environmental triggers involved in oeosophageal cancer – indicated current scientific understanding of tumour formation was inadequate.
  • The research – on a type known as oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma – was aimed at uncovering why certain parts of the world suffer extremely high rates of the disease.
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Which protects you more against Covid – vaccination or prior infection? | David Spiegelhalter and Anthony Masters

By David Spiegelhalter and Anthony Masters
  • Between December 2020 and mid-May 2021, when the Alpha variant was dominant, full vaccination reduced the risk of testing positive by an estimated 79%, with little difference between vaccines.
  • Fortunately, the Office for National Statistics has released results from a sophisticated analysis of its Covid-19 infection survey that address this issue.
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COVID-19: Who’s at higher risk of serious symptoms?

  • The risk of developing dangerous symptoms of COVID-19 may be increased in people who are older and also in people of any age who have other serious health problems — such as heart or lung conditions, weakened immune systems, obesity, or diabetes.
  • Other health conditions, such as heart or lung disease, can increase your risk of developing dangerous symptoms if you become infected with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
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Only 8% of UK schools have received air monitors that were promised by government

By Donna Ferguson
  • More than nine in 10 schools are still waiting for airflow monitors, which can reduce the spread of Covid-19, despite the education secretary promising that a third of the units would be delivered by the end of this month.
  • Just 8% of the 300,000 CO 2 monitors the government pledged to send to primary and secondary schools this term have been delivered, a Twitter poll by a primary school headteacher revealed last week.
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‘Darker skies and colder weather provide perfect conditions… for Covid-19 to thrive’

By James Tapper, Robin McKie, Michael Savage and Donna Ferguson
  • Until last week, ministers appeared to be holding the line that although at least 40,000 people a day were testing positive for Covid, vaccinations were restraining the worst effects of the virus, with most of the 900 patients being admitted to hospital each day coming from the ranks of the unvaccinated.
  • But if the health and care services run out of capacity: the system has to either leave people waiting for treatment, or try to reduce demand.
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Leos are most likely to get vaccinated, say Utah officials. Is it written in the stars?

By Poppy Noor
  • E xciting news for people who believe in science enough to want mass vaccination, but not enough to think horoscopes are made up: Utah’s Salt Lake county health department says there’s a big difference in vaccination rates depending on your Zodiac sign.
  • How many people of each Zodiac sign are vaccinated: Salt Lake county did this using anonymized state data.
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The Observer view on the winter crisis facing the NHS | Observer editorial

By Observer editorial
  • Ministers did not always heed their own instructions: their delays in imposing necessary social restrictions, not just in March 2020 but again and again, intensified the intolerable pressures on the NHS, increased the death rate and required longer lockdowns.
  • Excess capacity is at a historical low after a decade of underfunding and a dearth of capital investment; even before the pandemic, NHS hospitals were operating close to full capacity during the quieter summer months and there have been several winters now during which elective treatments have had to be cancelled altogether.
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Breastfeeding May Help Prevent Cognitive Decline

By Neuroscience News
  • The findings, published in Evolution, Medicine and Public Health, suggest that breastfeeding may have a positive impact on postmenopausal women’s cognitive performance and could have long-term benefits for the mother’s brain.
  • A new study led by researchers at UCLA Health has found that women over the age of 50 who had breastfed their babies performed better on cognitive tests compared to women who had never breastfed.
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Spending Time in Nature Promotes Early Childhood Development

By Neuroscience News
  • “ Assessing the association between lifetime exposure to greenspace and early childhood development and the mediation effects of air pollution and noise in Canada: a population-based birth cohort study ” by Ingrid Jarvis et al.
  • Assessing the association between lifetime exposure to greenspace and early childhood development and the mediation effects of air pollution and noise in Canada: a population-based birth cohort study
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How to Nurture Creativity in Your Kids

By Neuroscience News
  • For example, for a child who loves to draw, giving them materials that they might use in their artwork is an example of a reward that will help them stay creative .
  • Some parents may be tempted to reward their children for being creative, which is traditionally defined as producing something that is both new and useful .
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Study Find Links to Genetic Disorders in Walking Patterns

By Neuroscience News
  • “Walking patterns can be a revealing trait of health, but gait symptoms of disorders like Fragile X can escape the naked eye for years until they are visibly noticeable,” said study coauthor Elizabeth Torres, a professor of psychology at Rutgers University-New Brunswick and director of the Sensory Motor Integration Lab.
  • Rutgers researchers have linked the genetic disorders Fragile X and SHANK3 deletion syndrome – both linked to autism and health problems – to walking patterns by examining the microscopic movements of those wearing motion-sensored sneakers.
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Low Protein Diets Could Accelerate Dementia but Amino Acids Can Slow the Progress

By Neuroscience News
  • In a recent study published in Science Advances, Japanese researchers showed that a low protein diet can accelerate brain degeneration in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Dr. Makoto Higuchi from the National Institutes for Quantum Sciences and Technology, one of the lead scientists on the study, explains, “In older individuals, low protein diets are linked to poor maintenance of brain function.
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Fighting Multiple Sclerosis With Cold

By Neuroscience News
  • By studying mice suffering from a model of multiple sclerosis, the research team succeeded in deciphering how exposure to cold pushed the organism to divert its resources from the immune system towards maintaining body heat.
  • Scientists at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) developed this idea to a specific field of medicine: the erroneous activation of the immune system that causes autoimmune diseases.
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UK government paves way to bring in tough ‘plan B’ Covid rules

By Michael Savage, Robin McKie and James Tapper
  • The disclosure comes as senior doctors warn that operations are already being cancelled due to NHS staffing shortages and scientists warn of “a triple whammy” of respiratory illnesses this winter, with Covid, flu and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which causes cold-like symptoms but can be serious for children and older adults.
  • New evidence has emerged that the government is paving the way to implement “plan B” measures in England to combat the spread of Covid-19, amid warnings from health chiefs that a “vortex of pressures” is encircling the NHS.
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Systemic racism and Indigenous deaths in health care

By Benjamin Brookwell
  • The coroner’s primary recommendation regarding the death of Joyce Echaquan was for the government of Quebec to recognize the existence of systemic racism within its institutions and make a commitment to contribute to its elimination.
  • We learn from coroner Kamel’s investigative report that shortly after Joyce arrived at the hospital, she was labeled as a drug addict.
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Good vibrations: tapping in to ASMR

By Sam Parker
  • As for the ASMR creatorsthemselves, many of the most popular have turned it into a full-time career, including creating sponsored videos in which they whisper their way through descriptions of clothing lines and tech products to their hundreds of thousands of listeners, few of whom mind the not-so-subliminal advertising as long as it’s making them feel good.
  • There are six main types of triggers that induce the sensation: sounds (by far the most popular, usually involving soft voices, tapping or scratching); visuals (often gentle swooshing movements, such as paint being mixed); eating (watching and listening to people chew); crushing (the sight of objects like kinetic sand, sponges or slime being compressed) and role-playing (more on which later).
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FDA Says Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine Looks Effective for Young Kids

By LAURAN NEERGAARD and MATTHEW PERRONE / AP
  • Federal health regulators said late Friday that kid-size doses of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine appear highly effective at preventing symptomatic infections in elementary school children and caused no unexpected safety issues, as the U.S. weighs beginning vaccinations in youngsters.
  • In their analysis, FDA scientists concluded that in almost every scenario the vaccine’s benefit for preventing hospitalizations and death from COVID-19 would outweigh any serious potential side effects in children.
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Nurses and shop staff in UK face tide of abuse since end of lockdowns

By James Tapper
  • People in public-facing jobs are facing rising hostility and verbal abuse since the end of the Covid lockdowns, according to organisations which represent them.
  • Half of all shop, transport, restaurant and hotel workers and others dealing regularly with the public have experienced abuse in the past six months, figures from the Institute for Customer Service (ICS) show.
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I knew that was going to happen… The truth about premonitions

By Amelia Tait
  • Some scientists claim that the complex world of quantum physics could be used to explain the paranormal (other scientists say they’re unbelievably wrong.) What can stories like Garrett’s tell us about what we do and don’t know?
  • Although there’s no way of knowing how many people worldwide feel that they “sensed” a loved one’s death before being told, it’s a phenomenon that’s been explored in everything from Star Wars to Downtown Abbey to Kung Fu Panda 2 .
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Public Health Was Radical Once

By Ed Yong
  • As the 20th century progressed, the field moved away from the idea that social reforms were a necessary part of preventing disease and willingly silenced its own political voice.
  • As public health moved into the laboratory, a narrow set of professionals associated with new academic schools began to dominate the once-broad field.
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A 20-year longitudinal study finds little evidence that religiosity leads to greater life satisfaction

By Beth Ellwood
  • However, the 20-year study found no evidence of a causal relationship between the two variables — changes in a person’s level of religiosity were not followed by changes in that same individual’s life satisfaction.
  • Findings from a study published in Personality and Individual Differences revealed a small positive correlation between religiosity and life satisfaction.
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UK facing ‘another lockdown Christmas if we don’t act soon’

By Lucy Campbell
  • Prof Peter Openshaw, a member of the New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group (Nervtag), said case numbers and death rates were currently unacceptable, and re-emphasised the importance of measures such as working from home and mask wearing as part of efforts to control the spread of Covid.
  • The health secretary, Sajid Javid, conceded earlier this week that new cases could reach a record 100,000 a day, but Downing Street insisted there was still spare capacity in the NHS and that “plan B” winter measures, including mandatory use of face masks and working from home guidance, would only be activated if it came under significant pressure.
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Covid testing failures at UK lab ‘should have been flagged within days’

By Ian Sample Science editor
  • One UK researcher who is familiar with Covid testing, but not authorised to speak on the issue, said the problems at Immensa were almost inevitable given the way in which private companies were brought in to build testing capacity.
  • The failure has prompted calls for the government to publish its contract with Immensa, transfer as much testing as possible to NHS and university labs, and establish more stringent oversight of the hundreds of private companies that have rushed into the Covid testing business, often without any track record of delivering critical clinical tests.
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English local health chiefs urge extra Covid measures in break from guidance

By Jamie Grierson
  • Wiseman has written to headteachers in the local authority area recommending they take additional measures at their schools when pupils return from the half-term break, including all adults and pupils wearing face coverings in secondary schools.
  • At least a dozen directors of public health (DPHs) have called on residents in their areas to readopt protective measures such as mask-wearing and working from home.
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The Best CBD Gummies in the UK

By Michael Wright
  • Since 2014, CBDfx has been considered one of the highest quality brands in the world, selling only products with organically grown CBD, extracted exclusively with clean, efficient CO2.
  • These tasty chews feature 50mg of organic, broad spectrum CBD per serving, as well as two effective “superfoods,” turmeric and spirulina.
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Science Saturday: Dispelling the hype of stem cell interventions

By Susan Buckles
  • "Our study highlights a clear need to educate and inform physicians about stem cell and regenerative interventions, to enhance skills in patient-physician shared decision-making and to provide resources for patients," says Zubin Master, Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic bioethicist for Mayo Clinic's Center for Regenerative Medicine .
  • Physicians need more resources, tools and education to counsel patients about emerging stem cell therapies, a study in Mayo Clinic Proceedings concludes.
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When and Why Did Human Brains Decrease in Size 3,000 Years Ago?

By Neuroscience News
  • By studying ants as models to illustrate why brains may increase or decrease in size, the researchers hypothesize that brain shrinkage parallels the expansion of collective intelligence in human societies.
  • “A biological anthropologist and a behavioral ecologist and evolutionary neurobiologist began sharing their thoughts on brain evolution and found bridging research on humans and ants might help identify what is possible in nature,” said co-author Dr James Traniello, from Boston University.
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Common Antidepressant Should No Longer Be Used to Treat People With Dementia

By Neuroscience News
  • The research, led by the University of Plymouth and published in The Lancet, has shown that antidepressant mirtazapine offered no improvement in agitation for people with dementia – and was possibly more likely to be associated with mortality than no intervention at all.
  • Summary: Mirtazapine, an antidepressant commonly prescribed to treat dementia-associated agitation, is no more effective than a placebo and may increase mortality risks, researchers report.
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Technology’s impact on dermatology [PODCAST]

By The Podcast by KevinMD
  • He shares his story and discusses his KevinMD article, “ The evolution of medical training in dermatology and the impact of technology .”
  • As a result, schools and other stakeholder organizations should examine alternative methods of medical training and can use this opportunity to embrace new technologies in order to effectively and efficiently educate trainees.
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People perceive humans, animals, and landscapes that are beautiful as having a higher moral standing

By Beth Ellwood
  • They also reported feeling a stronger desire to protect the beautiful animals, and this effect was mediated by perceptions of purity and usefulness — suggesting that people viewed the beautiful animals as having a higher moral standing than the ugly animals because the more attractive animals were perceived to have greater purity and utility.
  • Study authors Christoph Klebl and his colleagues wanted to explore an additional mechanism that might explain how people ascribe moral standing to entities that are non-sentient, such as buildings and landscapes.
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Former vaccine chief will return to NHS role amid concern over booster jabs rollout

By Denis Campbell Health policy editor
  • The senior official credited with the early success of the Covid vaccine rollout in England is returning to the NHS to resume her role overseeing the programme, months after leaving to become the head of Boris Johnson’s Downing Street delivery unit .
  • In a statement first reported by the Health Service Journal, Pritchard said: “It is great news that Emily has agreed to return to lead the NHS Covid-19 vaccination programme as our response to the pandemic enters another crucial phase.”
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European countries track rising COVID-19 numbers

By Lisa Schnirring
  • More European countries, including Germany and the Netherlands, are experiencing new upticks in COVID-19 activity, and in the United Kingdom, where cases have already been on the rise for several weeks, officials designated the AY.4.2 Delta subvariant a variant of interest.
  • Ukraine today reported record highs for cases and deaths for the second consecutive day, and officials in Kyiv have ordered a 2-week school closure, according to the Associated Press .
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Millions of Americans now eligible for COVID-19 boosters

By Lisa Schnirring
  • This week the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) signed off on booster doses of all three COVID-19 vaccines currently in use in the United States.
  • As of today, White House officials said 70 million Americans are eligible for a booster, and more than 120 million Americans will be eligible in the coming weeks, or 2 out of 3 vaccinated people in the United States.
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Two-Handed Movements Require More Neural Effort as People Grow Older

By Neuroscience News
  • A team of researchers from Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (Leipzig) has discovered that the age-related decline in bilateral anti-phase movement is linked to differences in alpha and beta neural activity.
  • Summary: Age-related declines in bilateral movement coordination are linked to differences in alpha and beta neural activity, a new study reports.
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Belief in COVID-19 conspiracy theories linked to a greater likelihood of contracting the virus, study finds

By Eric W. Dolan
  • “The COVID-19 pandemic has stimulated many conspiracy theories, and it has become apparent that belief in these conspiracy theories matter for health behavior such as physical distancing,” explained study author Jan‐Willem van Prooijen, an associate professor of psychology at VU Amsterdam.
  • “The more strongly people believed conspiracy theories in April 2020, then by December 2020 the less likely they were to have been tested for corona; if tested, the higher the chance for a positive test result; and, conspiracy beliefs predicted a higher likelihood of having violated regulations to contain the virus, deteriorated economic outcomes, an increased likelihood of social rejection experiences, and overall lower well-being.”
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Fat Cells Found to Play a Central Role in Cognitive Decline and Neurodegeneration

By Neuroscience News
  • “We have aimed to demonstrate that Na,K-ATPase signaling, specifically in adipocytes, play a central role in inducing alterations in specific regions of the brain, most notably in the hippocampus, which is critical to memory and cognitive function,” said senior author Joseph I Shapiro, M.D., professor and dean of the Marshall University Joan C.
  • Using genetically modified mouse models, researchers found oxidative stress through exposure to a Western diet increased the production of inflammatory cytokines confined to adipocytes and altered protein markers of memory and cognition in the hippocampus.
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Free food at school and work often of low nutritional quality

By Amy Elizabeth Roeder
Food obtained for free at school or work makes up an important part of the nutrition safety net for low-income households in the U.S., but much of it is of low nutritional quality, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study was published online October 13, 2021 in PLOS One. Using data from the National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey, the researchers found that more than one fifth of participants’ “food acquisition events”—which could include anything from a home-cooked meal to office doughnuts—were free. Households receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Revision of aspirin regime needs nuanced approach, says expert

  • CHAN: One reason we conducted our study is that we wanted to understand why, in a recent clinical trial of aspirin started in adults over the age of 70, there was no benefit in terms of cancer — and possibly an increased risk of cancer deaths.
  • GAZETTE: What do you think of reports that the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is considering backing away from routine use of aspirin for colorectal cancer prevention?
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ShakeOut gives Trojans a chance to hone their earthquake preparedness skills

By USC News
Each year since 2008, USC has participated in the Great California ShakeOut. The earthquake drill at USC is meant to prepare students, faculty and staff to know what to do in the event of an earthquake and encourage them to make their homes and offices earthquake safe. This year’s drill — at 10:21 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 21 — involved a variety of drills and exercises throughout the campuses. Perhaps the most important takeaway: drop, cover and hold on. Worldwide, the Great ShakeOut has been coordinated since 2007 by the Southern California Earthquake Center. The center — supported by the National Science Foundation and […]Read more >Similar articles >

Bringing WISDOM to Breast Cancer Care

By Alice Park
  • The current screening recommendations are based on studies done at a time when doctors knew much less about the different types of breast cancer, and don’t take into account newer ways to analyze cancers through imaging and genetic testing.
  • The research Esserman is discussing is a potentially groundbreaking study that could transform the way women are screened and treated for breast cancer.
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COVID-19 Scan for Oct 22, 2021

By Lisa Schnirring
  • The second study looked specifically at 112 COVID-19 deaths in those younger than 21 and found that they mostly occurred in older adolescents (median age, 17 years), males (63%), Black people (28%), or Hispanic people (46%).
  • Two recent studies in Pediatrics look at risk factors for severe pediatric COVID-19 and COVID deaths in those younger than 21 years of age.
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Scientists urge UK to prep rapid return to COVID restrictions

By Jill Lawless, Associated Press
  • Many scientists are urging the government to reintroduce some of the measures that it lifted three months ago when more than a year of restrictions ended, including mandatory mask-wearing indoors, social distancing and work-from-home advice.
  • The British government’s scientific advisers urged the government on Friday to ensure coronavirus restrictions can be introduced rapidly, as the rate of new infections continues to grow.
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Mayo Clinic to offer walk-in COVID-19 vaccination clinics in Rochester

By Joel Streed
  • At this location, initial or subsequent COVID-19 vaccinations, third COVID-19 doses for immunocompromised people, COVID-19 booster vaccinations will be available on these dates:
  • At this location, initial or subsequent COVID-19 vaccinations, third COVID-19 doses for immunocompromised people, and COVID-19 booster vaccinations will be available on these dates:
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AP explainer: Is it time to get a COVID-19 booster? Which one?

By Lauran Neerguard, Associated Press
  • If you got Pfizer or Moderna shots first, you’re eligible if your last dose was at least six months ago and you’re 65 or older, or are a younger adult who has health problems or a job or living conditions that put you at higher risk of severe illness or exposure to the coronavirus.
  • U.S. health authorities want to shore up protection in at-risk people who were vaccinated months ago, though they emphasize that the priority remains getting the unvaccinated their first shots.
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Unions warn of ‘winter of chaos’ without urgent action to curb Covid

By Heather Stewart Political editor
  • Trade union leaders representing 3 million frontline workers have warned that the government risks “another winter of chaos” if urgent action is not taken to curb the spread of Covid, including mandatory mask-wearing in shops and on public transport.
  • Ministers said in September they would implement a “plan B”, including the return of mandatory mask-wearing in public places and the reintroduction of working from home guidance, if the NHS risked coming under unsustainable pressure.
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The Three Forms of Inquiry

By Johns Hopkins Medicine
This video designed to increase your knowledge of and skills with the three forms of inquiry. Come learn with your nursing colleagues as we tackle the similarities, differences and nuances of evidence-based practice (EBP) , quality improvement (QI) and research. https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/nursing/center-nursing-inquiry/ […]Read more >Similar articles >

THE IDEA OF AUTUMN: Western culture paradoxes and Eastern society traditions

By Emily L Quint Freeman
I’m a lifetime lover of autumn, the fiery fall colours that herald the season of leaf drop, seed heads, berries and the emergence of anthocyanins, the red pigment in leaves. Throughout spring and summer, the green colour of chlorophyll, which absorbs life-giving sunlight, hides red and yellow leaf pigments. In the fall, plants break down chlorophyll, sending it down to the roots during winter dormancy. The leaves turn golden, ruby and burgundy colours before fading and falling to Earth. Autumn

Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
[…]Read more >Similar articles >
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CDC expands booster rollout, OKs mixing shots

By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
  • Certain people who received Pfizer vaccinations months ago already are eligible for a booster and now the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says specific Moderna and Johnson & Johnson recipients qualify, too.
  • Starting six months past their last Pfizer or Moderna vaccination, people are urged to get a booster if they’re 65 or older, nursing home residents, or at least 50 and at increased risk of severe disease because of health problems.
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UK vaccines watchdog ‘approves second jabs for 16 and 17-year-olds’

By Peter Walker and Denis Campbell
  • While the department of health said it had no information about an imminent announcement on second vaccinations for the age group, it is understood that news could come on it next week.
  • The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) decided in favour of first jabs for the age group in early August, saying at the time that it was likely that second shots would begin 12 weeks after the first dose.
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Brain fog can persist 8 months after COVID diagnosis

By Lisa Schnirring
  • In analyses adjusted for race, smoking, body mass index, underlying illnesses, and depression, hospitalized patients had higher odds than outpatients of deficits in attention (odds ratio [OR], 2.8), executive function (OR, 1.8), category fluency (OR, 3.0), memory encoding (OR, 2.3), and memory recall (OR, 2.2).
  • Adult COVID-19 patients who were hospitalized or visited the emergency department (ED) at a New York City hospital still had cognitive impairments an average of 8 months after diagnosis, according to a research letter today in JAMA Network Open .
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Heather Trickey obituary

By Simon Brindle
  • My wife, Heather Trickey, who has died of cancer aged 50, was an academic, charity worker, Quaker and poet who worked with energy and enthusiasm to find common ground in the fields of women’s reproductive health and women’s rights.
  • She worked at Health Promotion Wales before moving to the Centre for Research in Social Policy, in Loughborough, where she co-edited an international comparative study of workfare policies, An Offer You Can’t Refuse (2001), which has been used as a university set text.
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Voices in Leadership: Dan Glickman

By Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Professor Walter Willett engaged in a conversation with former US Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman. They discussed Sec. Glickman’s leadership journey from US Congress to Cabinet Secretary to the Motion Picture Association of America. They focused on nutrition, discussing SNAP, USDA support of healthy diets, the obesity epidemic, and more. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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“Este es el último pañal que me queda”: la ansiedad de ser padres en la pobreza

By Jenny Gold, Kaiser Health News
Para los padres que viven en la pobreza, la “matemática del pañal” es un cálculo diario, apremiante y angustiante, con el que están familiarizados. En los Estados Unidos, los bebés usan de seis a 10 pañales desechables al día, a un costo promedio de $70 a $80 al mes. Los pañales de marca con alta absorción se venden hasta por medio dólar cada uno, un gasto de más de $120 al mes. Una de cada tres familias estadounidenses no puede pagar por suficientes pañales para mantener a sus bebés y niños pequeños limpios, secos y saludables, según la National Diaper Bank Network. Para muchos padres, eso lleva a elecciones desgarradoras: ¿pañales, comida […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Científicos buscan la causa de una misteriosa inflamación en niños relacionada con covid

By Liz Szabo, Kaiser Health News
Como la mayoría de los niños con covid, Dante y Michael DeMaino no parecían tener síntomas graves. Infectados a mediados de febrero, ambos perdieron los sentidos del gusto y del olfato. Dante, de 9 años, tuvo un día de fiebre baja. Michael, de 13, sintió un “cosquilleo en la garganta”, dijo su madre, Michele DeMaino, de Danvers, Massachusetts. En una visita de seguimiento, “el pediatra auscultó corazón y pulmones, y todo parecía perfecto”, contó DeMaino. Luego, a finales de marzo, Dante volvió a tener fiebre. Después de examinarlo, el médico dijo que probablemente su enfermedad no era “nada para preocuparse”, pero le pidió a DeMaino que lo […]Read more >Similar articles >
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How you’ll know when Covid-19 has gone from “pandemic” to “endemic”

By Sigal Samuel
  • That means the virus will keep circulating in parts of the global population for years, but its prevalence and impact will come down to relatively manageable levels, so it becomes more like the flu than a world-stopping disease.
  • In general, a virus becomes endemic when we — health experts, governmental bodies, and the public — collectively decide that we’re okay with accepting the level of impact the virus has.
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Confronting Ageism in Health Care: A Conversation for Patients, Caregivers and Clinicians

  • Dr. Javette Orgain, a family physician and medical director for Longevity Health Plan of Illinois, which serves nursing home residents; former president of the National Medical Association, which represents African American physicians and their patients; and former assistant dean of the University of Illinois-Chicago’s Urban Health Program.
  • Dr. Michael Wasserman, a geriatrician, advocate for vulnerable older adults during the pandemic and leader of the public policy committee of the California Association of Long Term Care Medicine.
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Let the Booster Mixing Begin

By Katherine J. Wu
  • Switching to a different shot would be allowed, as was authorized by the FDA on Wednesday ; per the draft CDC guidance, people may opt to mix and match based on availability or preference, after assessing their individual risks and benefits.
  • Last night, CDC Director Rochelle Walensky gave the green light for Moderna and Johnson & Johnson booster shots, the long-awaited follow-up to a similar recommendation given to the Pfizer formulation last month.
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New tip sheet: The impact of climate change on health equity

By Melba Newsome
  • This is an opportune time for journalists who aren’t already doing so to begin reporting on climate change as a health equity issue.
  • When President Biden created the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Climate Change and Health Equity (OCCHE) last summer, I realized I hadn’t made some brilliant discovery, I was simply catching up to what the public health and environmental thought leaders had known for some time.
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Pfizer says COVID-19 vaccine more than 90% effective in 5 to 11 year olds

By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
  • Kid-size doses of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine appear safe and nearly 91% effective at preventing symptomatic infections in 5- to 11-year-olds, according to study details released Friday as the U.S. considers opening vaccinations to that age group.
  • A Pfizer study tracked 2,268 kids in that age group who got two shots three weeks apart of either a placebo or the low-dose vaccine.
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Pfizer Says Its COVID-19 Vaccine Appears More Than 90% Effective in Kids

By Lauran Neergaard and Matthew Perrone / AP
  • Kid-size doses of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine appear safe and nearly 91% effective at preventing symptomatic infections in 5- to 11-year-olds, according to study details released Friday as the U.S. considers opening vaccinations to that age group.
  • A Pfizer study tracked 2,268 kids in that age group who got two shots three weeks apart of either a placebo or the low-dose vaccine.
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Sajid Javid’s NHS plan puts GPs at greater risk of abuse

By Denis Campbell Health policy editor
  • Sajid Javid’s tactics of “attacking and threatening” GPs with “league tables of shame” if they do not see enough patients in person risks family doctors, practice nurses and receptionists facing greater abuse and threats, the leader of Britain’s doctors has said.
  • He singled out Javid and NHS England’s plan to publish regular updates on how many patients each GP practice is seeing face-to-face, take action against the lowest-performing 20% and let patients post text message reviews of their most recent experience with their surgery as measures that could turn patients against GPs.
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Weekend reading: labor issues in the food system

By Marion
Saru Jayaraman has a new book out: She explains what this is about in an email: As described in this recent NY Times article, we have been documenting thousands of restaurants raising wages to a median of $13.50 plus tips nationwide in order to recruit staff. As a result, we are so close to passing One Fair Wage – a very hopeful, silver lining to emerge from several challenging years. In this moment of incredible change, we are hoping to use my new book –One Fair Wage: Ending Subminimum Pay in America (New Press, 2021)– to call for policy that will make the increasing wages nationwide permanent. Please join us for one of the in-person or […]Read more >Similar articles >

U.S. Conservatives Want to Save Australia From ‘COVID Tyranny.’ Australians Aren’t Interested

By Chad de Guzman
  • Michael Gunner, chief minister of Australia’s Northern Territory, took to Twitter to rebuke Cruz’s claim last week that the territory’s vaccine mandate places people under a “COVID tyranny.”
  • Australian lawmakers took to Twitter to school American critics of the country’s COVID-19 public health measures, pointing to how well they have worked to prevent deaths in comparison to policies in the U.S., where the death toll has been one of the worst in the world.
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Act early on rising UK Covid cases or face harsher measures, experts warn

By Nicola Davis
  • Documents released by the government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage) on Friday have revealed warnings from experts that if action is not taken rapidly as cases rise, harsher measures may be needed later.
  • Ministers need to act early to counteract rising Covid infections, the government’s scientific advisers have said while suggesting that failure to do so could mean harsher interventions will be required this winter.
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Five tactics used to spread vaccine misinformation in the wellness community, and why they work

By Allyson Chiu
  • Experts say the content shared in some wellness communities has powerful emotional and psychological foundations that can cause even science-minded people to question the public health consensus on the ability of vaccines to help curb the spread of the coronavirus.
  • The uncertainty inherent in the process, and the rapidly-changing public policy based on it, has eroded trust further in authorities and made it easier for members of the wellness community, who are vaccine hesitant, to present scientific material in a misleading way, experts said.
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CDC endorses boosters for Moderna and Johnson & Johnson Covid vaccines

By Associated Press
  • Certain people who received Pfizer vaccinations months ago already are eligible for a booster and now the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says specific Moderna and Johnson & Johnson recipients qualify, too.
  • Starting six months past their last Pfizer or Moderna vaccination, people are urged to get a booster if they’re 65 or older, nursing home residents, or at least 50 and at increased risk of severe disease because of health problems.
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New study calls into question the unique benefits of Western classical music in psychedelic therapy

By Mane Kara-Yakoubian
  • Analysis of data from an open-label study on psilocybin for smoking cessation found a slight benefit of using overtone-based music compared to Western classical music.
  • The researchers argue that the observed trends in this data challenge the prevailing notion that Western classic music (or any specific genre of music), is superior in supporting psychedelic therapy.
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The Connection Between Food and Your Mood

By schneik4
  • “During the winter months, people who have more emotional eating have been shown to have lower levels of vitamin D, which is associated with more anxiety and depression,” says Dr. Albers.
  • “In this study, individuals who feel blue during the winter and fall months, due to the short days, experience an increase in snacking, craving starchy foods and sugary foods, as well as eating more in the evenings,” she says.
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Conservative media use predicted increasing acceptance of COVID-19 conspiracies over the course of 2020

By Eric W. Dolan
  • The use of conservative media, in turn, is associated with increasing belief in COVID-19 conspiracies and reduced willingness to engage in behaviors to prevent the spread of the virus.
  • We find that those followers increasingly accepted pandemic conspiracies over the course of 2020 and that the increase in those beliefs was associated with less reported mask wearing, lower intentions to vaccinate, and reduced confidence in the authority of the CDC.”
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How to retrain your frazzled brain and find your focus again

By Eleanor Morgan
  • She has written a book called Peak Mind: Find Your Focus, Own Your Attention, Invest 12 Minutes a Day, a four-week training programme based on her research showing how simple mindfulness exercises carried out by people with high-demand jobs, such as soldiers, elite athletes and emergency medics, improve many aspects of cognitive and emotional health, including strengthening our attention .
  • “Working memory is like a mental whiteboard with disappearing ink,” says Jha. When that whiteboard is full of thoughts, feelings and images relating to what’s making us stressed, there is no room for new information.
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‘I need to work’: Italy’s green pass rule triggers rise in Covid jab uptake

By Angela Giuffrida in Rome
  • “We are not against vaccinations but don’t agree with the way the government has gone about this, telling people they can’t work if they don’t have this pass.
  • “I was cautious because my wife and I want to have a baby and so we were taking our time to decide … but when the green pass came in for the workplace, we felt we had to do it,” said Elia.
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Common dialysis treatment for patients with acute kidney injury can lead to poor outcomes

ROCHESTER, Minn. ― Patients with acute kidney injury who receive continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), a common dialysis method, have a high incidence of needing this dialysis method reinstituted after having it removed. This contributes to poor 90-day outcomes, according to new research published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Though CRRT is a common dialysis method for critically ill patients with acute kidney injury, little research has been performed to determine at what point in kidney […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Countdown to ecstasy: how music is being used in healing psychedelic trips

By Michelle Lhooq
  • “Music is an ideal tool for therapy because it provides a loose structure in which the patient can project the personal content of their subjective minds,” says Mendel Kaelen, founder of the psychedelic music app Wavepaths and former neuroscientist at Imperial College.
  • “We’re entering an era where this kind of therapy is going to be legal and widespread, and you need to have music for it,” says Hopkins, whose album was timed to last for exactly the length of a typical ketamine trip.
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Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast: Changing COVID-19 recommendations mean the science is working

As continuing research guides medical recommendations, it seems that there are COVID-19 updates released daily. These recommendations cover a range of topics, including whether COVID-19 booster vaccinations are necessary to whether COVID-19 vaccines can be mixed and matched. "The fact that recommendations are changing is not evidence people don't know what they're doing," says Dr. Gregory Poland, head ofMayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "It's evidence that they do know what they're doing and are paying […]Read more >Similar articles >

Asian Pacific American Student Services’ mentoring program sees record interest

By USC News
  • Asian Pacific American Student Services, or APASS, opened PEER mentee applications to both first- and second-year students so they have the opportunity to engage and connect with a mentor as they transition from an online experience to an in-person one.
  • Taylor Kamemoto, the PEER program assistant, said that her mentee experience during her freshman year "helped me immensely to navigate the new, overwhelming aspects of adjusting to college life."
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Cancer patients face ‘perfect storm’ as Covid piles pressure on NHS

By Andrew Gregory Health editor
  • Data published last week also shows that in August there was a record-high number of patients forced to wait for more than two months after an urgent referral from their GP before they started cancer treatment.
  • Figures published by NHS England, and analysed by Macmillan for the Guardian, show the number of patients starting treatment in August following a decision to treat fell to 25,800.
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Australia has delivered just 8% of Covid vaccinations promised to developing nations

By Caitlin Cassidy
  • A recently released report by the People’s Vaccine Alliance found pharmaceutical companies and wealthy nations had delivered just one in seven of the vaccination doses promised to developing countries through the global vaccine-sharing Covax initiative .
  • Some 12% of doses promised by western pharmaceutical companies had been supplied to Covax, the initiative designed to help low and middle-income countries get fair access to Covid vaccines.
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The suggestion Covid deniers should stay out of public hospitals is appalling | Stephen Parnis

By Stephen Parnis
  • Reportedly, in discussing the enormous strain the pandemic is placing on medical resources, he suggests that those who deny the existence of Covid-19 “should update their advance care directives and inform their relatives that they do not wish to receive care in the public health system if diagnosed with the virus”.
  • I think I speak for almost every doctor when I say care is provided on the basis of medical need, and the key principles of beneficence (doing all good for the patient) and non-maleficence (doing no harm) should always be applied.
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Victorian government used ‘low grade’ mask study to justify mandate, experts say

By Melissa Davey Medical editor
  • The study analysed images of people in public places from the digital archive of The Age newspaper taken between 10 July and 2 August 2020 – before and after the mandatory mask policy was introduced in the state’s long lockdown.
  • The mask mandate in Victoria has been controversial because it requires people to wear masks at all times, including when outdoors in open spaces, despite strong evidence that the risk of indoor transmission, especially within households, is significantly higher.
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Early accumulation of tau in the brain associated with a rapid decline of episodic memory in Alzheimer’s disease

By Marco Bucci, The Conversation
  • But our latest study, published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, shows that an early accumulation of tau in the brain is a better predictor of Alzheimer’s related memory decline than an accumulation of amyloid plaque.
  • Tau accumulation in the brain (as shown by PET scan) was also more accurate than tau measured in spinal fluid at detecting a short-term memory decline.
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Covid booster jabs could be brought forward as UK daily cases hit 52,000

By Heather Stewart and Jessica Elgot
  • Millions of people could have their booster jab brought forward as ministers consider cutting the six-month gap between doses as part of a scramble to shore up the faltering vaccine programme and avoid imposing Covid restrictions.
  • Mark Harper, the chair of the Tory Covid Recovery Group, said that in the earlier stages of the vaccine rollout “there was a massive focus on it in government, from the prime minister downwards … we need that level of focus on boosters”.
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A son’s brain cancer. A father’s story. [PODCAST]

By The Podcast by KevinMD

“As you wait, you have a lot of time to think. You comb through the past in search of something you might have missed. If we had acted sooner on the signs of his illness—had the cancer been diagnosed earlier—would Lee have had a better chance? You think about your child as a toddler and

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A son’s brain cancer. A father’s story. [PODCAST] originally appeared in KevinMD.com.

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Tackling inequalities often not a main priority in healthcare, says CQC

By PA Media
  • The regulator said an example of this was the specific needs of people with a learning disability from black and minority ethnic groups.
  • The annual state of care report says: “Providers and representatives from the voluntary and community sector have told us that recovery needs to focus on addressing health inequalities, particularly those that were amplified by the pandemic.
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CDC Recommends Boosters of Moderna and Johnson&Johnson COVID-19 Vaccines

By Alice Park
  • The endorsement follows a similar decision from an expert Food and Drug Administration (FDA) panel that allows people to receive any of the three authorized or approved COVID-19 vaccines, from Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and J&J-Janssen, as the booster dose.
  • As with the previous discussion about boosters, the 15-member committee were relatively agreed on two things: that due to the lower efficacy of J&J-Janssen’s vaccine, people who got that shot should receive a booster; and that for people vaccinated with the two mRNA vaccines from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna, those over age 65 and anyone with underlying health conditions, regardless of their age, should get a booster dose.
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Anti-obesity scheme to offer voucher rewards for healthy living

By Andrew Gregory Health editor
  • Sajid Javid, the health secretary, said: “I want to ensure we’re doing as much as we can to tackle health disparities across the country, and this new pilot will pave the way for developing innovate ways to improve the lives of individuals, and also help to reduce strain on the NHS.
  • Ministers will offer rewards such as clothes vouchers and discounted theme park tickets in return for exercising and eating healthily, under plans to tackle Britain’s obesity crisis.
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Mapping Neurons in the Brain Involved With Social Interactions With Others in Groups

By Neuroscience News
  • In research published in Science, investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have mapped the neurons in the brain that allow a monkey to process and remember the interactions and behaviors of another monkey to influence the animal’s own actions.
  • At the same time, the researchers recorded the activity of individual neurons in a brain area known to play a role in social cognition, called the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC).
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CDC panel OKs Moderna, J&J COVID boosters, mixed doses when needed

By Jim Wappes
  • Certain people who received Moderna and all who got Johnson & Johnson (J&J) COVID-19 vaccines should receive a booster dose, and in general, people should stick with the original vaccine they got, an advisory panel for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said today.
  • For Moderna, ACIP members said people ages 65 and older and younger adults in certain risk groups should get a third booster dose.
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Bat Study Reveals Secrets of the Social Brain

By Neuroscience News
  • In the study, neuroscientists at the University of California, Berkeley, used wireless neural recording devices to track the brain activity of Egyptian fruit bats as they freely interacted in groups and occasionally vocalized to each other through high-pitched screeches and grunts.
  • “Most studies of communication, particularly vocalization, are typically performed with single animals or with pairs of animals, but basically none have been conducted in actual group settings,” said study co-first author Maimon Rose, a graduate student in the NeuroBat Lab at UC Berkeley.
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People’s Eyes Reveal That Clichés Are Underrated

By Neuroscience News
  • Her research offers a possible explanation as to why metaphorical expressions are so common in all known languages: Metaphorical expressions are more engaging and convey richer meaning than literal phrases that express the same basic content, or concrete descriptions that use similarly imageable words.
  • When they combined this with the pupil data, the researchers concluded that conventional metaphors are measurably more engaging than literal paraphrases or concrete sentences in a way that is not a function of difficulty or amount of information.
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Anxiety Impacts Ability to Perceive Changes in Breathing

By Neuroscience News
  • “We found people who have higher levels of anxiety have altered perceptions of their breathing compared to people with lower anxiety—they are actually less sensitive to changes in their breathing, they have reduced ‘insight’ into how well they are able to perceive their body, and they have altered brain activity when they are predicting what will happen to their breathing in the future,” Dr. Harrison says.
  • People with higher levels of anxiety have altered perceptions of their breathing, which can lead to even more anxiety, a University of Otago researcher has found.
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Practice Really Does Make Perfect

By Neuroscience News
  • Having done the task many times, “you’ve established this kind of brain-to-movement dictionary, where you’ve explored all these different ways that you can give commands and they can move your body,” said Alvarado, who is now a post-doctoral researcher at Harvard University.
  • Researchers found when a male zebra finch is in the presence of an attractive female and delivers its rehearsed mating call, a noradrenaline release in the basal ganglia shuts down variability in song and makes the call as perfect as it can be.
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Looking Beyond the Individual Brain to Study the Collective Mind

By Neuroscience News
  • The co-authors – neuroscientist Aron Barbey, a professor of psychology at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign; Richard Patterson, a professor emeritus of philosophy at Emory University; and Steven Sloman, a professor of cognitive, linguistic and psychological sciences at Brown University – wanted to address the limitations of studying brains in isolation, out of the context in which they operate and stripped of the resources they rely on for optimal function.
  • Summary: In order to better understand the role that knowledge serves in human intelligence, it is essential to look beyond the individual and focus studies on the community overall, researchers say.
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Gut-Brain Axis Response to Inflammation May Underlie Inflammatory Bowel Disease-Related Mental Symptoms

By Neuroscience News
  • In response to gut inflammation, such as that caused by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the vascular barrier in the brain choroid plexus closes, locking down access to the brain, according to a new study.
  • While this gut-brain vascular axis deregulation likely protects the brain from inflammation, the findings suggest it may also result in the various cognitive and psychiatric symptoms that are occasionally associated with IBD.
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Prozac Pegged as Potential First Treatment for a Leading Cause of Blindness

By Neuroscience News
  • Gelfand and collaborators have found early evidence that the drug fluoxetine – marketed as Prozac – may be effective against atrophic (or “dry”) age-related macular degeneration, a condition that affects nearly 200 million people worldwide.
  • People taking the drug had a “significantly” slower rate of developing dry AMD, the researchers report in a new scientific paper outlining their findings.
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How ‘segregation, disinvestment, and concentrated poverty’ preceded lead troubles in Benton Harbor

By Frances Kai-Hwa Wang
BENTON HARBOR, Mich. -- Two bridges stretch across the winding St. Joseph River to connect the Twin Cities, or the Little Twin Cities, of Benton Harbor and St. Joseph in southwestern Michigan. From the Benton Harbor side, one bridge leads to the hospital that serves all the people in these two communities, where in the past, Black residents have complained of disparate treatment. The other bridge leads to the jail. "The lives of these two […]Read more >Similar articles >

Migrants and Refugees Face an Invisible Trauma We Can’t Ignore

By Gunisha Kaur
  • The impact of uncertainty extends beyond a single affected individual or family: it permeates entire communities through vicarious trauma, or trauma transmitted second-hand through bearing witness to stories of other people who have experienced pain and suffering.
  • While proponents of the program welcomed the move and heralded it an “ effort to bulletproof the DACA program,” our response in this moment overlooks a fundamental problem: each challenge on immigration—whether the Muslim Ban, family separation, or challenging DACA—takes a toll on refugee and migrants through vicarious trauma and weathering, regardless of the outcome.
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Un GPS robótico para dirigir y administrar bioterapias regenerativas

By Sharon Theimer
Un broncoscopio controlado a distancia que actúa como un sistema de posicionamiento global (GPS) persigue aquellos tumores pulmonares difíciles de encontrar y obtiene una buena biopsia, dice un estudio colaborativo deMayo Clinic. Esta investigación realizada en varios lugares y publicada enAnnals of Thoracic Surgery (Anales de Cirugía Torácica), sienta las bases para descubrir con precisión el cáncer incipiente y dirigir contra él las bioterapias regenerativas necesarias para estimular la recuperación. La inteligencia artificial obtenida con las exploraciones por tomografía computarizada guía el cable robótico de fibra óptica y facilita […]Read more >Similar articles >
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COVID-19 Scan for Oct 21, 2021

By Jim Wappes
  • While Swedish workers' occupations were not linked to increased COVID-19 mortality risk, older people who lived with these adults had an increased risk, according to a study published yesterday in the Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment, and Health.
  • COVID-19 vaccination does not increase the risk of miscarriage during the first trimester of pregnancy, according to a Norwegian case-control study that involved 13,956 women, 5.5% of whom were vaccinated against the virus.
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Low COVID vaccine uptake, worse outcomes noted in racial minorities

By Jim Wappes
  • Two new JAMA Network Open studies confirm that US racial minorities have borne an outsized burden during the COVID-19 pandemic, with showing a 30% higher rate of vaccination in White adults compared with their Black and Hispanic peers, and the other finding that non-White coronavirus patients were much more likely to be hospitalized, need intensive care, and die.
  • Assuming that disparities in state-reported relative vaccine uptake by race and ethnicity would continue beyond the end of March, Hispanic and Black adults across the country were projected to reach 50% coverage with at least one vaccine dose 57 days and 26 days later, respectively, than their White counterparts.
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Can GPs take industrial action and how might it affect patients?

By Denis Campbell Health policy editor
  • Significantly, the GPC, which negotiates family doctors’ conditions with the Department of Health and NHS England, has also decided to move towards holding a ballot on industrial action .
  • The British Medical Association’s GPs committee (GPC) has voted to reject an attempt by the health secretary, Sajid Javid, to force family doctors in England to see any patient who seeks an in-person appointment.
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EGO VS. HEART: Rebirthing the Ego when it grows too large

By Eleni Stephanides
I first encountered the word “Ego” when reading a Goosebumps book as a child. Though I didn’t understand what it meant at the time, I did know what Eggo waffles were—and from then on, the word ‘ego’ became inextricably linked to an image of the crusty yellow breakfast food. Each time I read the term, waffles inevitably came to mind.A magazine article’s phrasing of “man and his ego,” for instance, conjured a mental picture of the two strolling side by The

Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
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KHN’s ‘What the Health?’: Dems Agree to Agree, But Not on What to Agree On

  • Meanwhile, Biden administration officials unveil plans to provide covid-19 vaccines to younger children without looking like they are prejudging the science, in an attempt to avoid the mixed messaging that presaged the rollout of booster doses for adults.
  • This week’s panelists are Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Joanne Kenen of Politico and Johns Hopkins, Tami Luhby of CNN and Rachel Cohrs of Stat.
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Does the Vaccine Cut Your Risk of Getting Long COVID?

By Carina Woudenberg
  • But how well does the vaccine prevent people with breakthrough cases from facing long-term symptoms such as chronic fatigue or a loss of smell and taste?
  • They found that the odds of someone having symptoms for longer than 28 days after (post-vaccination) infection were cut in half if they had already received two shots, suggesting that the risk of long COVID is diminished in individuals who have gotten both jabs.
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Stunning Virtual Reality Project Takes You to the Arctic — and Into Climate Change

By USC News
  • "We wanted to create something that could help with climate change," says Rong Deng, a master's student in interactive media and game design at the USC School of Cinematic Arts and the project's creative director.
  • The USC student-led interactive virtual reality climate project reveals that this melting process could release up to 53 times as much carbon as sources of pollution like cars in a major city like Los Angeles.
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GPs in England threaten industrial action over in-person appointments

By Denis Campbell Health policy editor

Family doctors reject plan to force them to see any patient who wants face-to-face appointment

GPs in England are threatening to take industrial action in protest at the government’s attempt to force them to see any patient who wants a face-to-face appointment.

The British Medical Association’s GPs committee voted unanimously to reject the plan by the health secretary, Sajid Javid, that included “naming and shaming” surgeries that see too few patients in person.

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COVID-19 vaccination plan for kids 5-11

By Deb Balzer
  • "The FDA (Food and Drug Administration) will be meeting to review the data that was submitted for emergency use authorization on Oct. 26," says Dr. Nipunie Rajapakse, a pediatric infectious diseases physician with the Mayo Clinic Children's Center .
  • "Pfizer has submitted an application for emergency use authorization for a two-dose series, a vaccine for children 5 to 11 years of age," says Dr. Rajapakse.
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