Jan 19, 2021

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News from all over the USA

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Open letter calls for publishing boycott of Trump administration memoirs

By Alison Flood
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  • Five-hundred American authors and literary professionals have signed a letter calling on US publishers not to sign book deals with members of the Trump administration, saying “those who enabled, promulgated, and covered up crimes against the American people should not be enriched through the coffers of publishing”.
  • Lyga’s letter comes in the same week that rightwing Missouri senator Josh Hawley was forced to find a new publisher for his book The Tyranny of Big Tech, after it was dropped by Simon & Schuster over his backing of baseless claims that the election was stolen.
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Closure of an iconic Paris bookshop alarms French bibliophiles

By Julia Webster Ayuso
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  • Gibert Jeune, a popular chain, has announced it will be closing its flagship shop in the Latin Quarter in March – the latest in a series of closures and appeals for help that threaten the future of the city’s booksellers.
  • Gibert Jeune once attracted long queues of students in search of cheap secondhand books before the start of each academic year; most students who have studied in Paris will have paid a visit to the six-floor shop at some point to find a book for their course.
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‘People in their 80s and 90s are bloody brilliant!’ Kate Mosse on writing – and being a carer

By Emine Saner
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  • Mosse’s move into historical fiction changed her life with the success of Labyrinth – a Holy Grail adventure story – in 2005, and the following two books in her Languedoc trilogy, so this return to the genre has felt exciting, she says.
  • I t was 10 years ago that Kate Mosse got the idea for her latest series of historical novels – and immediately tried to talk herself out of it.
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Thin Places by Kerri ní Dochartaigh review – a survivor’s story

By Sean O’Hagan
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  • Known to locals through oral stories passed down the generations, they are vestiges of an older, stranger Ireland, their resonance still palpable, Kerri ní Dochartaigh suggests, to those attuned to their otherness.
  • When she began writing Thin Places, the invisibility of the border between the two counties of Donegal and Derry was threatened by the looming possibility of a hard Brexit.
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