Nov 30, 2021

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Severe Covid infection doubles chances of dying in following year – study

By Sarah Marsh
  • “We conducted a previous study that showed that patients with severe Covid-19 who recovered were at significantly greater risk of being hospitalised in the subsequent six months,” said ProfArch Mainous of the University of Florida, the lead author of the study.
  • The research, published in Frontiers in Medicine, suggests that serious coronavirus infections may significantly damage long-term health, showing the importance of vaccination.
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New Zealand to enshrine protections for pill testing in ‘world first’

By Tess McClure in Christchurch
  • While a number of countries, such as the Netherlands and Portugal have longstanding drug-checking services, many operate in a legal grey zone, she said – whereas New Zealand’s laws would explicitly protect the practice.
  • “This legislation is about keeping people safe,” the New Zealand health minister, Andrew Little, said in a statement.
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Study uncovers a feedback loop effect between attachment anxiety and manipulative mate retention behaviors

By Eric W. Dolan
  • Previous research has indicated that anxiously attached individuals tend to engage more frequently in cost-inflicting mate retention strategies (such as snooping through a partner’s phone or talking to another person at a party to make a partner jealous.) Barbaro and her colleagues replicated those findings with a study of 104 young adults who were currently in a sexually active relationship that had lasted at least three months.
  • “Although mate retention had been researched for decades in the field of evolutionary psychology, it had yet to be connected to the large research area of attachment theory, which to me seemed like an obvious intersection,” said study author Nicole Barbaro, an adjunct professor at Utah Valley University and research scientist at WGU Labs.
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Using AI to Successfully Detect Signs of Anxiety

By Neuroscience News
  • Khan says the rapid development in the field of AI and sensor technology “has made it possible to access and process the data related to mental, emotional and behavior disorders.
  • Anjum and collaborators Nida Saddaf Khan and Sayeed Ghani from the Institute of Business Administration in Karachi, Pakistan collected an extensive range of data from adult participants for their Human Activity Recognition (HAR) study.
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Xenobots: Team Builds First Living Robots That Can Reproduce

By Neuroscience News
  • “With the right design—they will spontaneously self-replicate,” says Joshua Bongard, a computer scientist and robotics expert at the University of Vermont who co-led the new research.
  • The same team that built the first living robots has discovered that these computer-designed and hand-assembled organisms can swim out into their tiny dish, find single cells, gather hundreds of them together, and assemble “baby” Xenobots inside their Pac-Man-shaped “mouth”—that, a few days later, become new Xenobots that look and move just like themselves.
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Stroke drug shows promise in treating Alzheimer’s and dementia

By USC News
  • A new study published Tuesday in the Journal of Experimental Medicine showed the drug, 3K3A-APC, protected mice from injury to the brain's white matter — the second leading cause of dementia in humans.
  • A human stroke drug, fast-tracked by the Food and Drug Administration and soon entering Phase 3 clinical trials, shows intriguing signs that it might also be a safe and powerful defense against Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia.
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FDA Panel Narrowly Backs a First-of-a-Kind COVID-19 Antiviral Pill Made By Merck

By MATTHEW PERRONE / AP
  • A panel of U.S. health advisers on Tuesday narrowly backed a closely watched COVID-19 pill from Merck, setting the stage for a likely authorization of the first drug that Americans could take at home to treat the coronavirus.
  • Experts backing the treatment stressed that it should not be used by anyone who is pregnant and called on FDA to recommend extra precautions before the drug is prescribed, including pregnancy tests for women of child-bearing age.
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FDA panel recommends molnupiravir, first pill for COVID-19

By Jim Wappes
  • Today the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) antimicrobial drugs advisory committee voted to recommend the use of Merck's molnupiravir—the first pill indicated to treat COVID-19 infections and prevent hospitalization and death—13 to 10, concluding that potential benefits outweighed risks to patients who were at risk for developing severe COVID-19.
  • Despite extensive genomic sequencing, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the White House today said the Omicron (B.1.1.529) COVID-19 variant has yet to be detected in the United States.
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How omicron could shape pandemic holiday plans — and what you can do about it

By Laura Santhanam
  • The emergence of omicron has raised a slew of questions about how this variant will behave and what it means for the future of the pandemic for people across the globe, along with pure logistical questions about public health protocols, our holiday plans and daily lives.
  • The tools that have reduced new infections, hospitalizations and death across the pandemic remain our best protection, epidemiologists, virologists and public health experts told the PBS NewsHour.
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Netherlands detections hint at earlier Omicron spread

By Lisa Schnirring
  • In a statement today, the Netherlands' National Institute for Public Health (RIVM) said that the samples that yielded the Omicron variant were obtained on Nov 19 and 23, before South Africa announced its findings and before travel bans went into effect.
  • Health officials in the Netherlands today said they have detected the Omicron (B.1.1.529) variant in two samples collected before travel measures took effect, raising the possibility of earlier and wider spread than originally thought.
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Long-Haul COVID Can Include Chronic Fatigue

  • Researchers found that nearly half of the 41 post-COVID patients they studied suffered from the sort of fever, aches, fatigue and depression symptoms that have long been associated with chronic fatigue, also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome.
  • That’s the key takeaway from a fresh look at patients who continue to struggle with severe fatigue, poor sleep, brain fog, muscle aches and pains long after their initial -- and often mild -- COVID infection has otherwise resolved.
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Fauci: Omicron ‘Very Different From Other Variants’

  • The newly detected Omicron COVID-19 variant may be highly infectious and less responsive to available vaccines than other mutations, but it is too early to know how it compares to the Delta variant, top infectious disease official Anthony Fauci, MD, said Tuesday.
  • “Remember, as with other variants, although partial immune escape may occur, vaccines -- particularly boosters -- give a level of antibodies that, even with variants like Delta, give you a degree of cross-protection, particularly against severe disease,” Fauci said.
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Weak immune systems tied to more COVID-19 breakthrough infections

By Jim Wappes
  • In the retrospective study, published today in the Journal of Medical Economics, a team led by researchers from Pfizer analyzed the health records of 1,277,747 people aged 16 or older who had received two doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine from Dec 10, 2020, to Jul 8, 2021.
  • While only 978 of 1,176,907 people (0.08%) who had received their second dose of COVID-19 vaccine at least 2 weeks before had a breakthrough infection, people with weakened immune systems accounted for upwards of 38% of infections, 60% of hospitalizations, and both deaths.
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New cognitive science research gives insight into how infants understand on-screen animated events

By Eric W. Dolan
  • “First, while there is a lot of research on infants’ and children’s understanding of drawings, pictures, or scale models, not much work has been dedicated to the cognitive mechanism underlying these processes.
  • The researchers then had infants watch as an animated ball appeared to fall from a cartoon seesaw on a television into one of two real boxes below the screen.
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Cultural healing

By Karen Gail Feldscher
  • Joseph Gone urged the use of traditional healing practices to treat mental health problems among Native Americans at the Yerby Diversity Lecture in Public Health
  • November 30, 2021 – Over the past three decades, Joseph Gone, a research psychologist focusing on Native American mental health, has learned that it’s crucial to reconcile modern psychological techniques with Indigenous cultural practices.
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News Scan for Nov 30, 2021

By Jim Wappes
  • In an American College of Cardiology news release, lead study author Donna Mancini, MD, said that COVID-19 survivors may have residual organ damage from their infections "The CPET results demonstrate several abnormalities including reduced exercise capacity, excessive ventilatory response and abnormal breathing patterns which would impact their normal daily life activities," she said.
  • Many COVID-19 survivors experience impaired circulation, abnormal breathing patterns, and chronic fatigue syndrome an average of 9 months after diagnosis, finds a small, single-center study yesterday in JACC: Heart Failure .
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Biden says no new lockdowns for Omicron COVID-19 variant

By Jim Wappes
  • Biden said his top advisors, including Anthony Fauci, MD, believe the current vaccines in use in the United States will offer some protection against the variant strain, but the administration is working with scientists from Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson to develop contingency plans if needed.
  • Today President Joe Biden addressed the nation on the Omicron (B.1.1.529) variant, a concerning strain of the COVID-19 virus first identified in South Africa late last week.
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Do Current COVID-19 Tests Still Detect Omicron?

By Alice Park
  • The majority of tests used by commercial and public health labs can detect SARS-CoV-2, but they can’t confirm which version of the virus is present.
  • The Delta variant, which is now responsible for nearly 99% of new cases around the world, does not share this omission, and produces a three-for-three match on all three regions targeted by Thermo Fisher’s PCR test.
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Labour reshuffle a ‘move towards the voters’, says Wes Streeting

By Heather Stewart and Jessica Elgot
  • Labour’s new shadow health secretary, Wes Streeting, has said he will bring a “reforming mindset” to the role, and called Keir Starmer’s reshuffle “a move towards the voters,” amid fears among leftwing MPs that it marked a lurch to the right.
  • Disgruntled backbench MPs complained that Starmer’s leadership had become a “Trojan Horse,” for Labour ’s right wing, after he stamped his authority on the party with Monday’s ruthless shake-up .
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Boris Johnson contradicts expert advice to cancel Christmas socialising

By Rowena Mason, Nicola Davis, Aubrey Allegretti, Sally Weale and Andrew Gregory
  • Prof Andrew Hayward, co-director of the UCL Institute of Epidemiology and Health Care, said: “I am concerned that the intensification of mixing at Christmas social events will provide a boost to transmission at just the time when the Omicron variant will probably be picking up speed, potentially leading to an earlier peak in the new year before we have an opportunity to counteract this through boosters.
  • He also stressed that current guidance to wear masks on public transport and in shops was enough at this stage, despite Jenny Harries, the chief executive of the UK Health Security Agency, suggesting people should reduce their social contact as fears grow that existing vaccines will prove less effective against the Omicron variant.
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Con el fin de las licencias pagas por covid, empleados sienten la presión de ir a la oficina

By Rae Ellen Bichell
Tanto economistas como expertos en salud pública dicen que la licencia por enfermedad con goce de sueldo es una herramienta esencial, tanto como las pruebas, las máscaras y las vacunas, en el esfuerzo por prevenir la infección por covid-19 y mantener seguros los lugares de trabajo. Sin embargo, Estados Unidos se encuentra en medio de otra temporada navideña con covid, y las leyes federales que ofrecían a sus trabajadores licencias pagas por enfermedad vinculadas a esta infección han expirado. Colorado, Los Ángeles y Pittsburgh se encuentran entre una pequeña cantidad de lugares que han implementado sus propias protecciones contra covid. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Pandemic Lockdowns, Cleaner Air Tied to Fewer Heart Attacks

  • When skies were blue and air pollution was reduced during stay-at-home lockdowns at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, there were fewer severe heart attacks in the United States, a new study suggests.
  • This study "is perhaps one of the few in the United States suggesting a reduction in [heart attacks] as a consequence of COVID-19-related reduction in air pollution levels," says Sanjay Rajagopalan, MD, who was not involved with this research.
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Undergrad’s papers published in prestigious medical journals

  • Weeks before the Lancet article, Nature Medicine published Bajaj’s “Health-based civic engagement is a professional responsibility,” co-authored with Stanford and Alister Francois Martin, an assistant professor at the Medical School.
  • “I’m a big believer in the power of writing to push conversations forward,” said Bajaj, who collaborated with his mentor, Fatima Cody Stanford, an assistant professor of medicine and pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, and sociology concentrator Lucy Tu ’24 on the recent Lancet paper “Superhuman, but never enough: Black women in medicine.”
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LET GO: A story about the inevitable nature of change

By Kunal Mehra
I’ve been living here for almost seven months now. When I was born, it was early April. The days were starting to get longer, warmer and sunnier, but of course, I didn’t know about that change. I was a newborn, and all I knew was that it felt great to soak in the sunshine, to be bathed in occasional showers and to feel secure in the knowledge that I was firmly and lovingly attached to my branch. I knew I’d The post LET GO: A story about the inevitable nature of change appeared

Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
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Wearable Fitness Trackers Could Detect COVID Before You Do

  • That’s exactly what a group of researchers hoped would happen when they tested a real-time COVID-19 infection alerting system that relied on the data that smartwatches and activity monitor wearables can collect.
  • Of the 278 people who reported receiving a positive COVID-19 test, 84 participants (all wearing a Fitbit or Apple Watch) had enough data around the time they had an infection for them to receive alerts.
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MPs vote for stricter Covid rules on mask-wearing and isolation in England

By Aubrey Allegretti Political correspondent
  • The second measure, which will force close contacts of a positive Covid case carrying the Omicron variant to isolate for 10 days regardless of their vaccine status, amends existing regulations on isolation, due to expire in mid-March 2022.
  • MPs have approved tougher Covid rules that came into force overnight making masks mandatory in more places in England and changing isolation requirements due to concern over the Omicron variant.
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NYC greenlights safe sites for drug use in effort to curb overdoses

By Associated Press
  • The first officially authorized safe havens for people to use heroin and other narcotics have been cleared to open in New York City in hopes of curbing overdoses, the mayor and health commissioner said Tuesday.
  • Proponents say the facilities save lives by recognizing the reality of drug use and providing a place where users are watched for signs of overdoses, which claimed a record number of lives in the city and nation last year.
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After climate summit, experts discuss key takeaways, next steps

By Karen Gail Feldscher
  • Pate, the former minister of health in Nigeria, focused his remarks on the need for global equity when it comes to climate-driven health issues, which disproportionately affect poorer countries despite the fact that richer nations produce the vast majority of carbon emissions.
  • Panelists included Renee Salas, Yerby Fellow at the Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment (Harvard Chan C-CHANGE), and Muhammad Pate, Julio Frenk Professor of the Practice of Public Health Leadership, both from Harvard Chan School, as well as Jeff Nesbit, executive director of the nonprofit Climate Nexus.
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Postpartum Depression Can Harm Women’s Finances

  • "These findings highlight the importance of screening and expanding access to mental health support services for low-income pregnant and postpartum women," said study author Slawa Rokicki, an instructor at Rutgers School of Public Health in New Brunswick, N.J.
  • TUESDAY, Nov. 30, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Besides its terrible impact on mental health, postpartum depression can also bring long-term financial struggles to affected women, new research shows.
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What Researchers Have Learned About Whether it’s Possible to ‘Cure’ HIV

By Alice Park
  • The woman tested positive for HIV after becoming infected from her partner, but soon after, her body’s immune system was somehow able to control the virus and prevent it from spilling more copies of itself into her body and, more importantly, block it from establishing reservoirs of latent virus in places like the lymph nodes—all without being on the powerful anti-HIV drugs that are normally needed to suppress the virus.
  • Both of her patients belonged to a group known as elite controllers, or people who are able to suppress HIV at very low, often undetectable levels, with their immune systems without the help of anti-HIV drugs.
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A Pandemic Page-Turner

  • We sat down with Kang, a primary care doctor in Omaha, NE, to find out what inspired her to write this book, which includes the compelling human stories behind such outbreaks as smallpox, bubonic plague, polio, HIV, and COVID-19, and why it’s a must-read.
  • WebMD: What’s fascinating is that COVID-19 isn’t the main focus of your book.
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FDA panel review final hurdle for Merck’s COVID-19 pill

By Matthew Perrone, Associated Press
  • An experimental COVID-19 drug that could soon become the first U.S.-authorized pill to treat the coronavirus faces one final hurdle Tuesday: A panel of government experts will scrutinize data on the medication from drugmaker Merck.
  • The Food and Drug Administration is asking its outside experts whether the agency should authorize the pill, weighing new information that it is less effective than first reported and may cause birth defects.
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FROM THE LABS: New evidence supports a cancer-promoting role for enzyme MAPK6

By Ana Rodríguez
  • “Some studies concluded that MAPK6 promoted cancer growth while others indicated the opposite effect,” said corresponding author Dr. Feng Yang, assistant professor of molecular and cellular biology at Baylor.
  • Yang and colleagues’ findings in the lab show that while inhibiting MAPK6 and mTOR activities separately reduces AKT phosphorylation and cancer cell growth, inhibiting both simultaneously achieves a more robust tumor-suppressing activity.
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Reflections after the last ER shift

By Jeff Baker, MD
  • I am about to count down those remaining twelve-hour shifts: 4, 3, 2, 1 … and I find the anticipation of exiting the hospital through that ambulance entrance for the last time-as the physician, to lie somewhere between liberation and dread, somewhat like a man must feel like when he comes up for parole, after serving a long sentence for a crime he didn’t commit.
  • And down the road, when you reflect on your memories of that story with both wonder and regret, it remains to some degree uncertain to each of us how much truth we were able to live out in the historical continuum of small moments where compassion, frustration, heroism and just surviving defined our cumulative attitudes and actions.
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Hospital ratings: How journalists can help consumers have important conversations

By Kerry Dooley Young
  • But the release of new data from organizations such as Leapfrog can provide news pegs allowing journalists to introduce some readers to this topic, while also reminding others of the resources available to research the quality of local hospitals, Austin said.
  • “Few things in health journalism make me cringe more than news releases touting hospital ratings and awards,” wrote veteran journalist Charles Ornstein in a 2013 article for AHCJ.
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‘This Wasn’t in the Job Description’ HR Departments Are Navigating Confusing COVID-19 Religious Exemption Requests

By Sanya Mansoor
  • As businesses across the country start imposing strict COVID-19 vaccine and testing requirements, some employees are claiming religious exemptions to avoid getting vaccinated—putting human resources departments on the frontlines of a fraught political issue that has already proven fertile ground for lawsuits.
  • “There are people who are going to have a sincerely held religious belief, but there’s a lot of folks out there who just object to the vaccine, and this will be their avenue to not get it,” says Ed Enoch, an attorney in Augusta, Ga., who has been fielding calls from clients at small and mid-size local businesses about everything from handling religious exemptions to vaccine mandates.
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How dangerous is the Omicron variant?

By Reported by Melissa Davey and presented by Laura Murphy-Oates; produced by Karishma Luthria, Jane Lee and Joe Koning; mixing and sound design by Camilla Hannan; the executive producers are Gabrielle Jackson, Laura Murphy-Oates andMelanie Tait

The Omicron variant of Covid has prompted governments around the world to reintroduce border restrictions, with Australia shutting the border to southern Africa and delaying the reopening date for international students and visa holders. The federal government has called for calm, describing the variant as ‘manageable’, but what do we actually know about it?


Laura Murphy-Oates speaks to medical editor Melissa Davey about what scientists have discovered so far about Omicron and our evolving approach to combating Covid variants

Read more:

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U.S. picks up speed on tracking of virus variants after slow start

By Carla K. Johnson, Associated Press
  • After a slow start, the United States has improved its surveillance system for tracking new coronavirus variants such as omicron, boosting its capacity by tens of thousands of samples per week since early this year.
  • Contributing to the effort are nearly 70 state and local public health labs, which are sequencing 15,000 to 20,000 specimens each week.
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New Findings Show the Omicron Variant Spread Widely At a Faster Pace Than Initially Thought

By RAF CASERT / AP
  • New findings about the coronavirus’s omicron variant made it clear Tuesday that the emerging threat slipped into countries well before their defenses were up, as two distant nations announced their first cases and a third reported its presence before South African officials sounded the alarm.
  • The World Health Organization said South Africa first reported the variant to the U.N. health agency on Nov. 24.
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Why Omicron is the most worrying Covid variant yet – video explainer

The discovery of a new and potentially vaccine-resistant Covid variant has concerned governments and unnerved markets around the world. Omicron has prompted the return of border closures and mandatory testing and mask wearing as countries attempt to slow its spread.

The number of mutations on its spike protein - the part of the virus vaccines use to prime the immune system - has concerned scientists, but it will take weeks to determine the extent of the threat Omicron poses. The Guardian's science correspondent Linda Geddes explains

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Omicron Covid variant ‘present in Europe at least 10 days ago’

By Peter Beaumont
  • The disclosure of the presence of Omicron in Europe earlier than previously believed came as the European Union’s medical agency chief said on Tuesday it is ready to deal with the new Omicron variant, and that it will take two weeks to have an indication whether the current Covid-19 vaccines will be able to deal with it.
  • The Dutch health authority said it had found the Omicron variant in two local cases going back 11 days, showing it was already in western Europe’s heartland before the reports came out of South Africa on 24 November.
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Omicron was in Netherlands days earlier than first thought

By Raf Casert, Associated Press
  • Authorities in the eastern German city of Leipzig, meanwhile, said Tuesday they had confirmed an infection with the omicron variant in a 39-year-old man who had neither been abroad nor had contact with anyone who had been, news agency dpa reported.
  • The omicron variant was already in the Netherlands when South Africa alerted the World Health Organization about it last week, Dutch health authorities said Tuesday, adding to fear and confusion over the new version of the coronavirus in a weary world hoping it had left the worst of the pandemic behind.
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‘We’ve been failed’: five vulnerable people on their booster jab wait

By Clea Skopeliti and Rachel Obordo
  • Her 62-year-old daughter Anne who works as a nurse said: “I phoned her GP about a week ago to make sure she was still on the list to be seen, but the surgery doesn’t have any other information on when she might get the jab.
  • Anne is so concerned that she has given up waiting and is prepared to try and take her mum to be jabbed at her GP surgery: “I thought I should just get her booked in instead of waiting for someone to come to her,” she said.
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Making safe maternal healthcare a possibility in The Gambia

By Andrew Phifer
  • The Gambia Safe Labor & Delivery Training program will focus on the maternity ward of Kanifing General Hospital (KGH), a 500-bed hospital that provides secondary medical services to a population of more than 300,000 people.
  • The Safe Labor & Delivery Training program will promote infrastructural development and capacity building to equip a Gambian hospital with the necessary resources for improving patient care.
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This time we know the Covid risks. We have simply decided to manage them | Zoe Williams

By Zoe Williams
  • The new daily case rates this time last year were averaging nearly 16,000; this week’s daily average is around 43,000 .
  • But the shadow of the Omicron strain already underlines some certainties about the pandemic: the only measures that can avert new variants are decided at an international and national level – a dynamic push for global vaccination and a better social safety net to allow people to isolate.
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All hail Cat Jesus! The fantastic feline artist behind Benedict Cumberbatch’s latest biopic

By Jonathan Jones
  • It was created by the celebrated cartoonist of comical cats and Bethlem psychiatric hospital patient Louis Wain, whose art is about to go on show here.
  • This Victorian-born artist, who made his name gently mocking the human customs of the imperial age, burst out of the pedantic habits of mainstream British art in his hospital years.
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How well do face masks protect against coronavirus?

  • People who haven’t been fully vaccinated should continue to wear face masks in indoor public places and outdoors where there is a high risk of COVID-19 transmission, such as crowded events or large gatherings.
  • Yes. Face masks combined with other preventive measures, such as getting vaccinated, frequent hand-washing and physical distancing, can help slow the spread of the virus.
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Bidets are big, but do you really need one? Health experts weigh in.

By Angela Haupt
  • What’s less clear is whether they serve any medical purpose beyond that: While there’s some indication that they could, for example, be helpful for those with hemorrhoids or mobility issues, research isn’t conclusive, and there are concerns that bacteria could fester on the device; plus, users could be scalded if the water gets too hot.
  • She’s so smitten with the toilet attachment that sprays water to clean your bum that her family had one installed in each of their four bathrooms — and they’re shopping for a travel bidet, a water-bottle-sized contraption to use when they’re on the road.
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UK Covid live: No 10 refuses to back health chief’s call for people to avoid unnecessary socialising

By Andrew Sparrow
  • There will be a debate and vote in the Commons, statements from the Scottish and Welsh governments, and a press conference from Boris Johnson this afternoon, focusing on booster vaccines.
  • The new Covid restrictions for England announced by the government were relatively minimal compared with what they might have been - many countries have significantly tougher rules for Delta - but Harries gave a hint of of how scientists’ preferences are some way ahead of what politicians are willing to legislate for when she said it would better if avoided unnecessary socialising.
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With Federal Covid Sick Leave Gone, Workers Feel Pressure to Show Up at Work

By Rae Ellen Bichell
  • The law, which allows any employee to earn up to six days of paid sick leave per year and takes effect fully in January, says that when local, state or federal officials declare a public health emergency, employers must supplement workers’ accrued leave so an employee can take up to two weeks of paid sick leave for, in this case, covid-related reasons.
  • Jared Make, vice president of A Better Balance, a national legal nonprofit advocating for worker rights, has been pushing federal, state and local lawmakers for years to expand paid sick leave and has drafted model legislation.
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Strollout chosen as Macquarie dictionary’s 2021 word of the year

By Stephanie Convery
  • The Australian people have spoken and their opinion – for only the second time – is the same as the experts, with the colloquial noun “referring to the rollout of the Covid-19 vaccination program in Australia, with reference to the perceived lack of speed” taking both the people’s choice award and the judging committee’s selection.
  • The dictionary’s managing editor, Victoria Morgan, said: “Strollout really just shows the people’s dissatisfaction with the vaccine rollout.
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Work doesn’t need to a be a finish line you cross at the end of an exhausting week | Amanda Wallis and Gaynor Parkin

By Amanda Wallis and Gaynor Parkin
  • Addressing presenteeism involves addressing poor management, toxic workplace cultures, and socioeconomic trends and inequities that force people to prioritise hours worked over their own health and that of their colleagues.
  • We can achieve this state more deliberately, more of the time, by taking time off to rest and recover when it’s needed, leading to shorter illness periods and better health outcomes, and by looking after our wellbeing such that we experience lower stress and illness to begin with.
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S2 E6: Tom Watson, former Labour deputy leader | podcast

By Grace Dent, Leah Green, Emma Roberts, Cathy Drysdale, Sami El-Enany

Grace’s Comfort Eating guest this week is the former politician Tom Watson. The pair talk about his life – after she has to run to the kitchen to spit out the food he brought round. They talk about growing up on cheese toasties, the Jeremy Corbyn years, and how Watson, at the aged of 54, realised he has an eating disorder

New episodes of Comfort Eating with Grace Dent are released every Tuesday

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Pride, power and resilience: How activism helps undocumented immigrants cope with trauma

By Terry Greene Sterling in Maricopa county
  • About a year later, mother and daughter crossed the US-Mexico border, Rita says, joining relatives already settled in Maricopa county.
  • Cadenas became an activist, publicly opposing the sheriff and state immigration laws while advocating for affordable in-state tuition for undocumented college students and the passage of the Dream Act, which would provide a pathway to citizenship for law-abiding people who arrived in the US at a young age.
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Moderna boss predicts current vaccines may be less effective against Omicron covid

By Julia Kollewe and Graeme Wearden
  • Stéphane Bancel said while it would take two weeks to get data on how the existing vaccines perform against the new Covid variant – and whether it causes severe disease – it will take several months to tweak the current vaccines to tackle Omicron.
  • The chief executive of the US drugmaker Moderna has predicted that existing vaccines will be less effective against Omicron than they have been against the Delta version, sending global stock markets sharply lower.
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‘I Can Go Anywhere’: How Service Dogs Help Veterans With PTSD

By Stephanie O'Neill
  • Her nails clicking on the kitchen floor as she danced about, Lisa looked more like an exuberant puppy than the highly trained service animal that helps Clark-Gutierrez manage the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder.
  • Clark-Gutierrez’s husband, also an Air Force veteran, discovered the nonprofit group K9s for Warriors, which rescues dogs — many from kill shelters — and trains them to be service animals for veterans with PTSD.
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USC Kaufman alums turn their interdisciplinary college experience into a full-fledged art business

By USC News
  • That path helped them form their own artistic media company and brought them back to their alma mater, where the trio have been working with Kaufman students to help them blaze their own paths at USC.
  • As members of the inaugural class at USC Kaufman, Justin Epstein, Adam Agostino and Noah Guthier had to navigate a brand new educational experience at USC and blaze their own path.
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Covid-19: how worried should we be about Omicron? | podcast

By Presented and produced by Madeleine Finlay with Ian Sample and Anand Jagatia

Last week, a new variant of Covid-19 was detected by scientists in South Africa. Since then, additional cases have been reported beyond southern Africa, including Belgium, Canada, Israel, Australia and the UK. And with the WHO warning that the Omicron variant poses a very high global risk, scientists around the world are scrambling to uncover clues about its transmissibility and how effective the current coronavirus vaccines will be against it.

To find out what we do know about Omicron and what it could mean for the coming weeks and months, Madeleine Finlay spoke to the Guardian’s science editor, Ian Sample.

Archive: BBC; DW News; CBC News; Global News; CNBC Television

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Global Omicron COVID variant detections rise as experts seek answers

By Jim Wappes
  • With the number of countries reporting the Omicron (B.1.1.529) COVID-19 variant rising steadily and viral activity increasing in South Africa, the global health community is closely watching for new clues about whether other countries will see similar rises and if the variant will behave differently than earlier versions.
  • On Twitter today, South Africa's health ministry said it's not clear if Omicron is more transmissible, but within 2 weeks of its detection, it has outpaced Delta in Gauteng.
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An increased awareness of death during the COVID-19 pandemic may have spurred a surge in creativity in the workplace

By Beth Ellwood
  • Study authors Riki Takeuchi and his team wanted to investigate how a heightened awareness of death during the pandemic might have impacted employees, and in turn, organizations.
  • This suggests that death reflection may have helped employees respond actively and constructively to a heightened awareness of death during the pandemic.
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Amateur Boxing to Increased Risk of Brain Impairment and Early Onset of Dementia

By Neuroscience News
  • Amateur boxing is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment and earlier onset of dementia, according to a study carried out by Cardiff University.
  • “Our study therefore provides some of the best available evidence suggesting that amateur boxing is associated with clinically measurable long-term brain injury, manifested as earlier onset Alzheimer’s-like impairment.
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Why Some People Experience Early Onset Neurodegenerative Diseases

By Neuroscience News
  • Summary: A new study sheds light on the genetic causes of a range of neurodegenerative disorders, including ALS, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease, and determines factors that impact the age of onset as well as disease severity.
  • The research now holds potential to shed light on the genetic causes of multiple neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s and ALS, and to better determine factors that impact age of onset and severity of diseases like Huntington’s.
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Lincoln Riley named new USC football head coach

By USC News
  • LOS ANGELES -- Lincoln Riley, one of college football's most successful young coaches who won 85 percent of his games in five seasons at Oklahoma and led the Sooners to four Big 12 titles and four New Year's Six bowls with three College Football Playoff appearances, has been named the head coach at USC, athletic director Mike Bohn announced today (Nov. 28).
  • His Sooners were 37-7 (.841) in league play and won Big 12 championships in his first four years there as he became the first person to win outright Football Bowl Subdivision conference crowns in each of his first four seasons as a collegiate head coach.
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How the world is responding to the omicron variant

By Yamiche Alcindor
A growing number of nations imposed travel restrictions Monday to try to slow the spread of the new coronavirus variant, omicron. The moves came as more cases of the variant were confirmed internationally. But some warned the travel bans -- including those imposed by the U.S.-- would not be effective and could even be counterproductive. White House correspondent Yamiche Alcindor reports. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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How unresolved grief could haunt children who lost a parent or caregiver to COVID

By Sarah Varney, Kaiser Health News
The number of U.S. deaths from COVID-19 has surpassed 775,000. But left behind are tens of thousands of children -- some orphaned entirely -- after their parents or a grandparent who cared for them died. In this report co-produced with the NewsHour, Kaiser Health News correspondent Sarah Varney looks at the risks these grieving children face to their well-being, both in the short and long term. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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By Jamey Keaten, Associated Press
  • The World Health Organization warned Monday that the global risk from the omicron variant is “very high” based on the early evidence, saying the mutated coronavirus could lead to surges with “severe consequences.”
  • “The emergence of the omicron variant has fulfilled, in a precise way, the predictions of the scientists who warned that the elevated transmission of the virus in areas with limited access to vaccine would speed its evolution,” said Dr. Richard Hatchett, head of CEPI, one of the founders of the U.N.-backed global vaccine sharing initiative COVAX.
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MGH expert responds to 100,000 overdose deaths

  • WAKEMAN: One meta and ongoing issue, even pre-COVID, was this growing unpredictability in the drug supply and the background of decades of policy approaches which have not adequately supported or funded effective treatment or harm reduction interventions to reduce overdose death.
  • But I think the reality is that those are baby steps while we’re in the middle of a tsunami of overdose death, and we’re still so far from where we need to be in terms of access to medication treatment.
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CDC recommends COVID boosters for all adults as omicron variant spreads

By Jamey Keaten, Associated Press
  • The World Health Organization warned Monday that the global risk from the omicron variant is “very high” based on the early evidence, saying the mutated coronavirus could lead to surges with “severe consequences.”
  • “The emergence of the omicron variant has fulfilled, in a precise way, the predictions of the scientists who warned that the elevated transmission of the virus in areas with limited access to vaccine would speed its evolution,” said Dr. Richard Hatchett, head of CEPI, one of the founders of the U.N.-backed global vaccine sharing initiative COVAX.
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AI Studies the Emotions Aroused by Music, and Our Way of Perceiving Them

By Neuroscience News
  • In order to better understand our opinions about emotions in music, the MTG, led by Emilia Gómez, co-author of the study, is collecting data using citizen science through project TROMPA (Towards Richer Online Music Public-Domain Archives).
  • In a recent publication in the journal IEEE Signal Processing Magazine, researchers with the Music Technologies Research Group (MTG) at Pompeu Fabra University, together with scientists from the Academia Sinica in Taiwan, the University of Hong Kong, and Durham University in the United Kingdom, among others, propose a new conceptualization framework that helps to characterize music in terms of emotions and thus build models that are better adapted to people’s characteristics.
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Researchers Develop Wireless Networks That Allow Brain Circuits to Be Controlled Remotely Through the Internet

By Neuroscience News
  • It can remotely control numerous neural implants and laboratory tools in real-time or in a scheduled way without direct human interactions,” said Professor Jae-Woong Jeong of the School of Electrical Engineering at KAIST and a senior author of the study.
  • They can remotely perform large-scale neuroscience experiments in animals deployed in multiple countries,” said one of the lead authors, Dr. Raza Qazi, a researcher with KAIST and the University of Colorado, Boulder.
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University Park Slow Jams collaboration raises awareness of local traffic dangers

By USC News
  • In the University Park neighborhood, that's more than a startling statistic: It's a reality that has plagued the area -- and sparked a new collaboration between USC's Kid Watch program and the social action group Public Matters .
  • After Estrada and her partner, Mike Blockstein, spoke to USC classes, Public Matters identified the 3.8-square-mile University Park neighborhood as a high-risk traffic danger area and receive a grant from the Good Neighbors Campaign to launch University Park Slow Jams in partnership with Kid Watch.
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Study Reveals a Protein’s Key Contribution to Heterogeneity of Neurons

By Neuroscience News
  • A new study by neuroscientists at The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory of MIT shows how just one protein situated on the front lines of neural connections, or synapses, can profoundly change how some neurons communicate and implement plasticity.
  • Because tonic neurons have those reserves, the study shows, they can step up glutamate release when receptors across the synapse begin to falter, a plasticity known as presynaptic homeostatic potentiation (PHP).
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Which Side Is Which? How the Brain Perceives Borders

By Neuroscience News
  • “What we found is that the earliest signals on border ownership occur in neurons in the deep layers of the brain’s cortex,” says Franken, who is a physician-scientist and supported by a K99 Pathway to Independence Award from the National Institutes of Health.
  • But other scientists hypothesized the importance of the “feedback” pathway, in which downstream areas of the brain must first process information, and then send these clues back to neurons in upstream areas, to help them figure out border ownership.
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Here’s What COVID-19 Vaccine Makers Are Doing to Fight Omicron

By Alice Park
  • Both Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech developed their COVID-19 vaccines using mRNA technology, which allowed them to quickly move from getting the right genetic sequence of the SARS-CoV-2 virus and inserting it into their shots to generate a robust immune response.
  • BioNTech, which developed its vaccine with pharmaceutical giant Pfizer, began studying whether its existing two-dose shot continues to protect against Omicron, and a company spokesperson said those results could be available in about two weeks.
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Covid: UK aims for 500,000 jabs a day in bid to outpace Omicron variant

By Rowena Mason and Andrew Gregory
  • The NHS is set to confirm an expansion of the vaccine programme this week after the government’s advisers said all adults should be offered boosters and made the surprise recommendation of a three- rather than six-month wait after a second dose.
  • Ministers are targeting a return to half a million UK Covid jabs a day as the waiting time for boosters was cut to three months in a bid to outpace the Omicron variant that scientists believe is already spreading in the community.
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A new psychological concept called “digressive victimhood” helps explain how dominant groups rebuff claims of discrimination

By Eric W. Dolan
  • We had been noticing several examples of what we came to term digressive victimhood — members of dominant groups (e.g., White Americans) responding to charges of discrimination by simultaneously claiming victimhood and changing the topic of conversation (e.g., responding to accusations of racism with claims that their free speech was threatened),” said lead researcher Felix Danbold, an assistant professor of organizational behavior at University College London.
  • To examine whether digressive victimhood was favored in relation to other social issues, the researchers conducted a second study with 1,170 White participants, who listened to an audio clip from a purported podcast describing protests at a university in response to White students wearing “racially insensitive costumes” at a party.
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COVID-19 vaccines may have saved 500,000 lives in Europe

By Jim Wappes
  • A pair of new studies in Eurosurveillance shed new light on infections, severe cases, and deaths averted by COVID-19 vaccination, one suggesting that the shots saved about 470,000 people 60 and older in Europe and one estimating that 445,000 infections, 79,000 hospitalizations, 9,800 intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, and 22,000 fewer deaths were prevented in Italy alone.
  • A study led by World Health Organization (WHO) researchers estimated the number of people 60 and older saved by COVID-19 vaccination in the 33 countries of the WHO European Region from vaccine rollout in December 2020 to November 2021.
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Is the NHS in a position to handle the Covid Omicron variant?

By Denis Campbell Health policy editor
  • “The chief executive said that an advantage of having had that sudden massive increase last January was that we know what’s needed now if numbers go up significantly again.”
  • He said: “The chief executive of a district general hospital told me today that they were going through plans for how they would expand critical care capacity, and their general respiratory support capacity, because that’s exactly what they needed to do last January when we had over 34,000 cases.
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New omicron variant brings COVID-19 vaccine inequity ‘home to roost’

By Maria Cheng, Associated Press
  • Last week, COVAX sent out a news release praising a European Union pledge to ship 100 million vaccines to Africa by the end of the year — but only 1/20 of that amount was actually on planes.
  • “The virus is a ruthless opportunist, and the inequity that has characterized the global response has now come home to roost,” said Dr. Richard Hatchett, CEO of CEPI, one of the groups behind the U.N.-backed COVAX shot-sharing initiative.
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News Scan for Nov 29, 2021

By Jim Wappes
  • SARS-CoV-2 reinfections in Qatar were 90% less likely than primary infections to lead to hospitalization or death, finds a research letter last week in the New England Journal of Medicine ( NEJM ).
  • The findings come from a study of nearly 40,000 hospitalized COVID-19–positive patients seen at seven hospitals in the United States and four university hospitals in Western Europe, according to an RSNA news release today.
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HEALTHY BOUNDARIES: 12 tips for setting them with family and friends

By Mia Barnes
No one wakes up in the morning and hopes they’ll upset their loved ones or start a fight. You want to get along with the people closest to you, but you might have a complicated history with some people that results in unhealthy relationships. Here are 12 tips for setting healthy boundaries with family and friends. With a bit of work, everyone can get more joy and fulfillment from each interaction. Consider your needs What do you want from your The post HEALTHY BOUNDARIES: 12 tips for

Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
[…]Read more >Similar articles >
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The Guardian view on vaccines and Omicron: upping the antibodies | Editorial

By Editorial
  • Between January and September, there were 34,474 deaths from Covid in England of unvaccinated people aged 10 or over, compared with 4,308 deaths of those who had received two vaccine doses (an alternative set of figures, also published by the Office for National Statistics and based on a different dataset, gives the totals of 40,966 unvaccinated deaths, compared with 5,104 double-vaccinated).
  • Among 12- to 15-year-old children, the vaccination rate is 39.1% (compared with 67.4% of adults who have had at least one dose, although the risk posed to children by Covid-19 is lower).
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Covid: two schools tested as health officials battle to contain Omicron variant

By Robert Booth Social affairs correspondent
  • Essex county council contact tracers established the link to Larchwood Primary school after identifying cases of the “variant of concern” on Sunday in the nearby Trinity Church and a branch of the KFC fried chicken restaurant on Brentwood High Street.
  • Pupils and staff at a primary school in Brentwood are being tested for the Omicron Covid-19 variant amid a widening outbreak in the Essex town linked to cases in Nottingham and travel to southern Africa.
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Julian David obituary

By Isabel de Salis
  • My friend, mentor and analyst, Julian David, who has died aged 88, was a psychoanalyst in the UK and in South Africa, where he worked with Sir Laurens van der Post to set up a Jungian training institute for medical professionals at the end of apartheid.
  • In London through friends and colleagues he met Laurens van der Post, who invited him to help set up a training institute in Cape Town towards the end of apartheid, introducing medical professionals to Jungian psychology.
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Nations rush to contain COVID omicron variant

By Raf Cassert, Associated Press
  • Travelers infected with the new version have turned up in a widening circle of countries over the past few days, including now Spain, and cases in Portugal and Scotland have raised fears that the variant may already be spreading locally.
  • Taking an act-now-ask-questions-later approach, countries around the world slammed their doors shut again to try to keep the new omicron variant at bay Monday as more cases of the mutant coronavirus emerged and scientists raced to figure out just how dangerous it might be.
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Some Meds You Take May Increase Your Blood Pressure

  • "The risk of [drugs] raising blood pressure may be simply overlooked, particularly for patients using these additional medications for many years," said study author Dr. Timothy Anderson.
  • MONDAY, Nov. 29, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 1 in 5 people with hypertension may be unintentionally taking a drug for another condition that causes their blood pressure to climb even higher, a new study suggests.
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Estudio muestra factibilidad de predecir convulsiones con dispositivos de pulsera en personas que sufren de epilepsia

By Sharon Theimer
ROCHESTER, Minnesota: Pese a la existencia de medicamentos, cirugías y dispositivos para neuroestimulación, muchas personas con epilepsia continúan presentando convulsiones. La naturaleza impredecible de las convulsiones es sumamente restrictiva, pero si se pudiese predecir las convulsiones, la gente con epilepsia podría cambiar sus actividades, tomar un medicamento de acción rápida o encender el neuroestimulador para evitar la convulsión o minimizar sus efectos. Un nuevo estudio publicado en Scientific Reports (Informes Científicos) por investigadores de Mayo Clinic y otros colaboradores internacionales descubrió que en los pacientes que […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Biden: New COVID Variant ‘Cause for Concern,’ Not Panic

  • President Joe Biden said Monday that available vaccines are expected to provide some protection against the new Omicron COVID-19 variant, and federal health officials are working to gather more information on its potency before the first cases are detected in the United States.
  • Biden praised the South African health community for quickly notifying the world of this variant, and he said the travel ban was put in place to provide more time for U.S. residents to get vaccinated and boosted.
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Sarcoma Cancer Care | The Role of the Radiation Oncologist – Curtiland Deville, M.D.

By Johns Hopkins Medicine
Curtiland Deville, M.D. talked about the role of the radiation oncologist in the patient’s journey. https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/kimmel_cancer_center/cancers_we_treat/sarcoma/The Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center created six videos to provide information and comfort to those newly diagnosed with sarcoma. Hear from a surgical oncologist, a medical oncologist and a radiation oncologist about the different aspects of treatment and how the clinical team works together to provide care. Another video reviews the ancillary staff and support programs available to help you cope with nutrition, side effects, rehabilitation, and mental […]Read more >Similar articles >

New Study Explores if a Vaccine Can Prevent Breast Cancer

By Alice Park
  • Ultimately, he says, if this early phase indicates the vaccine is safe and shows promise in triggering an anti-cancer immune response, the study will expand to include women at high risk of developing triple negative cancer, but who haven’t been diagnosed yet, to see if immunizing them could help prevent the cancer from occurring in the first place.
  • Thomas Budd, staff physician at the Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Center, is leading a potentially ground-breaking study of a breast cancer vaccine that could help women produce antibodies and other immune cells that protect them from getting cancer.
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Omicron Updates From Around the World

  • The new Omicron coronavirus variant, which has been detected in several countries in recent days, will spread widely across the world and inevitably reach the U.S., Anthony Fauci, MD, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said Monday.
  • The scientists in South Africa said they expect more breakthrough cases in people who are fully vaccinated, though they aren’t yet sure whether the variant causes severe disease.
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How to cover Omicron and other COVID variants of concern

By Bara Vaida and Tara Haelle
  • Much of the post-Thanksgiving media coverage has focused on Omicron, the SARS-CoV-2 virus variant detected circulating in South Africa and labeled a variant of concern (VOC) by the World Health Organization on Nov. 26.
  • The WHO added Omicron to the VOC list based on available evidence, including the fact that the variant contains more than 30 mutations in the spike protein, the primary antigen that all the WHO’s approved COVID-19 vaccines rely on to invoke an immune response.
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Sarcoma Cancer Care | The Role of the Orthopaedic Oncologist Jonathan Forsberg, M.D.

By Johns Hopkins Medicine
Jonathan Forsberg, M.D. talked about the role of the orthopedic oncologist in the patient’s journey. https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/kimmel_cancer_center/cancers_we_treat/sarcoma/The Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center created six videos to provide information and comfort to those newly diagnosed with sarcoma. Hear from a surgical oncologist, a medical oncologist and a radiation oncologist about the different aspects of treatment and how the clinical team works together to provide care. Another video reviews the ancillary staff and support programs available to help you cope with nutrition, side effects, rehabilitation, and mental […]Read more >Similar articles >

Sarcoma Cancer Care | Gwendolyn Ihrie’s Story

By Johns Hopkins Medicine
The Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center created six videos to provide information and comfort to those newly diagnosed with sarcoma. Hear from a surgical oncologist, a medical oncologist and a radiation oncologist about the different aspects of treatment and how the clinical team works together to provide care. Another video reviews the ancillary staff and support programs available to help you cope with nutrition, side effects, rehabilitation, and mental health, as well as integrative health practices that offer social connection and other benefits. Two sarcoma cancer patients tell their stories with insight and hope. #SarcomaCancer […]Read more >Similar articles >

Sarcoma Cancer Care | Jacqueline Greer’s Story

By Johns Hopkins Medicine
The Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center created six videos to provide information and comfort to those newly diagnosed with sarcoma. Hear from a surgical oncologist, a medical oncologist and a radiation oncologist about the different aspects of treatment and how the clinical team works together to provide care. Another video reviews the ancillary staff and support programs available to help you cope with nutrition, side effects, rehabilitation, and mental health, as well as integrative health practices that offer social connection and other benefits. Two sarcoma cancer patients tell their stories with insight and hope. #SarcomaCancer […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Harvard epidemiologist awaits clearer picture on Omicron

  • Earlier this month, Mary Bushman, a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School, co-authored a paper that modeled the impact of hypothetical variants on populations practicing a combination of masking, distancing, vaccination, and other COVID safety measures.
  • GAZETTE: The new study, published in Cell, says that variants demonstrating both greater transmissibility and an ability to escape the immune system (i.e., cause breakthrough infections), rather than either trait in isolation, are the ones we should worry about most.
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South African scientists explore vaccines’ effectiveness against Omicron

By Ian Sample Science editor
  • Scientists in South Africa have begun crucial work to assess how well Covid vaccines hold up against the newly emerged Omicron variant which has been detected in more than a dozen countries since it was formally reported last week.
  • These will then be exposed to antibody-carrying blood plasma from vaccinated people and others who have recovered from Covid infection to see if they neutralise the virus.
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Sarcoma Cancer Care | Support That Makes a Difference – Pamela Goetz, OPN-CG

By Johns Hopkins Medicine
The Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center created six videos to provide information and comfort to those newly diagnosed with sarcoma. Hear from a surgical oncologist, a medical oncologist and a radiation oncologist about the different aspects of treatment and how the clinical team works together to provide care. Another video reviews the ancillary staff and support programs available to help you cope with nutrition, side effects, rehabilitation, and mental health, as well as integrative health practices that offer social connection and other benefits. Two sarcoma cancer patients tell their stories with insight and hope. #SarcomaCancer […]Read more >Similar articles >

Sarcoma Cancer Care | The Role of the Medical Oncologist – Karim Boudadi, M.D.

By Johns Hopkins Medicine
Karim Boudadi, M.D. talks about the medical oncologist’s role in the patient’s journey.The Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center created six videos to provide information and comfort to those newly diagnosed with sarcoma. Hear from a surgical oncologist, a medical oncologist and a radiation oncologist about the different aspects of treatment and how the clinical team works together to provide care. Another video reviews the ancillary staff and support programs available to help you cope with nutrition, side effects, rehabilitation, and mental health, as well as integrative health practices that offer social connection and other […]Read more >Similar articles >
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UK’s minimum gap for Covid booster jabs to be halved to three months

By Jamie Grierson, Rowena Mason, Peter Walker ,Andrew Gregory and Linda Geddes
  • All adults in the UK should be offered booster jabs from just three months after their second vaccinations as the government’s advisers speeded up the programme to limit the spread of the Omicron variant.
  • The advisers said adults aged 18 to 39 should be offered boosters and recommended cutting the gap between second and third doses from at least six months to at least three months.
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England’s new Covid measures still leave clinically vulnerable people out in the cold | Frances Ryan

By Frances Ryan
  • The measures announced, though, were hardly significant: for example, introducing mandatory masks in shops and on public transport only brings England in line with what the other home nations have long been doing, and hospitality venues such as pubs and restaurants aren’t included in the new rules.
  • Previously, 3.7 million clinically vulnerable people in England were asked to shield in their homes, and were given some government support to do so.
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WATCH LIVE: As new variant spreads, Biden pushes shots and not restrictions

By Zeke Miller, Associated Press
  • President Joe Biden will urge Americans to get vaccinated and receive a booster shot as he seeks to quell concerns Monday over the new COVID-19 variant omicron, but won’t immediately push for more restrictions to stop its spread, his chief medical adviser said.
  • Speaking on ABC’s “Good Morning America,” Fauci said scientists hope to know in the next week or two how well the existing COVID-19 vaccines protect against the varian t, and how dangerous it is compared to earlier strains.
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UK science advisers brace for hundreds of confirmed Omicron Covid cases

By Nicola Davis and Ian Sample
  • Prof Michael Tildesley, an expert in the mathematical modelling of infectious disease at the University of Warwick and a member of the modelling group Spi-M that advises the government, said: “It is worth remembering, though, that there is a lag between individuals being infected and cases being reported, so at the point that cases are detected, it is likely that there are more infections in the community.”
  • The UK is one of the world’s busiest air transport hubs and, like South Africa, has a large genomics sector to determine the variants involved in infections – increasing the probability both of importing and detecting cases.
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COPD: what you need to know

By Andrew Phifer
  • “Patients with COPD have reduced lung function, and when they get COVID pneumonia they are at high risk of complications like being admitted to the ICU,” said Dr. Nicola Hanania, a pulmonary and critical care physician at Baylor.
  • “The disease is serious because it can increase the risk of having what we call exacerbations or flare ups, which may increase medical visits or hospital admissions,” Hanania said.
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Mayo Clinic Minute: Shaving too close can cause skin problems

By Jason Howland
  • But Mayo Clinic dermatologists say shaving too close to the skin can cause problems for some people.
  • "If you go to trim or shave your hair, particularly if you're a man or particularly if you are skin of color and a male, it's very easy for those hairs if they are trimmed closely to turn in on themselves and then pierce the skin," says Dr. Dawn Davis, a Mayo Clinic dermatologist.
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