May 16, 2022

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Pregnant and Have IBD? A GI Doc’s Help Can Be Crucial

  • In a study, published in the journal Crohn’s & Colitis 360, lead author Traci Kazmerski, MD, and her colleagues at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center found that women with IBD often worry about their reproductive health and typically turn to gastroenterologists for questions and concerns.
  • Kane says the findings, which are in line with other research, confirm what she’s seen in her own practice and highlight the critical role a GI specialist can play in helping women with IBD deal with pregnancy and reproductive health.
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Fungal infections are next chapter in reporting on superbugs

By Bara Vaida
  • Hospital overuse of antibiotics, especially during the first year of the pandemic when there were few options for treating patients, plus the use of steroids to treat lung inflammation caused by COVID-19, both contributed to increase s in resistant fungal infections with high mortality rates.
  • Deadly antimicrobial resistant fungal infection cases, already rising in nursing homes and hospitals before the pandemic, accelerated during the past two years, according to the CDC.
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Our Brains Learn From Mistakes and Can Track Performance

  • These electrodes were in a region of the brain known as the medial frontal cortex behind the forehead, which plays a key role in tracking performance and managing mental skills.
  • Our ability to learn new things and adjust our approach based on failure and success can be credited to a multi-tasking group of neurons, or messenger cells in our brain, suggest the results of a series of new lab tests.
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A MORNING WITH LUPINES AND FOXGLOVES: A garden goes nowhere, it never arrives, it never leaves

By Emily L Quint Freeman
After such a week, buffeted by events that have shaken the very foundation of women’s rights, I sought out a quiet morning walking by a wooded stream and hanging out in the spring garden. I did a spot of planting, followed by sitting with a pot of Genmaicha tea. This Japanese tea combines green tea leaves and roasted brown rice, which gives it a unique nutty flavour. When I am quiet and alone, wildlife approaches, flutters and dances on the The post A MORNING WITH LUPINES AND

Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
[…]Read more >Similar articles >
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Four new cases of monkeypox identified in the UK, bringing total to seven

By PA Media
  • “We are particularly urging men who are gay and bisexual to be aware of any unusual rashes or lesions and to contact a sexual health service without delay.
  • Due to the recent rise in case numbers and uncertainties about how the infections were transmitted, UKHSA has said it is working closely with NHS partners to establish whether there have been any more cases in recent weeks, and with international partners to examine whether other countries have seen a similar rise in monkeypox.
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How stress might help reduce dementia and alzheimer’s.

By mdbownds@wisc.edu (Deric Bownds)
  • Fauzia points to work by Avezov and collaborators (open source) showing that the accumulation of aggregates of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum of brain cells that is associated with dementia and Alzheimer's can be reversed by stressing cells with chemicals or heat, activating molecular chaperones that in turn untangle or remove protein aggregates.
  • Aggregates’ formation is antagonised by molecular chaperones, with cytoplasmic machinery resolving insoluble protein aggregates.
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Estados todavía deben usar el dinero federal que recibieron para zanjar disparidades de salud por covid

By Phil Galewitz, Kaiser Health News and Lauren Weber and Sam Whitehead
La administración Biden anunció en marzo de 2021 que invertiría $2,250 millones para hacer frente a las disparidades de salud por covid, la mayor iniciativa de financiación federal diseñada específicamente para ayudar a las comunidades desatendidas más afectadas por el virus. Dos meses después, los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades (CDC) concedieron subvenciones a los departamentos de salud estatales y a unas 60 agencias de salud de ciudades y condados. Debían destinar el dinero a controlar la propagación de covid entre personas de grupos raciales y étnicos minoritarios en mayor riesgo, y personas que viven en zonas […]Read more >Similar articles >
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We need a definitive exit from our Covid-19 pandemic. Here’s the roadmap | Eric Topol

By Eric Topol
  • The only new vaccine in the hopper is an Omicron booster, but since that is based on the BA.1 variant, it may not provide much protection against what we are seeing now (BA.2.12.1 has reduced cross-immunity) or where the virus will be come this summer when that vaccine may become available.
  • All of this is tied to the marked evolution of the virus, and we yet lack any data on vaccine effectiveness versus the BA.2.12.1 variant, soon to be dominant here.
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Procedimiento cardíaco para disminuir riesgo de accidente cerebrovascular debe controlar fugas pequeñas

By Sharon Theimer
Rochester, Minnesota. Las fugas después del cierre del apéndice auricular izquierdo son más importantes de lo que se creía, dice un nuevo estudio de Mayo Clinic. El estudio muestra una relación entre una fuga, aunque sea pequeña, y un riesgo entre 10 y 15 por ciento mayor de sufrir un evento adverso. Un comunicado de prensa del Colegio Americano de Cardiología describe más a fondo el estudio y los resultados publicados en su revista JACC: Clinical Electrophysiology (Revista del Colegio Americano de Cardiología: electrofisiología clínica). El apéndice auricular izquierdo es una bolsa pequeña de forma irregular, ubicada en el lado izquierdo […]Read more >Similar articles >
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E-cigarettes ‘as safe as nicotine patches’ for pregnant smokers trying to quit

By Nicola Davis
  • “Many pregnant smokers find it difficult to quit with current stop smoking medications including nicotine patches and continue to smoke throughout pregnancy,” said Dr Francesca Pesola, an author of the new study who is based at Queen Mary University in London.
  • Only a small number of participants provided saliva samples to confirm smoking abstinence at the end of pregnancy, but once those who used non-allocated products were excluded, the team found higher rates of abstinence among the e-cigarette group.
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Ukraine atrocities could spark greater focus on international justice

By Karen Gail Feldscher
May 16, 2022 – The war in Ukraine could be a watershed moment for furthering meaningful international justice, according to experts from Harvard University. In an April 18 Harvard Kennedy School (HKS) podcast called “PolicyCast,” Patrick Vinck, research director of the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative and an assistant professor in Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health’s Department of Global Health and Population, along with HKS’s Kathryn Sikkink, maintained that, with renewed international support, the International Criminal Court can reduce war crimes and help usher in a more accountable world order. Even if Russian leader Vladimir […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Immunotherapy may play role in treating nonmetastatic gastroesophageal cancer

By Joe Dangor
  • Dr. Yoon and his colleagues performed a clinical trial to evaluate whether adding an immunotherapy called pembrolizumab to standard chemoradiation and surgery for patients with gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma might increase the number of patients who experienced complete tumor eradication in the original location and in nearby lymph nodes.
  • "The current standard of care for patients with nonmetastatic gastroesophageal cancer involves preoperative chemotherapy plus radiation and subsequent surgical resection of the primary cancer and surrounding lymph nodes," says Harry Yoon, M.D., a medical oncologist at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center.
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How timing your meals right can benefit your health

By Anna Berrill
  • A balanced plate, Lambert adds, should include a handful of carbs (rice, pasta, spelt, barley, for example), an outstretched handful of protein (chicken, salmon, pulses, tofu), two handfuls of veg (variety is good), and a thumb-sized portion of fat (olive oil for cooking), but how many meals you choose to eat, and their size, comes down to personal preference, lifestyle, and health goals.
  • It’s the latter Hyde has adopted, consuming food within a 10-hour time window and fasting for 14 hours overnight – “Some people will start at 8am and finish at 6pm, others start at 10am and finish at 8pm” – to improve her metabolism and gut health.
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Verbal cues of authenticity are linked to positive social and business outcomes, according to new research

By Patricia Y. Sanchez
  • Researchers followed up on these results in Study 2 by assessing how verbal authenticity in TED talk speakers is related to viewer impressions and online impact.
  • New research published in Social Psychological and Personality Science found that high verbal authenticity is associated with positive interpersonal impressions, increased social engagement, and more entrepreneurial success.
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Past Lead Exposure Shrank IQ Scores for Millions of Americans

By Theresa Sullivan Barger
  • More than half of the U.S. population alive today was exposed to leaded gas exhaust in childhood — collectively stealing more than 824 million IQ points, say the authors of a recent study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences .
  • Americans born before 1996, when lead was removed from gas, may be at greater risk for lead-related health problems such as faster aging of the brain, Reuben says.
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States Have Yet to Spend Hundreds of Millions of Federal Dollars to Tackle Covid Health Disparities

By Phil Galewitz, Kaiser Health News and Lauren Weber and Sam Whitehead
  • Despite the need to address these issues, the Riverside County health department in California has spent about $700,000 of its $23.4 million grant, which is separate from the state health department’s funds.
  • A year later — with covid having killed 1 million people in the U.S. since the start of the pandemic and hospitalizing millions more — little of the money has been used, according to a KHN review of about a dozen state and county agencies’ grants.
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Signs You Have High-Functioning Anxiety

By schneik4
  • “The term high functioning anxiety describes an individual who, despite feeling anxious, seems able to effectively manage the demands of day-to-day life,” says psychologist Adam Borland, PsyD .
  • “With high functioning anxiety, there tends to be more of a fight response, where an individual pushes themself to work harder in order to combat the anxiety,” says Dr. Borland.
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If You Stand Like Superman or Wonder Woman, Would You Feel Stronger?

By Neuroscience News
  • Summary: A new meta-analysis study reviews the effects of body posture on positive self-perception, reporting a dominant pose or strong upright posture can help people feel, and behave, more confidently.
  • “ Dominance and prestige: Meta-analytic review of experimentally induced body position effects on behavioral, self-report, and physiological dependent variables” by Robert Körner et al.
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I live with chronic pain – people like me need support as well as medication | Lucy Pasha-Robinson

By Lucy Pasha-Robinson
  • It offered the kind of joined-up care that so many suffering from chronic conditions are desperate for, and it was the first time anyone had considered how my pain was affecting my mental health, which it was, greatly.
  • In 2020, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) suggested that patients with chronic primary pain – where the cause for the underlying pain is unclear – should be offered “supervised group exercise programmes, some types of psychological therapy, or acupuncture”.
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After the Pandemic Hit Nursing Homes Hard, California Lawmakers Push to Tighten Licensing Rules

By Samantha Young
  • In July 2016, state regulators denied a license to Rechnitz — who had purchased the Windsor Redding Care Center, where Arthur Trenerry died — citing 265 health and safety code violations at his other facilities in the previous three years.
  • Investigations by news organizations CalMatters and LAist last year found that at least two California nursing home operators without licenses were running dozens of facilities even though officials at the state Department of Public Health had declared them unfit to do so.
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Artery stiffness may predict Type 2 diabetes risk better than BP and standard risk factors

  • DALLAS, May 16, 2022 — Arterial stiffness was a better predictor of future risk of Type 2 diabetes than blood pressure, and people with a combination of high blood pressure and stiffer arteries had the highest risk of developing diabetes, according to new research published today in Hypertension, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Heart Association.
  • More research is needed to determine the association among Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and arterial stiffness, and to provide insight into future prevention strategies to reduce the risk of Type 2 diabetes.
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#207 – AMA #35: “Anti-Aging” Drugs — NAD, metformin, & rapamycin

By Peter Attia
  • “What I think you really want is something you can measure that is predictive at either the individual or the population level of future health outcomes, mortality, certainly, but also functional outcomes, disease risk, things like that” says Matt
  • They first discuss aging biomarkers and epigenetic clocks before breaking down the advantages and limitations of the most common experimental models being used today to study aging and pharmacological possibilities for extending lifespan.
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Grad’s startup gives second life to students’ collegiate gear

By USC News
  • When I began to get an overwhelming amount of messages on Instagram from students wanting to sell their college gear on our platform, I knew then it was time to move onto bigger things to scale our efforts," Garcia said.
  • When Patricia Garcia graduates with her M.S. in Product Development Engineering from USC Viterbi this year, she will be the proud owner of a variety of Trojan gear and merchandise.
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Bed shop charged a cancellation fee after giving bad advice

By Zoe Wood

A reader says they were told a frame would fit up their stairs, but this turned out not to be the case

I am 80 years old and recently lost my wife of 54 years. I wanted to replace our bed and in March I ordered a small 4ft double from HSL in Bristol.

The salesperson was helpful and assured me the bed would fit up the stairwell of my 1932 semi-detached house.

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy to address American universities Monday on future of higher ed in Ukraine

By USC News
The Association of American Universities will livestream an address by Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy at 8 a.m. PDT Monday, May 16. Zelenskyy will speak about how American universities and Ukrainian officials and educators can work together to help rebuild and transform his country’s higher education sector. He also will outline his vision for Ukraine and speak about the Ukrainian Global University, which brings together an international network of institutions to help displaced Ukrainian students and scholars continue their education and research. A Q&A will follow his remarks. Founded in 1900, the AAU is composed of […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Using Virtual Reality for Anger Control

By Neuroscience News
  • An immersive virtual-reality anger control training program can reduce the level of anger provoked, according to a new study published in the peer-reviewed journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking.
  • “In Anger Exposure Training, managed expression reduced the level of anger provoked by angry expression in both the high and low aggression groups, concluded the investigators.
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AI Predicts Infant Age and Gender Based on Temperament

By Neuroscience News
  • A new study in PLOS ONE used machine learning to analyze temperament data on 4,438 babies in an attempt to classify the infants by gender and age.
  • “It is at least suggestive of a picture where temperament begins to differentiate by gender in a more powerful way around age one,” said Maria Gartstein, lead author of the study and a professor of psychology at Washington State University.
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Oral health is justice for all

By Richard Rodriguez
  • Fifty years later in 2021, the ADA, coordinating with a group of allied organized dentistry groups, wrote in opposition of including dental care in Medicare Part B, specifically, and offered a counter-proposal, including a means-tested program to offer care to the lowest-income seniors.
  • Yet, two days prior to publication, President Joe Biden gave the State of the Union Address without mentioning dental health, even though adding dental coverage to Medicare was the top priority among voters during the final negotiations of the Build Back Better Agenda with more than 80 percent public support.
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A Study Reveals One of the Reasons Why Neurons Die in Parkinson’s Patients

By Neuroscience News
  • “ Deficiency of Parkinson’s Related Protein DJ-1 Alters Cdk5 Signaling and Induces Neuronal Death by Aberrant Cell Cycle Re-entry ” by Raquel Requejo et al.
  • A study carried out by a research team at the University of Cordoba has revealed, in mice, one of the reasons for this neuronal loss: the key lies in the protein called DJ1, whose relationship with Parkinson’s disease had already been demonstrated, although until now its exact function was unclear.
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What Makes Some More Afraid of Change Than Others?

By Neuroscience News
  • “Our study provides interesting and important evidence that some of the behavior differences could be led by gene expression,” said LSU Department of Biological Sciences Assistant Professor Christine Lattin, who is the lead author on the paper published by PLOS ONE today.
  • For example, when wildlife are presented with something new in their environment, the genes in their brains respond, helping them process the information, compare it to past experience and decide whether they should approach or avoid the novel object,” Lattin said.
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Children With History of Maltreatment Could Undergo an Early Maturation of the Immune System

By Neuroscience News
  • The team analyzed the behavior of the secretory immunoglobulin A (s-IgA) through saliva—a less invasive biological sample compared to blood tests—in acute psychosocial stress in children and adolescents, so as to explore the potential variability according to the developmental stage and history of child maltreatment.
  • “ Secretory immunoglobulin A (s-IgA) reactivity to acute psychosocial stress in children and adolescents: The influence of pubertal development and history of maltreatment ” by Laia Marques-Feixa et al.
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Psychologists accounted for almost 5% of suicides among healthcare professionals in 2018

By Mane Kara-Yakoubian
  • In this work, Tiffany Li and colleagues specifically examined suicide rates among psychologists as compared to other health professions by referring to 2003-2018 data in the National Violent Death Reporting System.
  • A study published in American Psychologist examined the suicide rates of psychologists between 2003 and 2018, identifying 159 cases of psychologist suicide in the National Violent Death Reporting System.
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My burnout is born of a health system that treats the emergency department as a panacea | Stephen Parnis

By Stephen Parnis
  • Emergency physicians have been talking about hospital overcrowding for more than 20 years, and burnout is nothing new among many of my medical, nursing and allied colleagues who have given so much to caring for people in the worst moments of their lives.
  • I am dealing with burnout, and it has taken many months for me to realise it.
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Jeremy Hunt ‘ignored’ NHS staff shortages while health secretary

By Andrew Gregory Health editor
  • Promoting his new book, Zero: Eliminating Unnecessary Deaths in a Post-Pandemic NHS, Hunt said tackling the “chronic failure of workforce planning” was the most important task in relieving pressure on frontline services.
  • Jeremy Hunt has been accused of ignoring serious NHS staff shortages for years and driving medics out of the profession while health secretary after he intervened this weekend to warn of a workforce crisis.
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New study links support for Brett Kavanaugh to the endorsement of hegemonic masculinity

By Eric W. Dolan
  • “In collaboration with my advisor, Dr. Theresa Vescio, we found that the endorsement of hegemonic masculinity, or the belief that men should be high in power/status, should be tough, and should be nothing like women, was related to support for Donald Trump in both the 2016 and 2020 U.S. Presidential elections.”
  • Schermerhorn and his colleagues conducted three studies to examine whether the endorsement of hegemonic masculinity predicted more positive evaluations of Kavanaugh and more negative evaluations of the women who had accused him of sexual misconduct.
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Taboo stops south Asian people in UK seeking help for dementia, says charity

By Andrew Gregory Health editor
  • Thousands of south Asian people living with dementia in the UK are being denied access to help and support because stigma and taboo prevent them from getting diagnosed, a charity has warned.
  • “But people in the south Asian community have told us the worrying reality is that stigma and taboo are often deterring families from getting support.
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Robot-assisted surgery can cut blood clot risk and speed recovery, study finds

By Andrew Gregory Health editor
  • Patients having major abdominal operations should be offered the option of robotic surgery, doctors and scientists have said, after a world-first clinical trial found the procedures dramatically speed up recovery times, reduce complications and cut the risk of blood clots.
  • In a first-of-its-kind three-year study, experts at University College London (UCL) and the University of Sheffield discovered that patients having robot-assisted bladder cancer surgery recovered faster and returned home sooner than patients who had open surgery.
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Military and medicine: 10 shared risk factors for eating disorder development

By Jillian Rigert, MD, DMD
  • The need for this article was apparent following the observation of shared risk factors for eating disorder development that I faced as both a member of the military and in medicine, surrounded by too many people suffering in silence under the oppression of weight biases, outdated BMI guidelines, and the strive for perfection.
  • However, military and medical culture continue to be high-risk places for individuals to develop eating disorders and suffer in silence.
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Going green: the best plant-based alternatives

By Anna Berrill

If you want to start swapping out animal products for something healthier and more ethical – but equally as nutritious – here are the best substitutes

Embracing a diet of plant-based foods and fewer animal products is “healthy, sustainable, and good for both people and planet”, says the EAT-Lancet Commission on Food, Planet, Health. But while meat is known as an important source of nutrients, such as protein, iron and B12, is it possible to get the equivalent value from plant-based alternatives?

“Yes, but it depends how you do it,” says Priya Tew, director of Dietitian UK. Relying on ultra-processed ready meals or plant-based “meatballs”, say, is not going to be nutritionally superior to meat. In fact, adds Tew, “that can be worse”. Instead, adopt a variety of plant-based sources – fruit, vegetables, legumes, soya, wholegrains, pulses, nuts, seeds – and cook as much as you can from scratch, which, of course, requires some planning. Here’s a start: easy ways to swap animal protein for plant-based alternatives.

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Bill Gates: ‘Vaccines are a miracle. It’s mind-blowing somebody could say the opposite’

By Tim Lewis
  • I think it’s very important that we speak up, so that global health, things like the Global Fund [to Fight Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria] that’s saved millions of lives, or Gav, that’s saved millions of lives, or whatever the pandemic-preparedness initiative [that is introduced], that we keep those in mind and not move on.
  • The World Health Organization needs to be funded by the rich governments.
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Vortex review – Gaspar Noé’s punishing portrait of dementia

By Wendy Ide

The director abandons his showy style in this brutally matter-of-fact tale of a couple at the end of their lives in a Paris apartment

Never a director known for his gentle handling of an audience, Gaspar Noé applies the cinematic thumbscrews with his latest picture, in some ways his most punishing film to date. It’s also a world away, stylistically, from the bold, synapse-sizzling aesthetic of films such as Enter the Void and Climax.

A painfully bleak portrait of an elderly couple at the end of their lives, Vortex is brutally matter-of-fact about the indignities of old age. The film’s one concession to Noé’s normally showy directing style is a split-screen device, used to convey the disengagement and disorientation of dementia – the wife (Françoise Lebrun) struggles to recognise her husband and anxiously prowls their labyrinthine Parisian apartment, hoping to find an anchor of familiarity. The husband (neither character is named) is a petulant intellectual, played by the writer-director Dario Argento. He views his wife’s deterioration as an inconvenience.

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Sharing Mayo Clinic: A heart patient’s fall picks up something big

By Ron Petrovich
  • Mitch is dedicated to helping others with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, especially contributing to data to learn more about the disease, so when Dr. Geske asked if he'd be interested in the study he said yes.
  • About a year later and back to the Wisconsin woods — the day after his fall — Mitch sent a message to Dr. Geske asking if the device indicated any unusual heart activity that night.
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Tory backlash grows over delay to junk food TV ad ban

By Michael Savage Policy Editor
  • Boris Johnson is already facing a growing backlash within his party over his decision to shelve a plan to ban “buy-one-get-one-free” supermarket deals and pre-watershed TV advertising for junk food.
  • Another former health minister warned the decision could “blow a hole” in the government’s obesity strategy, which Johnson championed after his own weight put him at risk when he became ill with Covid-19.
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In her gracious acceptance of death, Deborah James has given us lessons in how to live | Nicci Gerrard

By Nicci Gerrard
  • The brilliant, intimate, funny, flaying books and articles and programmes and podcasts by people who are dying have immense value, for they allow us to think of our own endings, and how we want to die says something about how we want to live.
  • Since her diagnosis of terminal bowel cancer, she has become famous and beloved as a tireless campaigner, co-host of the award-winning podcast of You, Me and the Big C, author of a book about cancer and a humane and life-affirming contributor to the conversation around how we face death.
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Go with your gut: scientist Tim Spector on why food is not just fuel

By Linda Geddes

The scientist has spent years studying how gut health relates not just to nutrition, but to all aspects of our everyday wellbeing. He explains why it really is what’s inside that counts

Tim Spector’s kitchen fridge is swarming with life: kefir grains, sourdough mother, homemade kimchi and kombucha. Then there’s the vegetables: as varied and colourful as possible.

While many diets eschew certain food groups, Spector’s focuses on incorporating as much variety as possible: at least 30 different plants a week – including nuts, seeds, pulses, whole grains, fruits and vegetables – on top of starchy staples such as potatoes or rice. The reason? He believes that diversity is crucial to warding off infections, combating age-related diseases and maintaining a healthy weight.

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The Far Side of the Moon by Clive Stafford Smith review – a death row lawyer’s soul-searching memoir

By Tim Adams
  • Dick Stafford Smith, whose death in 2007 first prompted this book, was in some ways the blueprint for all of the prisoners lost in the American justice system, for whom his son petitioned mercy: a man burdened with a temperamental makeup entirely unsuited to the circumstances of his adult life.
  • The second is Larry Lonchar, an inmate in Georgia State Prison facing a capital sentence, one of the many men for whom Stafford Smith has acted as advocate and sometime saviour in the past 40 years.
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US Covid deaths hit 1m, a death toll higher than any other country

By Jessica Glenza
  • More than one million people have died in the Covid-19 pandemic in the US, according to Johns Hopkins, far and away the most deaths of any country.
  • While the sheer number of deaths from the coronavirus sets the US apart, the country’s large population of 332.5 million people does not explain the staggering mortality rate, which is among the highest in the world.
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My partner’s toxic family is ruining our wedding plans | Ask Philippa

By Philippa Perry

Try to understand them rather than judging them – and do this so that you become unstuck, which is what you want after all

The dilemma My boyfriend proposed to me a couple years ago. I was delighted. Sadly, his family were less than impressed. Although I have a PhD, I’m American and his British family look down on me because I’m not British, and I didn’t attend Oxbridge. It’s ironic: none of them have anything near a PhD.

I told my mother about this and she subsequently refused to communicate with my partner’s mother. The plans trudged on and both mothers became unbearable.

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Heightened dream recall ability linked to increased creativity and functional brain connectivity

By Eric W. Dolan
  • People who can frequently recall their dreams tend to be more creative and exhibit increased functional connectivity in a key brain network, according to new research published in the journal Nature and Science of Sleep .
  • Vallat and his colleagues also observed increased functional connectivity within the default mode network in high dream recallers compared to low dream recallers.
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Six Lithium Dose Predictors for Patients With Bipolar Disorder

By Neuroscience News
  • Six predictors could help determine the amount of lithium needed to treat patients with bipolar disorder, according to a large study led by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden.
  • “Our model based on these predictors explained around 50–60% of the variance in lithium clearance, which is better than previous models and could be used to inform treatment decision,” says first author Vincent Millischer, a postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, and resident in psychiatry at the Medical University of Vienna.
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Common Fungicide Detected in Pregnant Women and Children

By Neuroscience News
  • For the first time, UNC-Chapel Hill researchers have measured the concentration of a biomarker of the commonly used fungicide azoxystrobin (AZ) in the urine of pregnant women and children ranging from 40–84 months of age.
  • Zylka’s lab conducted experiments, led by first author Wenxin Hu, Ph.D., a UNC-Chapel Hill postdoctoral researcher, to measure the concentration of a biomarker of AZ exposure (AZ-acid) in the urine of pregnant women and in a separate group of children ranging from 40 to 84 months old.
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Combination of ‘Feelings’ and Measurements Suggest Alzheimer’s in the Early Stage

By Neuroscience News
  • Summary: A combination of patient-reported subjective cognitive impairment and measurable clinical symptoms, such as amyloid-beta accumulation in the cerebrospinal fluid, may help in the early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease.
  • “When you add up all the findings, including the data from those subjects who already had measurable cognitive deficits at baseline, we see the combination of SCD and amyloid-positive status as a strong indicator of early-stage Alzheimer’s disease,” Jessen says.
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William Brewer: ‘The Red Arrow isn’t a drug book, but…’

By Anthony Cummins
  • I didn’t even know “ Frecciarossa ” [Italy’s high-speed train service] meant “red arrow”; all the stuff about physics and the arrow of time in the book was a happy accident.
  • A lot of the time when people try to write about that, they write incoherent, scrambly text, like something from the era of the beats, but psychedelic experience can actually be very lucid: it isn’t a wild and crazy light show so much as an elegant revelation of how things are connected.
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For triglycerides, “normal” may not be “optimal”

By Peter Attia
  • (Two centuries ago, a normal life expectancy was around 30-40 years, but I doubt anyone would call that normal or optimal today.) This semantic problem was highlighted in a 2020 study investigating the relationship between serum triglycerides (TG) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk : is “normal” really “optimal?”
  • As a primary variable of interest, the investigators used average serum TGs over time, as averaging TGs minimizes the “noise” in the measurements and decreases the impact of outliers, and this value was found to be more highly correlated with CV events than either baseline TGs or maximum prior TGs. A distribution of TG levels in male and female cohorts is shown in Figure 1 below.
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We’ve Never Been Good at Feeding Babies

By Amanda Mull
  • The loss of this particular plant’s manufacturing capacity would have caused supply issues no matter when it happened, but it came at a very delicate moment: Nutritional formula is among the many consumer products that have been periodically scarce throughout the pandemic, leaving the market ill-equipped to deal with the sudden, extended closure of one of the country’s biggest formula plants—and, in the case of some specialty formulas, one of the country’s only plants.
  • In an acute sense, this chaos was caused by the February shutdown of a large Abbott Nutrition manufacturing plant in Michigan and an associated product recall, following the deaths of at least two infants, which the FDA believes were connected to tainted Similac formula.
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Targeted support program improved blood pressure among Black and Hispanic adults in Bronx

  • RESTON, Va., May 14, 2022 — A nurse-led blood pressure program that included patient education and support for management of high blood pressure resulted in participants taking their blood pressure medication regularly and having fewer episodes of uncontrolled high blood pressure, according to preliminary research to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2022 .
  • “Two years ago, we initiated a treat-to-target program for people with uncontrolled high blood pressure to receive care at a specialized clinic within our outpatient center, and we’ve found this approach to be successful in helping participants better manage their blood pressure .”
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Coffee bad, red wine good? Top food myths busted

By Rebecca Seal

We’re being bombarded with conflicting advice on what we should and shouldn’t put into our bodies. Finally, here are the definitive answers, according to the experts

Modern nutritional science is only a hundred years old, so it’s no surprise that we’re constantly bamboozled by new and competing information about what to put into our bodies – or that we sometimes cling to reassuringly straightforward food myths which may no longer be true. In a world where official dietary advice seems to change all the time, and online opinions are loud and often baseless, we ask eight food and drink experts to cut through the noise and tell it like it is.

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Prediabetes linked to higher heart attack risk in young adults

  • RESTON, Va., May 14, 2022 — Young adults with higher than normal blood sugar levels that signal prediabetes were more likely to be hospitalized for heart attack compared to their peers with normal blood sugar levels, according to in preliminary research to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2022 .
  • Young adults (ages 18 to 44 years) diagnosed with prediabetes were more likely to be hospitalized for heart attack than those without prediabetes, according to a review of U.S. health records in 2018.
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Flight delayed? Blame a spaceship.

By Rebecca Heilweil
  • In order to break through the atmosphere and reach outer space, rockets must first travel through airspace that’s monitored by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), which oversees air traffic control centers and flight navigation throughout the country.
  • But thanks to the rise of the commercial space industry, there’s now a surprising new source of air travel disruption: rocket launches.
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Carrick Flynn may be 2022’s unlikeliest candidate. Here’s why he’s running.

By Miranda Dixon-Luinenburg
  • More broadly, I think economic growth, the progress studies approach — making sure that we are investing in good research, that we’re getting good jobs back, that we’re not having laws and regulations that are making people artificially poor or resulting in homelessness —these things really matter a lot.
  • I’m curious how you talk about issues like pandemic preparedness, or the long-term future with voters.
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Science Saturday: Using metal detectors to ward off wayward specimens

By Tracy Will
  • The Histology Laboratory in Mayo Clinic’s Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology processes more than 350,000 paraffin-embedded blocks every year as lab staff prepare tissue slides for pathologists to evaluate.
  • One patient block gone is one too many, especially if we've taken the only specimen they have," says Heather Nowacki, the Histology Lab's pathology accessioning supervisor.
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Journalists Recap the Latest on the Supreme Court Leak, Mental Health Care, and Fentanyl Testing Strips

KHN chief Washington correspondentJulie Rovner discussed the leaked Supreme Court draft opinion on abortion rights on Deep State Radio on May 5 and again on WFAE’s “Charlotte Talks with Mike Collins” on May 9. Click here to hear Rovner on Deep State RadioClick here to hear Rovner on WFAERead Rovner’s “Historic ‘Breach’ Puts Abortion Rights Supporters and Opponents on Alert for Upcoming Earthquake”KHN correspondent Aneri Pattani discussed how our mental and physical health is connected on WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio’s “Where We Live” on May 6. Click here to hear Pattani on WNPR/Connecticut Public RadioKHN interim Southern bureau editor […]Read more >Similar articles >

The secret to saving your relationship: eight lessons from a couples therapist

By Zoe Williams

Over three decades, Susanna Abse has worked with every kind of couple. She shares what she’s learned on how to stay the distance – and why fighting is good

Susanna Abse is the marriage counsellor’s marriage counsellor – 30 years in practice giving her peerless insights into the challenges couples face without making any dent in her curiosity and originality. This serene, witty 65-year-old is exacting but non-judgmental; I imagine you’d feel able to say absolutely anything in front of her, unless it was bullshit. You would trust her with your marriage, but you’d want to take your A-game.

Abse can’t begin to estimate how many couples she’s seen since her first in 1986, but puts it at tens of thousands of hours. She has worked with every kind of couple, from the ones who “bang their heads together and shout and stand up and walk out” (she calls these “doll’s house” couples in her book – people who break things without any sense of consequence), to the ones who think there’s never been anything wrong, and can’t understand why they’ve suddenly got issues.

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UN official on Roe v Wade: reversal would ‘give legitimacy to growing anti-women’s rights’

By Jessica Glenza
  • T he United Nations special rapporteur on the right to health, one of the international body’s most important human rights advocates, has urged the US supreme court not to end federal protections for abortion rights in America.
  • In both her brief and interview with the Guardian, she said a reversal of Roe v Wade would, “legitimize the use of morality and theological reasoning” to take away human rights, empower anti-rights activists globally, criminalize the practice of medicine, undermine the doctor-patient relationship and expose healthcare providers and patients to heightened abuse and violence .
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For these Trojans, commencement is a family affair

By USC News
  • "I made them go here," Nyberg said before the ceremony in which his son, Alex, would be receiving a bachelor's degree from USC Marshall School of Business .
  • About 30 minutes before the start of commencement on Friday, soon-to-be USC School of Dramatic Arts graduate Nico Fife couldn't find his family for a planned pre-ceremony huddle.
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Increased Mutations in Children Can Be Traced Back to Mistakes in Father’s Sperm

By Neuroscience News
  • Some rare cases of higher genetic mutation rates in children, known as hypermutation, could be linked to the father receiving certain chemotherapy treatments, new research has found.
  • In new research, from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and collaborators, scientists used genetic data and family health histories from existing databases to identify children that had unusually high mutation rates, between two and seven times higher than average, to investigate where these might have originated from.
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A specific way to improve our health care delivery system

By Lea Lefkowitz
  • I ended up learning a lot about medicine in the United States and our health care financing system, from insurance to federal policy and beyond, that I can now apply to my own life and my future patients’ lives.
  • One assignment in this course that stood out was an essay in which we discussed transparency in health care, which later ended up tying into another essay asking us to apply anything we had learned in the course to our own lives.
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Links Connecting Stress, Depression and Heart Disease Risk Found

By Neuroscience News
  • Results from a new mouse model may aid in understanding how depression and prolonged and severe stress increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Vascular Discovery: From Genes to Medicine Scientific Sessions 2022.
  • The risk of developing cardiovascular disease increases in proportion to depression severity,” said lead study author Özlem Tufanli Kireccibasi, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Edward A.
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U.S. ‘Vulnerable’ to COVID Without New Shots, White House Says

  • The U.S. will become increasingly vulnerable to the coronavirus in the fall and winter this year if Congress doesn’t approve new funding for more vaccines and treatments, Ashish Jha, MD, the White House COVID-19 response coordinator, said Thursday.
  • Jha noted that the next generation of vaccines, which would likely focus on the Omicron variant, “are going to provide a much, much higher degree of protection against the virus that we will encounter in the fall and winter.”
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Parents nationwide struggle with a critical baby formula shortage

By Ali Rogin
A baby formula shortage has become a major problem for parents around the U.S., one without quick solutions. About 40 percent of formula is out of stock nationwide due to supply chain disruptions, inflation and a recall by one of the biggest producers. Meanwhile, the White House announced steps to address the shortage. Brian Dittmeier, of the National WIC Association, joins Ali Rogin to discuss. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Prince William presents damehood to Deborah James as cancer fundraiser raises £5m

By Euan O'Byrne Mulligan
  • James, 40, known online as Bowelbabe after campaigning to raise awareness of bowel cancer, launched the JustGiving page on Monday after revealing she was receiving end-of-life care for the condition.
  • The podcast host Deborah James said she is “completely lost for words” after her Cancer Research fundraising initiative passed the £5m mark in just five days.
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How Sleep Helps to Process Emotions

By Neuroscience News
  • This decoupling is important because the strong activity of the dendrites allows the encoding of both danger and safety emotions, while the inhibitions of the soma completely block the output of the circuit during REM sleep.
  • Researchers at the Department of Neurology of the University of Bern and University Hospital Bern identified how the brain triages emotions during dream sleep to consolidate the storage of positive emotions while dampening the consolidation of negative ones.
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Video Games Can Boost Children’s Intelligence

By Neuroscience News
  • They found that the children who spent an above-average time playing video games increased their intelligence more than the average, while TV watching or social media had neither a positive nor a negative effect.
  • Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have studied how the screen habits of U.S. children correlate with how their cognitive abilities develop over time.
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Bumpy ride: rail trail projects making ‘itty-bitty’ progress in rural NSW

By Clare McCabe

Cycling and heritage trails could boost tourism and local jobs, but they face planning and funding roadblocks

After the final train departed the Crookwell railway station for Goulburn in 1985, a stretch of track in the New South Wales southern tablelands was all but abandoned.

It’s a similar story for long-disused country rail networks across the state. But there’s a push to transform these isolated and often scenic corridors into rail trails and heritage projects.

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A nurse was just sentenced to 3 years of probation for a lethal medical error

By Keren Landman
  • RaDonda Vaught, whose criminal prosecution for a fatal medical error made her case a flashpoint in national conversations about nursing shortages and patient safety, was sentenced on Friday to three years of probation in a Nashville criminal court.
  • One of the biggest concerns among patient safety experts is that severe punishment for medical errors — as in Vaught’s case — will lead to reduced error reporting by other nurses due to fear of being fired, or fear of prosecution.
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No Prison Time for Tennessee Nurse Convicted of Fatal Drug Error

By Brett Kelman
  • RaDonda Vaught, a former Tennessee nurse convicted of two felonies for a fatal drug error, whose trial became a rallying cry for nurses fearful of the criminalization of medical mistakes, will not be required to spend any time in prison.
  • She was “a very forgiving person” who would not want Vaught to serve any prison time, he said, but his widower father wanted Murphey to receive “the maximum sentence.”
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COVID-19 Scan for May 13, 2022

By Jim Wappes
  • Persistent SARS-CoV-2 shedding in hospitalized COVID-19 patients is tied to a higher risk of in-hospital delirium and death by 6 months, according to a study published this week in GeroScience .
  • Boston Children's researchers have found evidence that the COVID-19 Omicron variant is more likely to cause croup in children that previous SARS-CoV-2 iterations, according to a study today in Pediatrics .
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Hispanic people with chest pain wait in ER on average 28 minutes longer than other people

  • RESTON, Va., May 13, 2022 — Hispanic people who went to the emergency room (ER) reporting chest pain waited longer than non-Hispanic people to be treated, admitted to the hospital or discharged from the ER, according to preliminary research to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2022 .
  • According to the American Heart Association, cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death across almost all ethnic groups in the U.S., including Hispanic people who represent the largest and fastest growing ethnic population in the U.S., and they have significant diversity in race, national origin and immigration status.
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Hospitals stayed financially viable in pandemic—some even did better

By Jim Wappes
  • Government, rural, and smaller hospitals had higher average profit margins in 2020 than in 2019 (7.2% vs 3.7%, 7.5% vs 1.9%, and 6.7% vs 3.5%, respectively), and the results remained consistent when assessing hospitals with fiscal years starting in July.
  • A study of 2,163 US hospitals shows that, despite substantially reduced operating margins in 2020, their overall profit margins remained similar to those before the COVID-19 pandemic, and government, rural, and smaller hospitals performed even better than in previous years.
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Four women recognized through Go Red for Women’s premier community impact program

  • Four women have reached a prestigious volunteer milestone with the American Heart Association, the world’s leading nonprofit organization devoted to a world of healthier lives for all, for their efforts to advance women’s heart health and fund scientific research.
  • Starting in February, participants earned points over nine weeks through peer-to-peer fundraising and community impact activities like hosting exercise classes, inviting people to join the American Heart Association’s grassroots advocacy network, creating awareness events and more.
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Some UK public swimming pools forced to close over national chlorine shortage

By Julia Kollewe

Factors from Brexit to lower production in China to war in Ukraine fuel limited supplies of pool chemicals

A shortage of chlorine is forcing some public swimming pools to close, with operators blaming factors ranging from a production fall in China to Brexit and the war in Ukraine.

Saxon Pool in Biggleswade, Bedfordshire, has been closed to general swimmers since 6 May, with the operator and Central Bedfordshire council cancelling almost all sessions, apart from swimming lessons and a swimathon event.

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Three Questions About the Mysterious Hepatitis in Kids

By Sarah Zhang
  • “I don’t think it’s directly related to the virus itself,” says Buchfellner, but perhaps a COVID infection could have predisposed a kid to liver failure once something else—say, an adenovirus infection—came along.
  • Alarmed, the hospital’s doctors alerted local health authorities and the CDC, whose investigation ultimately found nine such cases of unusual hepatitis in kids in Alabama.
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Links connecting stress, depression and heart disease risk found in mouse model

  • SEATTLE, May 13, 2022 — Results from a new mouse model may aid in understanding how depression and prolonged and severe stress increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Vascular Discovery: From Genes to Medicine Scientific Sessions 2022 .
  • Results from a new study conducted on mice may aid in understanding how depression and prolonged and severe stress increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.
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How to cover opioid lawsuits and settlement money

By Bara Vaida
  • Weizman and Park said their biggest concerns were that most of the settlement money wouldn’t go to trying to address the opioid epidemic, but instead would end up in general state and local government coffers to be used for other things like roads and education.
  • Billions of dollars are soon to be rolling out in the states to settle thousands of lawsuits filed against opioid manufacturers, distributors and retailers.
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UK delays ban on supermarket junk food deals and pre-watershed ads

By Mark Sweney
  • The government is to delay a ban on “buy one get one free” deals on junk food and a pre-9pm watershed for TV advertising, as Boris Johnson puts the cost of living crisis before a promise to tackle the UK’s growing obesity crisis.
  • The government is also delaying the implementation of a ban on TV adverts for foods high in fat, salt and sugar before 9pm, which was due to come into force from January.
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Enzyme in babies’ blood linked to risk of sudden infant death syndrome

By Hannah Devlin Science correspondent
  • Although the test is not accurate enough to be used in newborn screening, it hints that abnormally low levels of a chemical linked to the brain’s arousal system could be involved in causing these babies to die suddenly in their sleep.
  • The study is the first to identify a biochemical marker in the blood that is linked to the risk of Sids, sometimes called cot death, when an apparently healthy infant dies during their sleep.
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The tabula sapiens consortium – mapping cell types in the human body

By mdbownds@wisc.edu (Deric Bownds)
It is hard to keep up with the mind boggling advances that pop up in almost every issue of Science Magazine. In a perspective article Liu and Zhang describe the findings of the “Tabula Sapiens Consortium” that has now provided a molecular reference atlas for more than 400 cell types of the human body by measuring the messenger RNA molecules in each of nearly 500,000 cells from 24 tissues and organs. Multiple laboratories used single-cell transcriptomics to measure the messenger RNA molecules in each of nearly 500,000 cells from 24 tissues and organs Here is a single clip summary clip from Liu and Zhang:
the Tabula Sapiens Consortium discovered that endothelial cells from lung, heart, uterus, liver, pancreas, fat, and muscle exhibit the most distinct transcriptional signatures, suggesting highly specialized functions, whereas endothelial cells from the thymus, vasculature, prostate, and eye resemble one another. The pan-tissue approach led to the discovery of SLC14A1 (solute carrier family 14 member 1) as a marker for heart endothelial cells, likely reflecting specialized metabolism in cardiac blood vessels. Eraslan et al. also found rare cell types, such as neuroendocrine cells in the prostate and enteric neurons in the esophagus. Additionally, the corroborative use of both high-throughput 10X and full-length SMART-seq2 single-cell transcriptome data allowed the quantification of splicing isoform usage at the single-cell level, thereby revealing differential exon usage patterns for genes, including MYL6 (myosin light chain 6) and CD47, in different cell-type compartments.
[…]Read more >Similar articles >
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‘Phage therapy’ successes boost fight against drug-resistant infections

By Hannah Devlin Science correspondent
  • One of the patients, Jarrod Johnson, a 26-year-old man with cystic fibrosis, was approaching death after suffering a chronic lung infection that resisted treatment by antibiotics for six years.
  • “These two reports really provide substantial encouragement for phage treatments for patients where antibiotics not only fail to control the infections, but also contribute substantial toxicity,” said Prof Graham Hatfull, whose team at the University of Pittsburgh developed the therapies.
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The Best Stove for Your Health and the Environment

By Madison Dapcevich
  • A startling study published in January by Stanford University found that natural gas stoves—which more than a third of American homes use—may emit concerning levels of indoor air pollution, and could play a larger role in driving climate change than previously believed.
  • While the Stanford study only looked at a small number of homes, the team believes their state-level findings can be applied to the rest of the country, with little regional variation, suggesting that the impact of natural gas appliances is likely underestimated.
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Need help managing diabetes? These students made an app for that

By Karen Gail Feldscher
  • The two Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health students—both pursuing a master of science in health data science —co-founded a tech startup called basys.ai in order to create an easy-to-use app that diabetes patients can use to keep track of their blood glucose level, activities, diet, and other factors.
  • Through basys.ai, Nigam and Sun hope to help diabetic patients like Nigam’s father have more autonomy in managing their disease.
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The latest on Slow Cooked, my forthcoming memoir

By Marion
University of California Press has just issued its fall catalog and Slow Cooked is on pages 12 and 13. It includes an interview: Here’s a description of the book. Its publication date is October 4, but it can be preordered at any of these sites. Amazon Barnes & Noble Bookshop IndieBound Powell’s UC Press The post The latest on Slow Cooked, my forthcoming memoir appeared first on Food Politics by Marion Nestle. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Alone at the hands of healthcare: hospital visitor policies during the COVID-19 pandemic

By Clarice
  • In our article, we find a patient-centered and thoughtful approach to hospital visitor policies is likely to benefit the stakeholders while minimizing harms.
  • In April 2022, we published “The effect of hospital visitor policies on patients, their visitors, and healthcare providers during the COVID-19 pandemic: a systematic review” in The American Journal of Medicine, which evaluated the evidence surrounding hospital visitor policies during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Will Fall’s Omicron Vaccines Come Too Late?

By Katherine J. Wu
  • And as a booster, especially, an Omicron shot could have clear perks, shoring up the defenses laid down by previous doses while also, ideally, pushing a new batch of immune cells to wise up to the variant’s unique and never-before-seen quirks, says Marion Pepper, an immunologist at the University of Washington.
  • In the recent advisory meeting, Marks emphasized that any vaccine updates would be expected to be comprehensive, replacing old formulations as both boosters and primary-series doses; after the changeover, people who haven’t gotten their first doses—who number in the tens of millions in the U.S. alone, and would include future generations of kids—might not be able to nab an original-recipe shot.
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Meta-analysis of 15 studies on depression suggests significant mental health benefits from being physically active

By Emily Manis
  • A new study published in JAMA Psychiatry suggests that exercise is related to lower levels of depression, even for people who are doing less physical activity than is recommended by public health professionals.
  • Data was extracted from the studies, including volume of physical activity, depression cases, participant number, and follow-up.
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From stigma to spotlight: Deborah James puts focus on bowel cancer

By Geneva Abdul
  • James, who was diagnosed with stage 4 bowel cancer in 2016, said on Monday that she was under hospice at home care and “spending my time surrounded by my family”.
  • “Over the last five years, I’ve campaigned, I’ve spoken about awareness, I’ve shared my story, my reason for laughs, for giggles, for showing that you can live with cancer,” James told the BBC .
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‘Groundbreaking’: NHS advised to offer women tablet for fibroids

By Andrew Gregory Health editor
  • Taken once a day as a single tablet, comprising 40mg relugolix, 1mg estradiol and 0.5mg norethisterone acetate, the treatment is another option for women with moderate to severe symptoms, Nice said.
  • Relugolix with estradiol and norethisterone acetate offers an effective alternative to surgery and injectable gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists, which also work to reduce the production of oestrogen and progesterone in the ovaries.
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