Jul 26, 2021

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Positive covid test causes snag in ex-senator Baker’s trial

By Dale Ellis
  • Assistant U.S. Attorney Julie Peters said during opening statements Monday morning that the government would prove Baker funneled bribes to Maggio to reduce a $5 million wrongful death award to $1 million in 2013 when Maggio was running for a seat on the Arkansas Court of Appeals.
  • His action occurred July 10, the day after 10 $3,000 checks written by the nursing home’s owner, Michael Morton, arrived at the home of Baker, a friend and political ally of Maggio.
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Kim Janey launches three months of free bus rides between Roxbury, Mattapan

By Meghan Ottolini
  • Commuters will be able to ride the MBTA Route 28 bus between Roxbury and Mattapan for free this fall, thanks to a new pilot program launched by Acting Mayor Kim Janey – and it could just mark the beginning of fare-free buses in Boston.
  • The three-month program will kick off August 29th and last through November 30th, serving one of the busiest MBTA bus lines in the Hub. The 28 bus carried nearly 13,000 riders up and down Blue Hill Avenue on an average weekday pre-pandemic.
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‘We’re F—ed’: Dems Fear Turnout Catastrophe From GOP Voting Laws

  • Jaime Harrison, chair of the Democratic National Committee, said that in addition to portions of laws seemingly designed to curb turnout, “what is even more nefarious is what happens once people, if they can get through all the hurdles that they’ve set up, what happens to their vote once it has been cast?”
  • Aneesa McMillan, Priorities USA’s deputy executive director, who runs the group’s voting rights program, said the “most ridiculous thing we’ve had to sue over” was a Michigan law that prevents hiring people to transport voters to the polls.
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Ex-NXIVM president Salzman: I didn’t protect daughter from ‘likely’ psychopath Raniere

By Robert Gavin

In a letter to a federal judge seeking leniency for her daughter, former NXIVM president Nancy Salzman described Keith Raniere as a “sexual predator,” “narcissist” and “likely a psychopath” whom she failed to shield from her vulnerable child.

Nancy Salzman, who co-founded the cult-like personal growth organization in Colonie with Raniere in 1998, wrote the letter to Senior U.S. District Judge Nicholas Garaufis, who will sentence Lauren Salzman on Wednesday for her guilty pleas to racketeering and racketeering conspiracy.

“Of all the regrettable things I have done with Keith and NXIVM, this by far is the one that gives me the greatest personal sadness,” Nancy Salzman told the judge in a letter filed in a sentencing recommendation from her daughter’s lawyers. “I am responsible fo Lauren being before you, having endured arrest, prosecution and successful cooperation and now facing her own judgement.”

[…]Read more >Similar articles >
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In the real world, Biden is tough on Cuba. In the right-wing world, he’s pro-Communist.

By Max Boot
  • He promised during the campaign to lift some sanctions on Cuba, as President Barack Obama did, not because he is sympathetic to its government but because the U.S. embargo has added to the suffering of the Cuban people without dislodging the regime.
  • “Biden sanctioning an already sanctioned regime official in #Cuba is the kind of symbolic but meaningless measure we will continue to see as long as @potus is being advised by people who were drinking mojitos in Havana in 2015 to celebrate the Obama policy,” Rubio complained .
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Northam proposes spending $500 million in federal relief money for school air quality projects

By Gregory S. Schneider
  • Gov. Ralph Northam on Monday proposed spending $500 million in federal coronavirus relief money to improve ventilation and air quality in public schools around the state.
  • Speaking in the city of Hopewell, which was kicking off a new year-round school initiative, Northam called for setting aside $250 million for the projects from funds sent to the state government under the federal American Rescue Plan Act. School systems would have to match that funding from ARPA or other federal relief money sent directly to localities.
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Free back-to-school supplies for Tucson teachers

  • The event, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., is part of Four Peaks Brewing Co.’s 11th annual Four Peaks For Teachers campaign, which is raising funds to distribute school supply kits to 10,000 teachers in Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas and Utah.
  • Registration is open for the first session, which will be offered at the Catalina, Drexel Heights, Ellie Towne Flowing Wells, Littletown and Arivaca community centers, from school dismissal to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday.
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Merrick Garland, non-brawler for democracy

By Will Bunch
  • Another irony is that before President Joe Biden tapped Garland as the nation's top prosecutor, his name possessed a remarkable symbolism for the so-called anti-Trump "Resistance" that was radicalized to fight the authoritarianism of the 45th president — after GOP Sen. Mitch McConnell shredded off a piece of the Constitution to block Barack Obama from naming Garland to the Supreme Court in 2016.
  • Attorney General Merrick Garland might be the ultimate example of the American Dream-era baby boomer at the core of today's Democratic Party — especially its elite leadership cadre.
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US monitoring over 200 people for potential monkeypox exposure

By Maya Yang
  • The CDC said it was working with airline, state and local health authorities in 27 states to identify and assess individuals who may have been in contact with the person on flights from Lagos to Atlanta and Atlanta to Dallas on 9 July.
  • US health officials are monitoring more than 200 people for potential exposure to monkeypox, after an individual who contracted the disease in Nigeria returned to Texas in July.
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Earth’s climate is warming so quickly it’s causing record-shattering heat waves, study finds

By Andrew Freedman
  • The recent deadly heat wave in the Pacific Northwest, during which all-time temperature records were shattered by several degrees, is a prologue to what is coming across much of the U.S., Europe and Asia, a new study finds.
  • They focused on the occurrence of week-long, record-shattering heat waves, such as the one that recently occurred in the Pacific Northwest and Canada, and examined how these probabilities would change depending on the rate and amount of greenhouse gas emissions .
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Finding the Heart and Soul of The Queen’s Gambit

By David Canfield
  • Ingram plays Jolene as a child in the earliest episodes, meeting and bonding with a young Beth ( Isla Johnston, later Anya Taylor-Joy ) at an orphanage, and as an adult in the finale, surprising a spiraling Beth at her Lexington, Kentucky, home.
  • We explored how it came to be with Ingram, as well as Meizler and costume designer Gabriele Binder —both Emmy-nominated for their work on the episode.
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City Council to hear how Longmont can spend $12.97 million in federal COVID-19 recovery funds

By John Fryar
  • Longmont’s City Council is to get a Tuesday night staff presentation about ways the city could spend the $12.97 million in federal funds Longmont is getting to help the community recover from economic and health effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • “The way we spend the $12.97 million ARPA local recovery fund will play a key role in our community’s recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic,” staff wrote councilmembers, but Tuesday night’s briefing isn’t expected to include staff recommendations for specific local programs or projects that might be eligible beneficiaries of the federal money.
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Enough already. It’s time for vaccine entry passes.

By Jennifer Rubin
  • Moreover, there is no reason the White House cannot strongly encourage states, localities and private entities to start requiring proof of vaccination.
  • 15, and telling the rest of the French population they will be denied access to most indoor public venues if unvaccinated or without a negative test by Aug. 1, has prompted other countries including Italy to follow suit, even as it has stirred pockets of deep resistance,” the New York Times reports .
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Senior Living: Heart failure and aging, a guide to managing the condition

By Contributing Writer
  • One challenge that older adults face is that the assessment, diagnosis and management of heart failure in the elderly is often complicated by other age-related diseases and medical conditions that can also affect the heart.
  • Heart failure disproportionately affects older adults and is the leading cause of morbidity, hospitalization and mortality in those at least 65 years of age, according to the National Institutes of Health .
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‘I was looking at a nightmare:’ Spanish-speakers hard hit by COVID relied on food banks instead of government assistance

By Leonardo Castañeda, Jesse Bedayn
  • Spanish-speaking Latinos were among the hardest hit during the COVID-19 pandemic, reporting some of the highest levels of food insecurity driven by a wave of job losses, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau.
  • But despite their higher food insecurity, Latinos who responded to the census bureau in Spanish and English were equally likely to receive food stamps — managed in California by CalFresh.
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How Trump Hijacked His Party’s Best Resources

By Jonathan Bernstein
  • Republican politicians are afraid of Trump because so many resources important to them are controlled by the national Republican Party network.
  • Trump’s only real weapon in this fight is that other Republican leaders realize he has no loyalty to the party at all, and so attempting to win back these resources risks having him take the party down with him.
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How Minnesota’s smallest state park came to be

By Marjorie Savage
  • The geological history of Franz Jevne State Park surfaces in a 2.1-billion-year-old outcrop of bedrock within the park and in the boulders that form the nearby rapids, known as Ginwaajiwanaang (Kay-Nah-Chi-Wah-Nung, The Place of the Long Rapids) in Ojibwe .
  • Stretching along the southern shoreline of the Rainy River in Koochiching County, the park represents the combination of natural resources and social history that built Minnesota’s far north.
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America’s Investing Boom Goes Far Beyond Reddit Bros

  • But plenty of people he knows in “Middle America,” as he put it, joined in on meme-stock trading (as well as mainstream investing) in order to challenge short-selling hedge funds like the ones that tried to bring down GameStop.
  • And in spite of the scrutiny that Robinhood received for hastily halting GameStop trading in order to ensure it had enough collateral to backstop trades, the whole cause célèbre birthed the mainstreaming of “ meme stocks ”: public companies that benefit from their market value surging, not mainly because of business fundamentals but because of their popularity among the masses, driven by social media.
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Major medical groups call for health care employers to mandate COVID-19 vaccines for workers

  • This is the logical fulfillment of the ethical commitment of all health care workers to put patients as well as residents of long-term care facilities first and take all steps necessary to ensure their health and well-being," they wrote in the joint statement issued Monday."Because of highly contagious variants, including the Delta variant, and significant numbers of unvaccinated people, COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths are once again rising throughout the United States.
  • As the number of COVID-19 cases surges in the United States, more than 50 health care groups — including the American Medical Association, the American College of Physicians, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Public Health Association — issued a joint statement calling for all health care and long-term care employers to mandate employees be vaccinated against COVID-19.
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Lady goose ‘breaks into’ clinic to help care for her man after surgery

By Noah Sheidlower
  • Zak Mertz, executive director of the center that is run by New England Wildlife Centers, told the Cape Cod Times that Arnold would continually stumble and fall over, so the team gave him an exam.
  • Staff at the Birdsey Cape Wildlife Center in Barnstable, Massachusetts on Cape Cod were shocked to see the mate of a Canadian goose they were treating for open fractures show up at their door, as captured in charming Newsflare video footage.
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Biden nominates U.S. attorneys for D.C., Maryland

By Ovetta Wiggins, Paul M. Duggan
  • Graves, 45, who specialized in public corruption as a federal prosecutor from 2007 to 2016, was nominated by President Biden to be the next U.S. attorney in the nation’s capital.
  • Barron, 47, a Democratic member of the Maryland General Assembly, was nominated by Biden to be U.S. attorney in Maryland, a state with a large federal government presence.
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Insurance brokers Aon and Willis Towers Watson end $34 billion merger amid DOJ suit

By Dan Primack
  • Driving the news: Insurance brokers Aon (NYSE: AON) and Willis Towers Watson (Nasdaq: WLTW) this morning terminated their $34 billion merger agreement, just five weeks after the U.S. Department of Justice sued to block the deal.
  • European antitrust regulators reportedly are launching a full investigation into Facebook's proposed $1 billion purchase of enterprise customer service company Kustomer, which was first announced last November.
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Jobless benefits update: Abuse, harassment and ‘Weenie Bite’ ruminations

By Clark Kauffman
  • An administrative law judge denied Lantz’s request for unemployment benefits, finding that she had violated Mercy’s code of conduct policy by making “inappropriate comments about race and economic status after having been warned.”
  • Hundreds of Iowans left jobless amid allegations of harassment, ethics violations and other forms of misconduct have had their claims for unemployment benefits decided by an administrative law judge in recent weeks.
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The Real Story of Colorado COVID Breakthrough Cases

By Michael Roberts
  • This makes it impossible to determine the full situation regarding COVID-19 in counties such as Cheyenne, Hinsdale, Kiowa and San Juan, for which there are no numbers available at all related to both breakthrough cases and those among the unvaccinated.
  • But in Mesa County, which has a low vaccination rate, breakthrough hospitalizations hit nearly 10 percent of the total of new cases.
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Chipotle, Shake Shack Test Limits of America’s Fast-Food Love

By Tara Lachapelle
  • The concern is that restaurant valuations aren’t reflecting the uncertainty of whether these chains can sustain breakneck sales growth while absorbing the impact of higher ingredient and labor costs on their margins, Bloomberg Intelligence analysts led by Michael Halen wrote this month.
  • In light of that, it’s surprising that the same executives who are betting big on the takeout trend are pointing optimistically this earnings season to the return of in-store dining and the lunch-break crowd as vaccines loosen lockdown behaviors and some of their business starts to shift back to cities from the suburbs.
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With legislative OK, local mental health providers plan significant inpatient expansions

By Andy Steiner
  • “Every time we’ve expanded our bed capacity,” Cedermark said, “we end up running at almost 100 percent for the entirety of the school year, when mental health symptoms tend to flare up.
  • But he admits that he can’t let go of the reality that even with the moratorium in place, existing multipurpose hospitals with banked beds could have legally converted them to psych units and freed up space for young people in need of inpatient care long ago.
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Raising Wisconsin’s minimum wage would significantly cut poverty. So why is it still $7.25?

By Molly Davis and Gretchen Gerlach, Wisconsin Watch
  • Like others fed up with low earnings, McKnight recently joined the Fight for $15, a global political movement working to increase the minimum wage for all underpaid workers.
  • Because of grassroots movements like the Fight for $15 and growing political support, eight states and the District of Columbia have already passed legislation to raise the wage to $15 an hour, most recently Florida, according to the UC Berkeley Labor Center .
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GOP officials urge vaccinations but is Iowa prepared for delta variant?

By Kathie Obradovich
  • Ive said this to several Iowa reporters again this wk but I’ll amplify it here: I encourage ALL eligible Iowans/Americans to get vaccinated The Delta variant scares me so I hope those that haven’t been vaccinated will reconsider
  • U.S. Sen. Chuck Grassley took to Twitter last week to encourage all eligible Iowans and Americans to get vaccinated against COVID-19.
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Nearly 800 without power in Yorba Linda

YORBA LINDA — Nearly 800 Southern California Edison customers in Yorba Linda were without power Monday morning. The outage was reported just after 4 a.m. near an Edison facility at Fairmont Boulevard and Avenida Rio Del Oro, according to Orange County sheriff’s Lt. J. Montano. The outage was related to an Edison facility at that location, he said. He was not certain whether it was power lines downed in an early morning rain storm or a transformer fire. Edison officials were not available for comment. The Edison online outage center reported 793 customers were impacted by the outage and that repairs were not yet […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Dozens of medical groups call for mandatory health worker vaccinations – US politics live

By Joan E Greve in Washington
  • “Due to the recent Covid-19 surge and the availability of safe and effective vaccines, our health care organizations and societies advocate that all healthcare and long-term care employers require their workers to receive the Covid-19 vaccine,” the groups said in a joint statement, which was shared with the Washington Post.
  • De Blasio announced on Wednesday that all workers at city-run health care facilities and hospitals would be required to get vaccinated or receive weekly coronavirus tests.
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STAT+: Pharmalittle: A race to develop Covid-19 pills is underway; Russian trolls target Pfizer vaccine

By Ed Silverman
  • The company said the once-a-day dosing would be more convenient and began trials this month that are likely to continue until next year, but is months behind Pfizer and Merck, which have started later-stage tests of their pills.
  • Shionogi ( SGIOY ) has started human trials of the first once-a-day pill for Covid-19 patients, joining Pfizer ( PFE ) and Merck ( MRK ) in the race to find treatments for the disease, The Wall Street Journal tells us.
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Pair of 2by2 tickets worth $22,000 each sold in Lincoln, Weeping Water

  • The ticket sold in Lincoln matched all four winning numbers for Friday's 2by2 draw, netting the $22,000 prize that will expire in 180 days if it goes unclaimed, according to the Nebraska Lottery.
  • A pair of winning 2by2 lottery tickets worth $22,000 each were sold in Southeast Nebraska over the weekend — one of which came from Russ's Market on South Coddington Avenue in Lincoln.
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From homelessness to San Jose State: A Bay Area foster kid’s journey

By Marisa Kendall
  • “That’s freaking huge,” said Savonna Stender-Bondesson, director of coaching programs for Pivotal, a San Jose-based nonprofit that has helped Saechao and other foster youth with education and career opportunities.
  • With no family to fall back on, he found himself sleeping in his car — a plight that’s disturbingly common among the thousands of young people in California who, like Saechao, have aged out of foster care.
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The GOP has five factions now. They all see a different future for their party.

By Henry Olsen
  • The transformation of the Republican Party from the home of the nation’s educated business elites to one whose voters draw primarily from the working class is likely to be President Donald Trump’s most enduring legacy.
  • In each case, the new Republicans — people who voted for President Barack Obama in 2012 and Trump in 2020 — are significantly to the left of the base GOP voter.
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Brands save America?

By Emily Stewart
  • As people lose faith in government to act on sweeping issues such as climate change and guns, they’re increasingly looking to corporate America and asking whether there’s something they can do about it.
  • “I don’t think it’s bad for a company to say we’re going to do the Paris climate accord,” Kahn said.
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The uphill climb to a successful United Nations climate summit

By Ben Geman
  • A statement from G20 president Italy notes they were unable to reach agreement on coal phaseout timing, finance and a date for phasing out "inefficient" fossil fuel subsidies "despite a prolonged and tireless discussion."
  • That's important because coal is the most carbon-intensive fuel, and steep reductions are needed to keep the Paris climate agreement's goals within reach.
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Utah’s children can handle the truth of American history, George Pyle writes

By George Pyle
  • Despite what some Utah politicians, notably U.S. Rep. Burgess Owens, claim, critical race theory is the indisputably true notion that there is a lot of racism in our history, from the first slaves to the three-fifths claus to a century of Jim Crow to the number of unarmed Black people who seem to keep dying at the hands of white police officers.
  • So they have taken a previously obscure thing sometimes taught to 22-year-old law students and imagined that it is being mainlined into second-grade curricula, something called critical race theory, and blown it into something that is making a lot of people very frightened.
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Everyone in Your Organization Needs to Understand AI Ethics

By Beena Ammanath
  • It’s one thing for someone in HR to know they need to hire people that are right for the job and what that might look like while also, incidentally, being aware of the ethical risks of AI.
  • And it needs a clear C-suite leader responsible for devising and overseeing the execution of a strategy that results in organization-wide awareness — this issue won’t be taken seriously if the message doesn’t come from the top.
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A Novel That Imagines Motherhood as an Animal State

By Hillary Kelly
  • So the mother reads “A Field Guide to Magical Women,” a (sadly fictional) ethnographic catalog from 1978 by an academic named Wanda White, who was “interested in the ways in which womanhood manifests on a mythical level” and in the identities women turn to “when those available to them fail.”
  • The unnamed protagonist searches the Internet for “humans with dog teeth,” which leads her to “human animal hybrid,” and ends in the territory of so many maternal novels of yore, with “hysteria” and “rest cures” and Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s “ The Yellow Wallpaper .”
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Introducing America In Person, The Atlantic’s new section about what it means to be an American

By The Atlantic
  • “There is more than one way to think about American identity, and with these stories, we’re eager to expand on The Atlantic ’s work of helping readers explore nonmainstream narratives,” said Williams, who joined The Atlantic as a culture editor in 2018.
  • Today, The Atlantic launches America In Person, a new section dedicated to exploring the complexity and multidimensionality of American identity.
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Thoughtful prioritization and innovation in Congress is needed now more than ever

By Sen. Melisa López Franzen
  • And with measured leadership at the table in St. Paul and Washington, the opportunity is ripe for progress on longtime community priorities, from protecting access to the ballot to taking real action to address climate change.
  • But with an ambitious agenda comes the need for thoughtful issue prioritization and innovation by government leadership.
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Here’s what you said would improve the lives of Utah women

By Becky Jacobs
  • If Utah is going to shed its reputation as the worst state for women’s equality, it needs to eliminate its gender wage gap, increase the number of female leaders in business and politics in the state, and support women pursuing college degrees.
  • For instance, reducing the gender wage gap would improve the lives of Utah women, as well as how other states view Utah, readers wrote.
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Unseen side of the pandemic: An increase in scammers, making the elderly more vulnerable | Opinion

  • Elder abuse has been called the silent crime of the 21st century, affecting at least five million people each year, be they physically or emotionally harmed, hurt by intentional neglect, or robbed of money or property.
  • We worked with the officer so the woman could have her broken windows repaired and recover some of the woman’s lost money through the state’s program designed for crime victims.
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I fled Venezuela but staying in America isn’t guaranteed unless the law changes | Opinion

  • TPS is an important program that gives legal status to live and work in the U.S. to people who are fleeing emergencies such as war or natural disasters in their home countries.
  • TPS holders permanently alter their investment and consumption patterns due to the lack of certainty over their future, depriving the economy from the benefits of organized immigration.
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California educators battle over woke math

By Dan Walters
  • The draft declares that traditional math instruction, in which students progress from counting and simple arithmetic into geometry, algebra, trigonometry and eventually calculus as they advance through the grades, “has much to correct (because) the subject and community of mathematics has a history of exclusion and filtering, rather than inclusion and welcoming.”
  • “Mathematics educators have an imperative to impart upon their students the argument that mathematics is a tool that can be used to both understand and change the world,” the draft declares.
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When Do We Actually Need to Meet in Person?

By Rae Ringel
  • Now that serendipitous in-person interactions are possible, and now that we know how to do virtual work well, let’s think very carefully about whether time spent meeting might be better spent thinking, writing, or engaging in other projects.
  • Relationship-based goals, which involve strengthening or repairing connections among team members, are usually accomplished most effectively in person.
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NAACP calls for policies that punish racial harassment by public officials

By Micah Danney
  • The NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund released a statement on Thursday calling on legislative bodies to enact code-of-conduct policies that hold public officials accountable if they make personal attacks against fellow officials that rise to the level of harassment.
  • Bryant’s comments at Monday’s meeting came after someone in the audience said Bryant’s wife had used the n-word in a social media post.
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Opinion | What you need to know about the COVID-19 vaccine

By Craig Ford
  • Questions about the long-term effects of the vaccine and whether having already had COVID is enough to protect you are reasonable questions, and I completely understand why some people feel that this is a personal choice that they shouldn’t feel pressured over.
  • It’s also not clear if the antibodies you developed from getting COVID will protect you against variants of the virus like the delta variant.
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Summer Camps Across the U.S. Are Dealing With COVID-19 Outbreaks. So What Happens When School Starts?

By Tara Law
  • U.S. Public Health Service Captain Erin Sauber-Schatz, who led the task force that wrote the CDC’s camp and school guidance, says the key to containing the spread of COVID-19 in school settings is layering on different prevention strategies like masking, distancing and testing, actually enforcing them, and not removing every safety strategy at once.
  • The interdenominational church, which has five locations in and around Texas’ Galveston County, suspended in-person services through most of spring 2020, and required attendees to wear masks until this past May. When the church announced a five-day summer ministry camp for kids in grades 6 to 12 for this June, it also shared a set of protocols the camp would enforce to curb the spread of the virus: More hand-washing stations were to be installed.
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‘The worst human being’: man confronts Fox News’s Tucker Carlson – video

In a confrontation that swiftly went viral, a Montana man told theFox News host Tucker Carlson: 'You are the worst human being known to mankind.' The man, identified on Instagram as Dan Bailey, posted the video of the encounter in a sporting goods store on 23 July. Carlson, the US channel’s most-watched host, is a key influence on rightwing politics and invective and has recently come under fire forquestioning the effectiveness and safety of Covid-19 vaccineswhile refusing to say if he has had one, and for stoking racial division

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Marshall applauds decision by Biden administration to drop Critical Race Theory from education program

By Brandon Moseley
  • Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall applauded the Biden administration decision to back away from mandating Critical Race Theory in a public school history grant program.
  • “U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona announced Friday that his department would allow local schools to determine on their own what is taught in American history and civics grant programs,” Marshall said.
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Ivey blames the unvaccinated for COVID-19 cases

By Brandon Moseley
  • Alabama Governor Kay Ivey drew national headlines when she made comments that appeared to blame Alabamians who refuse to take the COVID-19 vaccine for this summer’s rise in new COVID-19 cases.
  • Ivey was vaccinated herself soon after the vaccine became available to the public and has repeatedly urged Alabamians to get the vaccine, which is free, widely available across the state, and 95 percent effective against developing serious cases of COVID-19.
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Psaki: we engage with Fox News in hope viewers might listen to medical experts

By Martin Pengelly
  • The Biden administration engages with Fox News because its viewers “might” listen to its medical experts about the need to beat the coronavirus pandemic, the White House press secretary, Jen Psaki, said.
  • Asked why any member of the administration should engage, given that Fox News was “only going to lash Democrats”, Psaki referred to primetime hosts such as Hannity and Carlson when she said: “Well first, we don’t do a lot of the personalities on Fox.
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OHA releasing ‘magic’ mushroom research this week

By Elise Haas
  • In January, the psilocybin section of the OHA started its years-long process to develop the licensing rules and regulations for psilocybin products and services as a form of therapy for mental health conditions.
  • This week, the Psilocybin Board for the Oregon Health Authority is releasing research on "magic" mushrooms’ effectiveness on behavioral health conditions like depression.
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The Health 202: Texas is cutting red tape for doctors and patients

By Alexandra Ellerbeck
  • In that system there’s not a good way to have quality or cost accountability behind these decisions,” said Bleser, whose research looks at prior authorization reform outside of fee-for-service health-care models .
  • A survey by the American Medical Association f ound that 94 percent of doctors report that their patients have experienced delays in care due to prior authorization.
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Every generation needs a dating philosophy. Better Regency romance than ‘The Rules.’

By Alyssa Rosenberg
  • It’s hilarious and dismaying to look back at “ The Rules,” the 1995 self-help book by Ellen Fein and Sherrie Schneider that became a massive hit by selling what even they admitted was the old-fashioned art of playing hard-to-get as a surefire path to a terrific marriage.
  • Despite the perennial popularity of Jane Austen, love stories set in England during the end of King George III’s reign and his sons’ monarchies might not seem like they have a lot to offer modern singles.
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Why LeVar Burton’s Jeopardy! quest feels so meaningful

By Aja Romano
  • That’s because Burton’s hosting stint is largely the result of a widespread social media campaign to land him the gig, and many people hope it will be a precursor to his full-time assumption of the role long filled by Alex Trebek .
  • But Burton would go on to hold two long-term roles that would make him even more of a fixture in households across the US: one as Geordi La Forge, the blind lieutenant commander of the starship Enterprise on Star Trek: The Next Generation, and one as the host of the PBS children’s series Reading Rainbow .
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Alabama Forestry Association endorses Steve Marshall

By Brandon Moseley
  • The Alabama Forestry Association announced last week that it has endorsed Steve Marshall for a second full term as attorney general in the 2022 election.
  • “While representing Alabama landowners and businesses in the Forestry industry, AFA stands for the same conservative values and principles that I have fought for and will continue fighting for as your Attorney General to make our state strong and prosperous.”
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“We can’t turn a blind eye”: New Denver court program for teens caught with guns aims to mitigate cycle of youth violence

By Elise Schmelzer
  • Five teenagers have been shot and killed in Denver this year as the city’s years-long youth violence epidemic continues, but leaders in the juvenile criminal legal system hope a new program will help stop the bloodshed.
  • Denver’s new Handgun Intervention Program accepted its first two participants on July 12 and is a collaboration between prosecutors, public defenders, probation officers, the juvenile court and community members, program leaders said.
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This Vermont Utility Is Revolutionizing Its Power Grid to Fight Climate Change. Will the Rest of the Country Follow Suit?

By Alejandro de la Garza
  • It’s moving away, she says, from large generator plants and long transmission lines, and toward a more decentralized approach premised on technologies like networks of utility-connected devices and new, cheaper battery storage, in a system meant to protect against massive power outages and hasten a transition away from fossil fuels.
  • “I can come up with 10,000 reasons why you wouldn’t pursue this,” says Josh Castonguay, VP of engineering and innovation at GMP, standing near a 4.9-megawatt storage battery that helps power the grid when the sun isn’t shining, and which doubles as a local energy supply for the town in an emergency.
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The Ivy League economist who became a lightning rod in the pandemic

By Anna North
  • Last spring, when the Covid-19 pandemic sent much of the country into lockdown, school buildings in all 50 states closed their doors, leaving 55 million kids to learn as best they could from their bedrooms and kitchen tables and turning working parents into full-time caregivers and amateur Zoom facilitators.
  • Some epidemiologists and public health experts say Oster underestimated the risks of opening schools, especially in Black, Latinx, and other communities hit hard by the virus.
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Cheap or free fares? RTD should take “urgent” action to lure riders back, report says.

By Jon Murray
  • While RTD leaders point to gradual ridership growth this year as an encouraging sign, the most recent monthly ridership report from May shows 58% fewer riders boarded its buses, trains and other services during that month than in May 2019.
  • “As pandemic restrictions ease and more employees return to the workplace, there is an urgent, time-limited opportunity to attract them to commute via transit before their post-pandemic behavior is locked into driving to work in a single-occupant vehicle instead,” the RTD Accountability Committee says in its final report .
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Sparked by pandemic fallout, homeschooling surges across U.S.

By David Crary
  • Although the pandemic disrupted family life across the U.S. since taking hold in spring 2020, some parents are grateful for one consequence: They’re now opting to homeschool their children, even as schools plan to resume in-person classes.
  • After experimenting with virtual learning, the couple opted to try homeschooling with a Catholic-oriented curriculum provided by Seton Home Study School, which serves about 16,000 students nationwide.
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Whistleblower lawsuit tied to botched HIV program faces critical hurdle

By Daniel Ducassi
  • Tony Cappello, former director of Disease Control and Public Health Response at the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, says the agency retaliated against him after he blew the whistle on financial mismanagement related to how the state handled federal funds for HIV programs.
  • The Colorado Sun reported at the time that in addition to returning nearly $8 million in federal funding through the federal Ryan White program aimed at helping people living with HIV and AIDS, the Colorado Attorney General’s Office advised the health department that it should no longer use supplemental drug rebate dollars for HIV prevention.
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Paulina Porizkova, A.I. Filters, and the ‘Shallow Dating Ponds’ of Middle Age

By Susanna Schrobsdorff
  • This brings me unexpectedly to supermodel Paulina Porizkova who wrote a post on Instagram this week about how she couldn’t convince a dating app called Hinge that she was herself.
  • Many dating apps do something called “collaborative filtering” where their algorithm looks at users’ chosen filters, age and other preferences, and they combine it with what they know about who those same people actually click on.
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An activewear company told customers its clothes repelled covid. The false claims led to a $3.7 million fine.

By Jonathan Edwards
  • That July, Lorna Jane launched an advertising campaign for apparel covered in a “groundbreaking” spray called LJ Shield that the company claimed would eliminate and repel covid and other viruses, bacteria and fungus.
  • Lorna Jane admitted it had made several false claims during the peak of the pandemic’s second wave in Australia but blamed a supplier for giving it bad information, the Guardian reported .
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Retailers Have Back-to-School in the Bag

  • That sets up for a strong buying season: Back-to-school spending is expected to reach an all-time high this year, according to a recent survey from the National Retail Federation and Prosper Insights & Analytics.
  • Another survey by Deloitte showed that parents expect to spend 16% more on back-to-school shopping this year, a marked uptick from the 1-3% growth rate seen in recent years.
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Escape the heat with this swanky (but dorky) $150 neck fan

By Jared Newman
  • These kinds of claims make me instinctively skeptical, but after trying out a Coolify review unit—and buying a $20 neck fan on Amazon to compare it with—I can say the fancy version is refreshing in ways that cheaper alternatives aren’t, even if I’d hesitate to call it an air conditioner myself.
  • The cooling plate approach has some other flaws as well It’s not safe to run for long stretches at a time, so Coolify shuts off the radiator after 30 minutes of use, even as the fans themselves continue to spin.
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OPINION | BRADLEY GITZ: Voting for rain

By Bradley Gitz
  • If successful, such efforts would therefore make the ratio between Groups A and B (between informed and clueless voters), which probably already tilts too much in favor of B, tilt even further.
  • They are, alas, probably greater in number than those in Group A, and the ones referred to when Winston Churchill reportedly said that the best argument against democracy was a "five-minute conversation with the average voter." That they won't vote if it takes too much trouble should raise questions about what they contribute to the commonweal on the occasions when they manage to rouse themselves.
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Letter: Bamboozled

They won’t call him “Sleepy Joe” anymore. He has been a dynamo as president, correcting a lot of the evil things done by his predecessor. The whole world loves and admires President Biden, except for some grouchy Republicans.Of course, Fox News is going to lambaste our president. This station, in co […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Monday Memories: You’re never too young to learn the rules of the road

No, yellow does not mean pedal faster. Monroe County deputy Al Snow teaches youngsters on Big Wheels® the rules of the road during a Safety City class in Bedford Township. In this 1988 Blade archive photo, Jacob Gulch, front left, seems impatient for the light to turn green. First designed in 1937 by a policeman in Mansfield, Ohio, Safety City programs have expanded from teaching preschool students traffic rules to adding lessons on community and home safety. Go to thebladevault.com/memories to purchase more historical photos taken by our award-winning staff of photographers, past and present, or to purchase combinations of stories and photos […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Whitefish Bay’s library removed a sign addressing systemic racism after community complaints, including from a former Milwaukee Buck

  • A sign addressing systemic racism was recently removed from the Whitefish Bay Public Library grounds following vocal criticism from some in the community — including former Milwaukee Bucks player Steve Novak.
  • The sign, which was placed in a rock garden display outside the library by Bay Bridge Wisconsin — a group that focuses on "raising awareness of racial and cultural bias in our community" — described its vision for the North Shore suburb.
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Merrick Garland, don’t politicize the pursuit of justice

By Jennifer Rubin
  • On Tuesday, the Justice Department and the House of Representatives will file briefs explaining to a federal court whether each believes that Rep. Mo Brooks (R-Ala.) was acting within the scope of his employment when he allegedly incited the violent attack on the Capitol and sought to subvert the peaceful transfer of power on Jan. 6.
  • This sounds absurd, but in effect Brooks is asking the Justice Department to certify that he was acting in the scope of his duties when he tried to overthrow the government.
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Boston.com readers submitted questions for the mayoral candidates about Mass. and Cass. We got their answers.

By Dialynn Dwyer
  • The questions we received from readers in May touched on housing, whether candidates plan to interact with individuals struggling with addiction, and how the city can meet the surging demand for services when most of the people seeking assistance are arriving in Boston from other municipalities.
  • In recent years, more and more people navigating substance use disorder, mental illness, and homelessness have gathered around Massachusetts Avenue and Melnea Cass Boulevard to seek services from the providers concentrated in the area.
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Overcoming Obstacles to Successful Culture Change

  • Our observations of successful cultural change efforts suggest that organizations should take an approach that starts with new actions, not with leaders identifying or articulating a desired culture.
  • Rather than merely stating a desire for a culture with greater collaboration, for example, you would encourage collaboration through actions: seeking input from others, including junior or new colleagues on the team; including end users in the solution design process from the outset rather than waiting until a new product is ready to beta test; or more actively using internal communication tools to share ideas and progress updates in real time.
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The long, costly road ahead for Winnipeg’s transit improvement plans

By Ahmar Khan
  • The city has designed a bus rapid transit (BRT) system, launched last year, to accommodate light rail transit (LRT) when the time is right, and in April, council approved a master transit plan that revamps Winnipeg Transit's route network and outlines a transition to zero-emission buses, with the full fleet becoming net zero by 2050.
  • “We're almost 50 years behind most major Canadian cities, such as Calgary, Edmonton and probably even further behind some of our larger cities,” says Jino Distasio, a University of Winnipeg urban geography professor.
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Benton County Fair moves to fall

By Mike Jones
  • "We had an opportunity to move the fair to September with a new carnival provider -- Miller Spectacular Shows -- and expect the date of the fair to be held in late September going forward," Koehler said.
  • So far, 170 4-H and Future Farmers of America participants have registered livestock for the fair, which is already more than last year, said Janice Shofner, Benton County Extension agent for 4-H youth development.
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Xcel Energy needs a smarter, greener electric grid. But should Colorado customers foot the $344 million bill for it?

By Mark Jaffe
  • That comes, however, after a 2020 residential rate increase of $1.03 per month and also with a pending request by Xcel to add $2.86 a month to residential electricity bills for the next two years to help recover the $650 million in increased fuel costs as a result of February supply disruptions from Winter Storm Uri.
  • “The question is, is there a more cost-effective way to do this,” said Cindy Schonhaut, the executive director of the state Office of Consumer Counsel, which represents residential and small commercial customers in rate cases.
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Letters: Tourists don’t pollute, support life in Hawaii; Don’t allow anti-vaxxers to get COVID treatment; Save Haiku Stairs as public safety measure

  • Josh Green need to protect Hawaii residents and go back to an intelligent tourism policy before our state becomes a COVID-19 center and our people begin dying needlessly.
  • People don’t want to get vaccinated for several reasons: I will be safe and won’t catch it; I’ve already had COVID-19 and don’t need the vaccine; religious beliefs or health restrictions.
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Next Sunday, a sermon via hologram?

By Mark A. Kellner
  • The last time the Rev. Samuel Rodriguez Jr., pastor of New Season Church in Sacramento, California, spoke on the platform at City Impact Church near Auckland, New Zealand, he wasn’t really there.
  • Unable to make his yearly visit in person because of pandemic travel restrictions and scheduling conflicts, Mr. Rodriguez’s sermon was recorded using 4K video, vertically, and projected on the stage in New Zealand using a local holographic productions firm.
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Kevin Kwan Dreams of Capri

By Sheila Yasmin Marikar
  • Early in Kevin Kwan’s latest novel, “Sex and Vanity,” a guest at a crazy, rich, partially Asian wedding on the island of Capri observes, “Everybody with money has become so cookie-cutter—they dress the same, collect the same ten artists, stay at the same hotels.”
  • “A lot of people have a fantasy of Capri,” Kwan said.
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School-race candidates hit snag on filing dates

By Cynthia Howell
  • The conflict in the school board candidate filing dates -- which prompted a recent request for an opinion from the Arkansas attorney general's office, stems from Act 349 of 2021 and its effective date, said Lucas Harder, policy service model and director for the Arkansas School Boards Association.
  • Arkansas Secretary of State John Thurston asked Attorney General Leslie Rutledge for an opinion on the July 28-to-Aug. 4 school board filing period for the November election.
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Thomas Jefferson medical students begin careers with white coats, high hopes and Narcan kits

  • This newest class of doctors-to-be comes to medicine having lived through a hundred-year pandemic, having known people who died or suffered, and having learned how a disease can upend the world.
  • Steele-Dadzie said working in a doctor’s office the last year showed her, perhaps better than anything, the human side of medicine in the face of such a dehumanizing disease.
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