Jun 21, 2021

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News from all over | Updated hourly

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Young anglers target of project

By Special to The Commercial
  • "There's no requirement on what the funds are spent on to help the team," Jeff Buckingham, Black Bass Program biologist with the commission, said in the Arkansas Wildlife Weekly newsletter.
  • Buckingham said teams can reach out to him at the Black Bass Program or contact their local fisheries biologist to help brainstorm ways to collect materials.
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Council rejects judicial election guide funding

By Michael R. Wickline
  • The state Legislative Council last week rejected Gov. Asa Hutchinson's request to grant $200,000 in state rainy-day funds to the Administrative Office of the Courts to support the Arkansas Judicial Campaign Conduct and Education Committee's judicial voter guide.
  • "I understood the need presented by the Arkansas Judicial Campaign Conduct and Education Committee when the funds were requested for the voters guide," Hutchinson said in a written statement.
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Your Face Is the Next Frontier in ESG Investing

By Mark Gilbert
  • Earlier this month, 50 global asset management firms overseeing more than $4.5 trillion pledged to press the companies they invest in to ensure facial recognition technology is developed “in an ethical way, with the right regulation and oversight.”
  • The fund management alliance is taking on some of the world’s biggest companies developing face scanning software, such as Alphabet Inc.’s Google, Apple Inc., Tencent Holdings Ltd. and Alibaba Group Holding Inc. The zeitgeist over privacy is in the group’s favor.
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Tax credit is available for self-employed caregivers

By James Hamill / For the Journal
  • The credit is available if you missed some days of self-employment because you required COVID-related care or because you had to provide such care to someone else.
  • An act called The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”), provides smaller employers refundable tax credits to reimburse the cost of providing paid sick and family leave to their employees for COVID-related leave.
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One-on-One with Patricia Marquez Knighten – director of Innovation Commercialization, NMSU’s Arrowhead Center

By Ellen Marks / For The Journal
  • The same Four Hills home has been her headquarters for the past 30 years, despite career moves and the job she started in January – director of Innovation Commercialization at New Mexico State University’s Arrowhead Center.
  • I really thought the idea of making money was important – to a large degree, just because I was a teenager who wanted that kind of shoes and my father would look at me like, ‘No, I’m not paying that kind of money for that shoe.’ It was the life of living on a constrained single-family income, and it was very funny.
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Expect lots of competition applying for remote jobs

By Dale Dauten and Jeanine J.T. O'Donnell / Syndicated Columnists
  • Instead, you should make a bucket list of companies that you would like to work for and start networking with their employees and their HR department to find out about available opportunities so you can stand out while focusing your efforts on finding a remote job that’s right for you.
  • J.T.: That’s one reason that when you go online to look at job sites, you’re going to see plenty claiming to have job postings for remote work.
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The great disconnect

By Searchlight New Mexico
  • On May 18, a judge overseeing the historic Yazzie-Martinez case ordered the New Mexico Public Education Department to take stock of the massive digital divide in the state and finally identify the roughly 76,000 students who lacked Internet connections they desperately needed for school.
  • Nearly 70 percent of Zuni Public Schools’ students — more than 900 out of 1,378 students — did not have internet at home or access to broadband, essentially locking them out of school over the past year of remote learning, the plaintiff’s technology motion said.
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Back At The Garden: Foo Fighters at 1st MSG show since COVID

By Chuck Arnold
  • With Grohl seemingly not wanting to waste a minute talking when he and his band could at long last be playing to a live audience, the Foo Fighters kept on swinging, going straight from “Times Like These” into “The Pretender.”
  • And after the Sunday-chill sounds of The Commodores’ “Easy” set the mood for them to take the stage, the hard-rocking Foo Fighters didn’t waste any time launching into what is probably their best-known tune, “Times Like These,” which would typically have been saved for the end of the show.
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Moderna, Pfizer or AstraZeneca? The ridiculous, diverting rise of vaccine envy

By Zoe Williams
  • Pfizer seems to be more effective after two doses than the AstraZeneca/Oxford vaccine (protection against hospitalisation is about 96% with Pfizer and 92% with AstraZeneca, and AstraZeneca fares worse after one shot), but this sense of prestige has nothing to do with effectiveness.
  • There’s a view that, if you get side-effects that aren’t life-threatening, you shouldn’t mention them, as you just put off other people from being vaccinated – and besides, what are you, a baby?
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Gearing up for a new industry: Small-scale cycling manufacturers riding into NM

  • Axie Navas, director of the state’s Outdoor Recreation Division, said she knows of four or five small manufacturers in the cycling industry that had moved to New Mexico or started companies here since the pandemic began.
  • The pandemic has brought about a dramatic shift within the cycling industry, driving up demand for bikes and other outdoor gear while leaving large manufacturers facing supply-chain challenges, creating opportunities for smaller companies.
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Review-Journal wins 11 awards in prestigious journalism contests

  • The RJ’s nine awards included first-, second- or third-place honors in project reporting, breaking news reporting, arts and entertainment writing, headline writing, editorial writing, informational graphics, page design and two awards for video storytelling.
  • The Las Vegas Review-Journal won nearly a dozen regional and national awards for work published in 2020, including two high-profile honors for its investigation into the deadly Alpine Motel Apartments fire.
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Tornado touches down in western suburbs, officials say

Severe weather hit the Chicago area Sunday night, including a tornado that ripped through part of the western suburbs, including the Woodridge area. | Sun-Times file photo The National Weather Service confirmed the tornado at about 11:11 p.m., near Route 53 and 75th Street in Woodridge. A tornado touched down Sunday night in west suburban Woodridge, according to the National Weather Service. The tornado was confirmed about 11:11 p.m., near Route 53 and 75th Street, the weather service said. [11:11 PM CDT] Confirmed tornado (via tornado debris signature) near route 53/75th street in Woodridge. If you’re in the path of this storm, take […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Policing fake Amazon reviews

Since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, when huge swaths of the population pivoted from brick-and-mortar to online shopping, Amazon has brought in 50 million additional Prime members and boosted its profits. The company that sells everything saw a market opportunity and grabbed hold with both hands. But as business boomed, Amazon has not adequately policed a growing shadow: fake product reviews. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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EDITORIAL: The ‘race to the top’ on corporate taxes

  • Progressives have decried a “race to the bottom” in which nations seek to attract jobs and investment by setting tax rates that don’t punish entrepreneurs and successful corporations.
  • At the top of the agenda was a plan pushed by President Joe Biden and his brain trust to unilaterally disarm in the battle for global competitiveness by imposing a “minimum” corporate statutory tax rate of at least 15 percent across major Western economies.
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4 tech podcasts you should be listening to

By Doug Aamoth
  • Episodes run a very familiar, evening-news-like 30 minutes and, as the name might suggest, drop daily.
  • It’s a rare thing for a company podcast to feel…well, less company-y, but the Postlight Podcast, from a company that helps other companies build software platforms, pulls it off in entertaining, informative, and well-produced episodes.
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Honoring Jimmy Lai

  • The CPJ notes that Mr. Lai “fights for the right of his Apple News organization to publish freely, even as China and its backers in Hong Kong use every tool to quash them.”
  • In this spirit, the CPJ on Monday announced it is honoring Hong Kong’s Jimmy Lai with its 2021 Gwen Ifill Press Freedom Award.
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As St. Paul’s Truce Center expands locations, founder spreads anti-violence message

By Mara H. Gottfried
  • After years of organizing free back-to-school haircuts, along with backpack and coat giveaways, Lewis-Frost said he wanted to do more by giving kids a safe place to go.
  • Step inside the new Truce Center in St. Paul and you’ll see framed photos on the walls — there’s Sadeya Hall, 16, Kacey Feiner, 22, and Andre Crenshaw, 17 — and more whose lives were cut short by gun violence over the years.
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Make Music Austin Day: How you can participate on Monday

AUSTIN (KXAN) — Every year, around 1,000 cities across the world take part in Make Music Day. This year, it’s being celebrated Monday in Austin — the live music capital of the world. The day is designated to celebrate and promote the natural music maker in everyone with both virtual and in-person, live music performances. "We’ve got some amazing partners nationally — worldwide actually that are going to be providing a lot of instruction free," said Tiffany Stalker of Make Music Austin. The group is planning performances in the Capitol rotunda from noon to 1 p.m. and some performances on the lawn during the day if […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Coast Guard medevacs injured hiker off Saddle Mountain

PORTLAND, Ore. (KOIN) — The U.S. Coast Guard Sector Columbia River performed a medical evacuation of an injured hiker near the top of Saddle Mountain Saturday. Seaside Police dispatch informed the Coast Guard of the injured hiker and a helicopter crew arrived at around 5:45 p.m. The Coast Guard said a Hamlet Fire and Rescue team was at the scene with the hiker, but determined it wasn’t safe to reach the woman on foot and requested the Coast Guard’s assistance. A rescue swimmer deployed from the helicopter and helped hoist the woman to safety at around 6:40 p.m. The woman was transferred to awaiting emergency medical personnel at […]Read more >Similar articles >
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How Did a Startup Win a Rare Banking License in India?

By Andy Mukherjee
  • After two years and two waves of a pandemic, the stuck savers finally have a resolution: BharatPe and a unit of Bindra’s Centrum Capital Ltd. will put their financial businesses into a newly licensed bank tasked with making small-ticket loans to unbanked segments of the population.
  • BharatPe, a barely three-year-old payments startup, is going to be the half-owner of a bank in India — a prize that has eluded many of the country’s pedigreed tycoons.
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Sticker shock has some Twin Cities apartment developers in retreat

By Jim Buchta
  • With demand for rentals in the Twin Cities on the upswing this summer, the escalating cost of building apartments is delaying projects and forcing developers to put others on hold.
  • Doran said the cost of the additional phases of his Triple Crown project in Shakopee and the Reserve at Arbor Lakes in Maple Grove, have risen $8 million from initial phases primarily because of lumber prices.
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Santa Anita: Warren’s Showtime wins Wilshire Stakes

By Art Wilson
  • Warren’s Showtime came charging home from next-to-last in the eight-horse lineup of older fillies and mares under Juan Hernandez, beating pacesetter Leggs Galore by 1 1/4 lengths as the 2-1 favorite.
  • Perhaps none more so than Warren’s Showtime, the in-the-money machine who won the $100,000 Grade III Wilshire Stakes on closing day of Santa Anita’s winter-spring meet Sunday.
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Close Up: Reynolds takes legal action to “back the blue” with new law

  • This is K C C I eight News close up Iowa took new steps to back the blue legally the governor signed a law that fulfills her and other republicans campaign promise to protect police officers while keeping Iowans safe from violent protests.
  • And that is something that we owe the officers in my opinion, in many respects, is because what I don't want to have is an officer that's afraid to do or or a female issue, that's afraid to do what they've been called to do because they're worried about getting sued, um that they don't intervene, that they just stay in their car um as opposed to going out and engaging with the public or protecting um an individual or taking a dangerous individual off the street.
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Mountain biking trail slated for St. Cloud-area park

By Jenny Berg
  • But before Sartell officials can transform some of the 45-acre Sauk River Regional Park into trails fit for fat tires and mountain bikes, they're hoping to swap land with St. Cloud to create a contiguous area on the western side of the river.
  • In May, Sartell City Council approved an agreement with Colorado-based International Mountain Bicycling Association to design the bike trail, which is aimed at beginner- to intermediate-level bikers and will include a practice area near the trailhead.
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Hospitals, nursing homes in Minnesota not mandating COVID-19 vaccine — yet

By Joe Carlson
  • Following a closely watched legal battle over a COVID-19 vaccine mandate for staff at a Houston health system — a battle that the hospital won — no hospital or nursing home in Minnesota has imposed a COVID-19 vaccine mandate on its workers, people in the industry say.
  • At Hennepin Healthcare, about 85% of employees had received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine as of June 7, while 81% of staff at Mayo Clinic's facilities in the Midwest have had at least one shot, health system spokeswomen said.
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COVID-19 pandemic brings workforce crisis of veterinary field into focus

  • "People who are into it, they know how much fun it is and want to have a playmate for their pet when they go back to work."While an increase in pet adoptions is generally a good thing, it also means that veterinarians and vet techs have to see more patients, field more calls from pet owners, which sometimes result in delayed visits and care.
  • So that's where I think every crisis like (the pandemic) drives innovation." Cushing says that veterinary medicine is a conservative field and that, on the whole, vets "don't welcome change." He says the field is about 25 years behind human medicine in terms of delegation of tasks and proper use of staff.Some schools, such as Lincoln Memorial University, are starting to institute a middle ground master's degree, akin to a nurse practitioner, that would allow for positive movement up the ladder.
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New law funds 3 mental health sessions for Colorado youth

  • AURORA | Nearly a month after Children’s Hospital Colorado sounded alarms on the number of young people seeking mental health help, a new law has been signed by Gov. Jared Polis that will connect young people to services and provide them with up to three free sessions with a mental health care provider.
  • The legislation provides $9 million in order to create a temporary youth mental health services program in the Office of Behavioral Health in the state’s Department of Human Services.
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Kansas City Royals top Red Sox 7-3

  • — Jarrod Dyson capped a 10-pitch at-bat with a tiebreaking, two-run double in a three-run third inning off Nathan Eovaldi, and the Kansas City Royals rallied to beat the Boston Red Sox 7-3 Sunday for their first series win in nearly three weeks.
  • Mike Minor (6-4) allowed two runs and nine hits over 6⅔ innings for the Royals, who had lost 12 of their previous 14 games.
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How Charles Schulz created his iconic ‘Peanuts’ characters

  • That opens the door for writer/director Michael Bonfiglio to recount Schulz’s (and, by extension, Charlie Brown’s) story, starting with Schulz’s childhood as a painfully shy boy in Minnesota nicknamed “Sparky” — after a comic-strip character called “Sparkplug.”
  • Bonfiglio does a nice job recounting that history through the use of archival interviews with Schulz, and new interviews with his wife, Jean — which are interspersed with excerpts of the many “Peanuts” TV specials that began airing in the mid-’60s, in color, as it continued to evolve with the changing times.
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Soviets once denied an anthrax leak, and US scientists backed the story

By Anton Troianovski
YEKATERINBURG, Russia — Patients with unexplained pneumonias started showing up at hospitals; within days, dozens were dead. The secret police seized doctors’ records and ordered them to keep silent. US spies picked up clues about a lab leak, but local authorities had a more mundane explanation: contaminated meat. It took more than a decade for the truth to come out. […]Read more >Similar articles >

Generally Clear Father’s Day But Rain Returns To Start The Week

By Riley Blackwell
As Tropical Storm Claudette moves out of our area, general clearing is expected throughout the day, with a passing shower or two possible in the afternoon due to remnants of Claudette. Temperatures will stay slightly below average, hovering in the mid to upper 80s for the weekend, with lows in the low to mid 70s. However, rain chances begin to trend upwards to start the week, as a front is expected to pass through and give us a fairly good chance for rain and storms; some which could be on the heavier side. A cloudy start to Monday is also expected, with those clouds persisting throughout the day. A similar story for Tuesday is anticipated […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Timbers, Thorns welcome largest crowds in almost a year and a half

By Amanda Arden
PORTLAND, Ore. (KOIN) — It was an exciting weekend at Providence Park as both the Timbers and Thorns played at home with the most fans they’ve had in the stands in almost a year and a half. Providence Park is now up to 80% capacity. Fans at the stadium Sunday were thrilled to be back, but still getting used to the large crowd size. “I think they’ve done a great job with safety protocols and keeping everyone safe,” said Tracy Sebben. “The excitement’s there. The players are reacting to it. It just feels really good,” said Nicole Marshall. Sunday was also a crowd-pleaser. The Thorns came away with a 1-0 win over Kansas […]Read more >Similar articles >
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COVID tracker: Vaccination rates slow way down but so far, COVID-19 improvement is continuing

  • The vaccination rate is getting close to stalling out in New Hampshire: only about 4% of the state population has become fully vaccinated so far this month by the state’s reckoning and barely 1% got their first shot.
  • The CDC is also pointing to a small but worrisome increase in COVID-19 hospitalization rates for teenagers, a group with low vaccination rates because they have only been eligible for shots for a few weeks.
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Cyclists using trails more, bike lanes less

By the drive, | Tim Harlow
  • Trail usage was up 39% while the number of cyclists riding on the side of the road or in bike lanes fell 13% last year when compared with counts collected in 2019, according to new unpublished research from the University of Minnesota's Center for Transportation Studies (CTS).
  • Bicyclists took more rides on trails and used shoulders and bike lanes a lot less as the COVID-19 pandemic led to a shift in when, where and why cyclists rode.
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Could your medication raise your risk for heat-related illness?

By Ashley Michels/KDVR
  • When temperatures reach into the 90s, more people seek medical attention for heat-related illnesses, said Dr. Vik Bebarta, emergency medicine physician and toxicologist at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital.
  • He said some cause dehydration, some can raise a person’s internal body temperature, and some prevent sweating, which is the body’s natural cooling system.
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D.C. motorcade celebrates role of Black fathers on Father’s Day

By Jasmine Hilton
  • Holding “Black Fathers Matter” signs and watching the boys as they played next to him, Smith spoke of creating memories with his sons and the need for recognizing Black men in the community.
  • At the second annual D.C. Black Fathers Matter event on Father’s Day, attendees gathered Sunday morning at the African American Civil War Museum to begin a celebration of Black fathers before a motorcade procession through the District.
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Graham says bipartisan infrastructure deal possible

By Boston Herald Wire Services
  • A senior Republican senator said a $579 billion bipartisan accord on infrastructure is on the table and he challenged President Biden to decide whether he wants to pursue it.
  • The White House on Friday reiterated Biden’s opposition to indexing the gasoline tax to inflation to help pay for an infrastructure plan, raising questions about the viability of the bipartisan compromise emerging in the Senate.
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Models predict U.S. coronavirus infections could surge this fall if vaccination rates lag, former FDA chief says

By Washington Post
  • The transmission of the more contagious Delta variant in the United States could spur a fall surge in coronavirus infections if only 75% of the country’s eligible population is vaccinated, former Food and Drug Administration chief Scott Gottlieb said Sunday.
  • Former FDA chief Scott Gottlieb said states with low vaccination rates are already showing a concerning rise in cases of the Delta variant.
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The Art and Accounting of Joint Ventures

By Shuli Ren
  • Apart from prettying up the balance sheet and passing Beijing’s three red lines, this joint-venture structure allows companies to rely on capital contributions from its partners to finance its expansion, instead of seeking debt funding from the broader marketplace.
  • In the last year, companies have used their connections in Hong Kong to issue sizable off-balance-sheet dollar bonds, and deployed convoluted corporate structures to hide debt in order to meet Beijing’s new financing rules.
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Wellesley’s Webb wins 400 hurdles, Natick girls take home Div. 1 South sectional title

By Joe Reardon
  • Just an eighth-grader, the Weymouth runner pulled away from Boston College-bound Kate Connolly of Natick to win the 2-mile (11:25.21) in hot, humid conditions.
  • There was an early team battle between Natick and Wellesley, but the Red Hawks rallied behind a sweep of the pole vault by Noa Weinhaus (10-0), Hannah Takasaki (9-6) and Alyssa Peasley (8-0) on the way to first with 95 points.
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Boston Black fathers, clergy to call for summer of peace

By Joe Dwinell
Peacemakers are being urged to gather at the Ella J. Baker House at 3 p.m. Sunday to curb violence as the summer approaches. The Rev. Eugene Rivers, clergy and area Black fathers will join in issuing a national Father’s Day call for 1,000 churches across the country to put boots on the ground for a Summer of Peace. “We’re challenging Black fathers and men to teach our children how to keep away from violence,” Rivers said, “and the importance of working with the police.” Rivers called the Boston Police Department “one of the best in the country,” adding there’s always room for improvement, but curbing violence must be the focus. It starts, […]Read more >Similar articles >
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‘Just a real conversation’: How Austin mental health experts tailor men’s treatment

By Kelsey Thompson
  • But an added layer of nuance are the discrepancies in how men of different age ranges and racial and ethnic groups discuss mental health issues and access treatment.
  • When it comes to public conversations surrounding mental health, social stigmas and taboos can still make the topic a difficult one to talk about — even more so for men.
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Pakistan’s PM won’t condemn China’s Uyghur treatment after decrying Islamophobia elsewhere

By Zachary Basu
  • But Khan has been totally silent about China's detention of more than 1 million Muslim minorities just across his border.
  • Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan repeatedly refused to acknowledge China's repression of Uyghur Muslims during an interview with "Axios on HBO," deflecting to other global human rights issues and citing China's denial of the crackdown in Xinjiang.
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How Long Can America Keep Borrowing?

  • President Clinton asked us in 1994 to chair the Bipartisan Commission on Entitlement and Tax Reform to study the future of Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid and recommend measures to assure their long-term viability.
  • In 1994 the budget deficit was $203 billion (2.8% of gross domestic product), and the national debt was $3.4 trillion (47.8% of GDP).
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The Biden Budget’s Arithmetic Problem

  • To begin, the Biden budget would compromise the federal government’s ability to provide public goods and social insurance, handle crises like pandemics or financial panics, and address gaps in economic opportunity—all while handing a hefty debt-service bill to future generations that will benefit very little from today’s spending blitz.
  • Permanent new social spending should be financed by incremental tax revenue so it doesn’t add to already elevated deficit and debt levels.
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Give Peruvians Their Day in Court

  • The China card that Mr. Castillo is expected to play is one reason Peruvians, along with the U.S. and other democracies, have an interest in a transparent review of contested votes from the June 6 runoff presidential election.
  • It isn’t hyperbole to say that he believes that 50.1% of the vote entitles the winner to steamroll the rights of the other 49.9%.
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Scoop: White House eyes ending migrant family expulsion by July 31

By Stef W. Kight
  • The White House is considering ending — as early as July 31 — the use of a Trump-era public health order that's let U.S. border officials quickly turn back migrant families to Mexico, Axios has learned.
  • Why it matters: The policy known as Title 42 has resulted in tens of thousands of migrant family members, including asylum seekers, being sent away — as well as thousands of kids then separating from their families to cross into the United States alone.
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The fight for four miles in Rock Creek Park

By Letters to the Editor
  • In the past year, I have run more than 315 miles and biked more than 100 miles on Beach Drive alone; I have spent more than 75 hours sweating, walking and occasionally crying on those four closed-off miles.
  • Regarding the June 13 Metro article “ Part of Beach Drive will stay closed to cars as permanent plan is studied ”:
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Immigrant workers, allies embark on nine-day march to Madison to call for immigration reform in Wisconsin and nationally

  • Over the course of nine days, a core group of eight to 10 marchers affiliated with Voces de la Frontera is marching from Milwaukee to Madison to pressure the Biden administration to add a pathway to citizenship in the American Jobs Plan, a $1.9 trillion infrastructure proposal, and the state legislature to allow undocumented immigrants to get driver’s licenses.
  • Elections won’t matter if Democrats don’t deliver on their promises for major reforms,” Christine Neumann-Ortiz, executive director of Voces de la Frontera, said of the need to use budget reconciliation for immigration measures.
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Holy haircut! To celebrate face-to-face worship, Tustin pastor finally gets a trim

By Susan Christian Goulding
  • Steve Ranney, pastor at Tustin Presbyterian Church, quit cutting his hair in Dec. 2019 as a sign of “lament” that his congregation was not able to meet in person.
  • Steve Ranney, pastor at Tustin Presbyterian Church, quit cutting his hair as a “sign of lament” that his congregation could not meet in person due to coronavirus restrictions.
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Haiti’s difficult elections

By Letters to the Editor
  • The June 14 editorial “ Haiti’s ‘descent into hell,’ ” which urged that elections go forward in Haiti despite the chaotic situation there, seemed to put ritual democracy ahead of real democracy.
  • Decades ago, U.S. policymakers developed a healthy respect for the utility of having an elected Haitian president to counter claims for political asylum.
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The Fair Labor Standards Act sought to exclude minorities

By Letters to the Editor
  • The FLSA led to lower, not higher, standards of living for Black and Brown people, who entered domestic service and farming because they were excluded from other jobs as “unemployables.”
  • In his June 14 Federal Insider column, “ Democrats push to undo New Deal’s racist aspects,” Joe Davidson wrote that by setting a federal minimum wage, the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 “was a major step toward improving the lives of American workers.”
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8 kids in youth van among the 12 lives lost to Claudette

By JEFF AMY and AMY FORLITI
  • The crash happened Saturday about 35 miles (55 kilometers) south of Montgomery on Interstate 65 after vehicles likely hydroplaned on wet roads, said Butler County Coroner Wayne Garlock.
  • "This is the worst tragedy I've been a part of in my life," said Smith, who drove Sunday to the ranch to talk to the remaining residents, who had returned from Gulf Shores in a separate van and did not see the wreck.
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Higher water rates for unincorporated customers back before Tucson City Council

  • Ultimately, Avery recommended any differential rate adopted undergo a cost-of-service study before final adoption in order to withstand any legal challenges to the reasonability of the rates.
  • Before mayor and council voted unanimously to begin the process of raising water rates for unincorporated customers on April 6, the Pima County Board of Supervisors voted 3-2 to publicly oppose differential water rates.
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Denver-based Truewerk apparel startup for blue-collar workers raises another $2M

By Lucy Peterson
  • Truewerk, a startup founded in 2015 that makes and sells high-performing apparel for blue-collar workers, is using the money raised from internal investors to increase production and inventory.
  • “A lot of apparel brands that have seasonality to them, especially at the back end of the year, there’s a big surge of inventory that has to be filled for fall delivery,” Ciciora said.
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Is it better to get immunity from catching COVID-19 — or from vaccines? What science shows

By Katie Camero

Research shows both coronavirus infection and vaccination offers immunity that can protect people from getting sick again. But by how much and for how long remains unclear — a scientific gap that only time could fill. Regardless of how immunity is acquired, there’s no telling whose bodies will or won’t create effective antibodies, and why […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Dog earns 6M followers while learning to communicate with humans

By Nichole Berlie
  • "One of the things that is most impactful to me is how how many people have have DM me and just said we don't ever plan to use the buttons, but what I'm learning from you is that we need to take the time to listen to our animals.
  • More than six million people have tuned in to see Bunny, a one-year-old sheepadoodle, learn to communicate using a custom series of buttons created by her owner Alexis Divine.
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Pace of Massachusetts job gains continued to slow during May

Massachusetts employers added 9,200 jobs in May and the statewide unemployment rate fell 0.3 percentage points to 6.1%, according to the state’s latest labor report. The pace of job gains slowed from the revised 10,200 positions businesses added in April, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics figures cited by the Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development. That continues a deceleration, from from 37,900 jobs added in January to 19,700 in February, 14,800 in March, 10,200 in April and now 9,200 in May. The unemployment rate dropped from a revised April 2021 rate of 6.4% to 6.1% in May. The jobless rate stood at 16.4% in April […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Democrats’ domestic agenda faces setbacks by Republican obstructionism

By Edward Helmore
  • On a number of key fronts such as pushing election reform and voting rights, efforts to curb gun control and to moving forwards on LGBTQ civil rights, there has been an effective push back by Republicans – and a handful of conservative Democrats – that is forcing Biden and the wider Democratic party on to the back foot.
  • On Sunday, Ohio Republican senator Rob Portman shot down amendments proposed by West Virginia’s conservative Democrat Joe Manchin, whose rejection of the initial bill all-but scuttled the Democrats’ project.
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‘Thankful to God, I’m safe.’ Three refugees became Idahoans. Here are their stories

  • That’s why it’s called their home,” said Palina Louangketh, founder and executive director of a nonprofit that plans to open a museum in Boise dedicated to telling the stories of people forced out of their homelands.
  • When the Idaho Capital Sun asked three local refugees why they or their families chose to leave their original home countries, their answers were the same: Staying would have meant death, danger or misery.
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The ‘naggy’ sitcom wife finally gets her due in ‘Kevin Can F**k Himself’

By Lauren Sarner
  • “That first image came to me with a woman in her sitcom living room with her husband … She walks into the kitchen and suddenly we see her up close and it looks very different.
  • “To me, the format switch [jumping between sitcom and drama] is a metaphor for the benefit of the doubt that we’ve given Kevins forever,” creator Valerie Armstrong told The Post.
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The UN has condemned Myanmar’s military coup. Will that matter?

By Cameron Peters
  • More than four months after the military seized power in Myanmar, the United Nations General Assembly took the rare step on Friday of voting to formally condemn the February 1 coup and called for an end to arms dealing with the country.
  • With the support of 119 countries, the UN General Assembly adopted a resolution that calls on Myanmar’s military junta to restore the democratic transition and calls on all member states “to prevent the flow of arms into Myanmar.”
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Accidents can happen: On the Internet, embarrassment is just one errant tap away

By John Kelly
  • Digital natives know that liking a person’s three-year-old Instagram post means you’ve been obsessively scrolling through their photos, creepily stalking them.
  • Before the Internet, if you really wanted to embarrass yourself accidentally, you had to attend a swanky soiree with toilet paper stuck to the bottom of your shoe or bad-mouth your boss’s wife without knowing she was standing right behind you.
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This bill was meant to protect California workers from COVID. Some counties use it to protect employers instead.

By Fiona Kelliher
  • This news organization requested specific workplace outbreak data — including worksites, dates, locations and numbers of cases — from all 58 California counties and the three cities with their own public health departments.
  • The material collected by this news organization, incomplete as it is, shows the value of workplace transparency: Contra Costa County said for the first time that 171 cases occurred at a HelloFresh food delivery warehouse last summer, a revelation to workers there.
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State budget process is broken

By Jon Coupal
  • Some bills that would otherwise require a two-thirds vote can suddenly become an “amendment” into a budget bill, and then they can be passed with only a simple majority.
  • Since the passage of Proposition 25 more than a decade ago, the California Legislature has passed what can only be described as fake budgets.
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Republicans Get A Move On Disempowering People Whose Job Is To Uphold Democracy

By Charlotte Klein
  • “Members of at least 10 county election boards have been removed, had their position eliminated or are likely to be kicked off through local ordinances or new laws passed by the state legislature,” the Times reports .
  • Their efforts result from new voting laws that have allowed the GOP to wrest election power from these authorities and give state Republicans heightened control over the voting process.
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Clippers’ Tyronn Lue reflects on Black coaches’ success this season

By Mirjam Swanson
  • Lue said he doesn’t feel burdened as a representative of the Black coaching fraternity, insisting that by just doing a good job – see: the Cleveland Cavaliers’ first NBA title and three consecutive NBA Finals and, now, a first conference finals berth for the Clippers – he’ll help inspire progress.
  • “I think a lot of openings this summer, hopefully a lot of GMs and owners will see that Black coaches are good coaches and hope they give an opportunity for the young coaches coming up today.”
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Delta variant of coronavirus starting to become prevalent in unvaccinated UK communities, Gottlieb says

By ooshin@thehill.com (Olafimihan Oshin)
  • “It doesn't necessarily appear more pathogenic, meaning more dangerous, but it's infecting people more easily and it's starting to become very prevalent in the UK in communities that are unvaccinated,” Gottlieb told Dickerson.”
  • During an appearance on CBS’s “Face The Nation”, Gottlieb told host John Dickerson that the delta variant, a more infectious strain of the virus that has surged in the U.S. since spring, doesn’t appear to be more dangerous than other variants of the virus, but he noted it is infecting more members of unvaccinated communities, especially children.
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How our ancestors conquered the dark to produce the world’s oldest art

  • To shed light on how Stone Age artists might have worked in these dark, hard-to-access spaces, archaeologists in Spain have scoured the archaeological record to look for evidence of how early humans used wood and other substances to make torches and lamps that could have illuminated their stone canvas.
  • Based on archaeological evidence found in Stone Age caves, researchers made their own versions of prehistoric torches and grease lamps that would have been used by early humans to illuminate caves.
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Law Beat: Top state court officials urging Cuomo to veto bill

By Robert Gavin

A bill awaiting action from Gov. Andrew Cuomo would change just one word in the approval process for state Supreme Court justices who want to stay on the bench past the mandatory retirement age of 70.But that change would be ill-conceived, costly and possibly unconstitutional, according to a top state court official who will be urging the governor to veto the legislation when it reaches his desk.“This is a really bad bill,” Lawrence K. Marks, the chief administrative judge for the Unified Court System, told Law Beat.

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Here’s what you need to know about the app that’s turning everyone into a cartoon character

By Rich DeMuro
  • Voila AI Artist is a photo editing app for iOS and Android that uses artificial intelligence to turn your pictures into a Renaissance-era painting, Pixar-inspired cartoon and more.
  • The app is free to use on both platforms but there are ads, along with a subscription to get rid of them and access "faster processing." I found that processing my picture was relatively fast, even without a subscription.
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The remarkable career of nightlife impresario Ava Berman

  • Currently, Berman and Adley are developing their own online streaming network, planning the next version of their two-day Ocean Aid benefit music festival in Hawaii, and working on their most ambitious project yet, Hotel Indigo/Central Las Vegas, a $100 million boutique hotel to be erected on the property behind the Fremont Country Club.
  • It’s telling that they spend so much time downtown these days: With their Fremont Country Club, Berman and Adley have become synonymous with the renewal of the Fremont East District, which in the last decade, has gone from dime-store dead zone to hipster hot spot.
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Proposed Concord budget will draw from city’s rainy day fund, increase spending

  • Much of the new spending is due to wage increases and benefits for municipal employees, including a rise in the city’s required contribution to the state retirement system that will add more than $1 million.
  • For the second year in a row, the Concord City Council is expected to pull from its savings and hopes to use federal aid to pay for new spending and avoid a spike in taxes.
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Explainer: What is the Catholic Communion controversy?

By Peter Smith
  • The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops overwhelmingly approved the drafting of a document “on the meaning of the Eucharist in the life of the Church” that some bishops hope will be a rebuke for politicians who support abortion rights but continue to receive Communion.
  • They added that the “weaponizing” of Communion for those who support abortion rights is inconsistent, since bishops haven’t targeted Catholic politicians who back other policies that contradict church teachings, such as the death penalty or hard-line immigration and asylum stances.
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The Joe Biden I knew and now disagree with

By Richard Boddie
  • 1967 was a good year at Syracuse Law, with moot court and Moot Court (Honors) Board, social gatherings, where Joe and I were generally the only two or three voices in any debate regarding what is now called “social justice.”
  • But most of all I hope that Joe Biden does not repeat the typical neocon “policing the world for democracy” policy that President Barack Obama continued.
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What’s in your fridge? New York’s mayoral race descends to salmon and sneakers | Emma Brockes

By Emma Brockes
  • Meanwhile, it is hard not to love the storyline still playing out around Eric Adams, Brooklyn borough president and current frontrunner in the primary and therefore the election: that he secretly lives in New Jersey.
  • I t is hard to pick a favourite moment from the New York mayor’s race, entering its final stage of the primaries this week.
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Black market marijuana grows are popping up faster than law enforcement can take them down. But is legalization the cause?

By Sam Tabachnik
  • But last month, nearly 12 years to the day after they were arrested the first time, Deng and his wife Kelly Chuong were accused by federal investigators of participating in a similar black market marijuana scheme — an operation the now-former U.S. attorney for the District of Colorado in 2019 called the largest marijuana bust in state history.
  • Federal prosecutors have divulged little about their case against the couple beyond the just-filed charges, but local drug investigators in 2019 pegged Deng and Chuong as leaders of the drug trafficking organization, according to arrest warrant affidavits for other suspects filed at the time in Arapahoe and Adams county district courts.
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The Libertarian Party, born in Colorado 50 years ago, still seeks elusive mainstream acceptance

By Jon Murray
  • A political analyst who studies third parties said the intensifying polarization of recent years offers an opportunity for the Libertarians to appeal to disaffected Republicans who aren’t on board with where former President Donald Trump has taken the party.
  • Now based in Alexandria, Virginia, it’s the most successful minor party in the modern era, with nearly 700,000 registered voters in the 30 or so states and the District of Columbia that allow Libertarian as an option.
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How Colorado lawmakers changed policing in their first full session since George Floyd protests

By Elise Schmelzer
  • In their first full legislative session since mass protests over police brutality, Colorado lawmakers passed bills to regulate use of force, expand alternatives to policing and make police actions and discipline more transparent to the public.
  • Under HB21-1030, Colorado law enforcement, public health agencies and social service providers will have access to $2 million for alternatives to police responses.
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Fans celebrate at Boots in the Park music festival, the first since COVID-19 mandates lifted

By Kelli Skye Fadroski
  • Boots in the Park — with Chris Young, Scotty McCreery, Dylan Scott, Tenille Townes, Leaving Austin and Tim Hurley — is the first major in-person festival to happen in Southern California after the COVID-19 mandates lifted in the state on June 15.
  • Country artist Tim Hurley poses for pictures with music fans following his set at Boots in the Park at Silverlakes in Norco on Saturday, June 19, 2021.
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