Aug 01, 2021

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Three-month closure starts Aug. 2 for U.S. 285 bridge replacement project

By Stephanie Butzer
A new $2.6 million bridge replacement project on U.S. 285 began in early July and a three-month full closure of the highway starts Aug. 2. The Colorado Department of Transportation said crews will replace a bridge and its railings, rebuild the approach to the bridge, and replace the guardrail. The project also includes wetland mitigation and a stream diversion. The work has multiple locations in Park County, including U.S. 285 at milepoint 172.2 to 173.5, State Highway 9 at milepoint 63, and U.S. 24 at milepoint 47.5. CDOT said the bridge over the South Fork South Platte River, which is between Antero Junction and Fairplay, has had to close […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Florida breaks record for new coronavirus cases as surge of infections rips through state

By Timothy Bella and Meryl Kornfield
  • Florida reported 21,683 new coronavirus cases on Friday, the state’s highest one-day total since the start of a pandemic, according to data released Saturday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • The Florida Department of Health reported that coronavirus cases in the state had jumped 50 percent in the past week.
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Kemp the first to set up newly legal unlimited donation committee

By James Salzer - The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
  • State Sen. Jen Jordan, D-Atlanta, who is running for attorney general in 2022 and spoke against the legislation during debate on the Senate floor, said groups that by law can hide donors would still be able to give massive amounts of money to the new committees.
  • If Kemp, as expected, gets past the primary, he may face a rematch with his 2018 general election opponent, Democrat Stacey Abrams, who set fundraising records that year and whose voting rights group, Fair Fight, has raised more than $100 million since then .
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Woman urges people to get vaccinated after losing her dad, brother to COVID-19 in same week

  • "I mean, I wish it wasn't me, but I sure wouldn't wish it on anybody."She said her mom was well enough to come home on Friday night but is heartbroken after losing her oldest son and her husband of more than 38 years.The family was scared to get the vaccine, McCall said, because they have health conditions and didn't know how their bodies would react to the shots."We weren't trying to convince anyone not to get it," she said.
  • He got worse and had to be admitted nine days later.'People envied how good of a daddy he was'McCall said her dad was her hero and that he did everything in his power to make sure that she didn't want or need anything -- he'd go and fill her car up with gas even after she was an adult."Oh my God, we were so tight," she said.
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Kinzinger: McCarthy and Jordan should face 6 January subpoenas – but maybe not Trump

By Martin Pengelly
  • Adam Kinzinger, one of two Republicans on the House select committee investigating the US Capitol assault, will support subpoenas for testimony from Kevin McCarthy, the Republican minority leader, and senior members of the congressional GOP including Jim Jordan, a prominent Trump ally from Ohio.
  • “I want to know what the president was doing every moment of that day after he said, ‘I’m going to walk with you to the Capitol,’” Kinzinger told ABC, referring to Trump’s remarks at a rally near the White House on 6 January, before Congress was stormed.
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COVID spotlighted Colorado’s health inequities. Will efforts to address racial disparities remain post-pandemic?

By Meg Wingerter
  • Dr. Camara Phyllis Jones, an epidemiologist who specializes in the health effects of racism, said in a webinar that it’s noteworthy that cities and states are declaring racism a public health threat, but that doesn’t mean much if they don’t make it clear how they’re going to tackle systems that reproduce worse outcomes for people of color — and then put money into making changes.
  • Williams, with the Black Community Health Action Response Team, said some of the factors driving health disparities in Denver can’t be fully addressed without significant changes to the way the environment is set up, so that people aren’t living in heavily polluted neighborhoods.
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Washington ready to tax cryptocurrency trades, eyes $28 billion to help pay for infrastructure

By Kery Murakami
  • The legislation, which was being finalized Sunday, would raise an estimated $28 billion by requiring cryptocurrency brokers and investors to report transactions to the Internal Revenue Service .
  • The Blockchain Association, an advocacy group for the cryptocurrency industry, argues that new IRS reporting rules would undermine the development of the U.S. currency market.
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Lollapalooza cancels DaBaby’s performance amid backlash over homophobic comments

By Tom Schuba
  • DaBaby has come under heavy fire after he went on a controversial rant last week at the Rolling Loud music festival that targeted gay people and those living with sexually transmitted diseases.
  • DaBaby, real name Jonathan Kirk, has come under heavy fire after he went on a controversial rant last Sunday at the Rolling Loud music festival in Miami Gardens, Florida, that targeted gay people and those living with sexually transmitted diseases.
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Gridlock Guy: Biggest piece and biggest change of GA-400/I-285 project opens

By Doug Turnbull - for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
In one of the biggest changes for Atlanta drivers from the I-285 Georgia 400 project, drivers who exit I-285 Westbound to Roswell Road will need to exit sooner, near Peachtree Dunwoody Road. That is more than 2 miles earlier, so Georgia DOT says move over to the right as you pass the Ashford Dunwoody Road exit. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Pandemic food program has sent $300 million to Colorado parents this summer

By Justin Wingerter
  • Colorado’s state government has paid the parents of 306,000 low-income kids an estimated $300 million this summer to make up for meals children did not receive at school during times of remote learning last school year – $100 million more than the state had anticipated.
  • And more than $200 million is still to come from the Pandemic Electronic Benefit Transfer, or P-EBT, program — a large-scale attempt by the government to alleviate the dramatic increases in hunger that Colorado and the nation saw during the pandemic.
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Taylor Street Little Italy festival canceled again; organizer vows to return in 2022

By Manny Ramos
  • The Taylor Street Little Italy Festa has been canceled for the second year, with organizers saying holding the event would put an additional strain on already struggling businesses.
  • Ron Onesti, president of Onesti Entertainment, said it would be irresponsible of him to put on the festival, given that so many businesses are already stretched thin for staff.
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San Jose Jazz Summer Fest grows in stages this year

By Anne Gelhaus
  • While Summer Fest usually sees acts on indoor stages in downtown San Jose, two of the usual festival venues—The Fairmont Hotel and Café Stritch—closed during the pandemic.
  • “We were just focused on the main stage, but then we decided to tie in with the Fountain Blues Festival, which didn’t happen this year,” says Artistic and Festival Director Bruce Labadie.
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Certain countries ‘should not be here’, says US swimmer Lilly King – video

The ongoing doping war of words has continued after Lilly King said that 'a lot of people here that should not be here'. King made her statements seated next to Ryan Murphy, another US swimmerwho appeared to take aim this weekat Russia, who have run afoul of doping rules. King later added: 'I wasn't racing anyone from a country who should have been banned and instead got a slap on the wrist and rebranding of their national flag.'

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >
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At some California hospitals, nearly half of workers remain unvaccinated

By Teri Sforza
  • Officials said about 30% of employees at Los Angeles County hospitals — including “safety net” facilities that care for uninsured and underinsured patients — were still unvaccinated, though federal figures put the unvaccinated rate far closer to 50% at County USC Medical Center in Los Angeles and County Olive View-UCLA Medical Center in Sylmar, and at 38% at County Harbor-UCLA Medical Center near Torrance.
  • Yet after a frenetic rollout and urgent pleas from officials on nearly-bent knees, almost a quarter of California’s hospital workers remained unvaccinated for COVID-19, according to federal data .
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Yet another reason we need fewer political appointees

By Jennifer Rubin
  • The Office of Cybersecurity, Energy Security and Emergency Response (CESER) might not be well-known, but it is a critical entity within the Energy Department that is in charge of responding to natural and man-made emergencies impacting our power — from the Texas electric grid disaster to the pipeline hack.
  • The system is supposed to give Congress oversight control, but too often it leaves critical positions open, creates discontinuity and hampers the government in emergency response situations.
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Give peace a chance — Utah Catholic remembers his boyhood walks up ‘Abbey Road’

By Peggy Fletcher Stack
  • (Steve Griffin | The Salt Lake Tribune) Monks walk back to the monastery at the Abbey of Our Lady of the Holy Trinity in Huntsville after funeral services for Brother Felix in 2010.
  • “I started in a wonderful place with my church, my religion and these men but then struggled with the abuse scandal and the cover-up,” says O’Brien, who often represents The Salt Lake Tribune in legal matters.
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Ohio primary fight revives Democratic hostilities suppressed in Trump era

By David Smith in Cleveland, Ohio
  • Turner goes head-to-head on Tuesday with Shontel Brown in a primary in Ohio’s 11th congressional district that is being watched closely by Democrats across the nation.
  • The Democratic Majority for Israel political action committee has funded attack ads against Turner – who in May tweeted “Palestinian lives matter” – reminding viewers of her remark last year that voting for Biden instead of Trump was like eating half a bowl of shit instead of a full one.
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Zoom settles consumer claims over privacy for $85 Million

By Bloomberg
By Peter Blumberg | Bloomberg Proposed accord resolves claims Zoom Video Communications Inc. misled consumers about encryption security, improperly shared data with Facebook Inc. and failed to protect private meetings from being disrupted by hacking attacks known as “zoombombings,” according to a court filing. Settlement will pay up to $25 to paid Zoom subscribers covered by the class action litigation and up to $15 to individuals who aren’t eligible to submit a paid subscription claim. Accord also requires Zoom to improve its privacy practices. Settlement requires approval by U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh in San Jose, California. Related […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Credit Suisse Bet So Much on Archegos for So Little

By Timothy L O'Brien, Chris Hughes
  • As the report by Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP, a law firm hired by the bank to examine the Archegos debacle, lays out, none of the hedge fund’s senior bankers at Credit Suisse seemed particularly alarmed when Archegos’s portfolio ballooned earlier this year.
  • On Feb. 9, a director monitoring hedge-fund hazards told the risk officers directly responsible for keeping tabs on Archegos that the fund needed to post $1 billion in fresh collateral after its trading positions triggered potential loss alerts.
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OPINION | REX NELSON: A plan for Arkansas

By Rex Nelson
  • He could use the think tank to produce an economic development strategy for Arkansas, the kind of in-depth report that other small states could never afford.
  • After being named by Gov. Asa Hutchinson in April 2020 to head a statewide task force for economic recovery, Steuart Walton of Bentonville quickly determined that the 35-member group could be more than just a vehicle to steer the state through the pandemic.
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Olympics: Marcell Jacobs becomes the new 100m king with glory for Italy

By Sean Ingle at Tokyo Olympic Stadium
  • Silver for Fred Kerley and bronze for Andre De Grasse
  • Britain’s Zharnel Hughes disqualified after false start

The Italian sprinter Marcell Jacobs caused a major sensation in the men’s Olympic 100m final by storming to his country’s first ever gold medal in the event.

On an evening of pulsating drama the 26-year-old, a former long jumper, powered clear in the last 30m to win in 9.80sec. The American Fred Kerley was second in 9.84s while Canada’s Andre De Grasse flew home in 9.89s to take bronze.

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Retired neurologist with Alzheimer’s knows firsthand the risks of Aduhelm

By Jonathan Saltzman — Boston Globe
  • What’s not in dispute is this: About 40 percent of patients who received the highest dose in two late-stage trials later showed abnormalities on MRI scans, irregularities that indicated brain swelling or tiny hemorrhages.
  • D aniel Gibbs had received only four monthly doses of Biogen’s experimental Alzheimer’s drug in a clinical trial in 2017 when he ended up in an intensive care unit.
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Sunday Bulletin Board: Cleaning the farmhouse for company (spiders!) takes her back four decades, to a reading of ‘Charlotte’s Web.’

By Bulletin Board
  • In those, our ‘beans and weenies years,’ he worked a full day for his employer, raced home to a hurried family dinner, and then descended to the basement, where he saw his own clients until 10 o’clock or so.
  • If you have not yet read “Charlotte’s Web,” we advise you to skip to the next item, finish today’s Bulletin Board, and then go read “Charlotte’s Web”; you can save DEBK’s story for later!] — the closing day of the county fair, when Charlotte explains to Wilbur that she will not be accompanying him back to the Zuckerman farm, that she will die.
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Leonard Pitts: Don’t endanger the lives of the many to humor the misconceptions of the few

By Leonard Pitts | The Miami Herald
  • That’s the most frustrating thing about the most recent announcement from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that even those who are fully vaccinated against the disease should return to wearing masks indoors in cities that are COVID-19 hot spots.
  • And blame, too, those people who refused to wear masks or be vaccinated, and the public officials who seconded them.
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Lies, secrets and ‘The Nutcracker’: Megan Abbott’s suspense novel plumbs the dark side of dance

By Suzanne Berne
  • “The Turnout” follows the story of two sisters, Dara and Marie, who run the successful Durant School of Dance, which they inherited from their exacting mother, Madame Durant.
  • And each year, just as their mother had done, they stage a highly anticipated production of “The Nutcracker” that turns little girls into scheming monsters — everyone wants to be Clara — but keeps the school financially en pointe.
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Letter: Gondola vs. buses in Little Cottonwood Canyon? There is a third option.

By Mark Holt | The Public Forum
  • UDOT recently issued a Draft EIS, which proposes two “preferred alternatives” for increasing the number of people who can access Snowbird and Alta ski areas in Little Cottonwood Canyon.
  • The “gondola” being proposed for Little Cottonwood Canyon has cabins which hold 35 people each and is shown with two fixed “track” cables to support the cabin weight and a third moving cable to drag the cabins up the track cables.
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Letter: Enough is enough: Please either get vaccinated, or sit on the sidelines

By Ira Rubinfeld | The Public Forum
Dear unvaccinated adults (and those not allowing their children over 12 to be vaccinated): It has now been seven months since COVID vaccines have been available. With the Delta variant now raging, your freedom to choose not to be vaccinated is now impinging on the rest of our freedoms to go to movies, restaurants, family gatherings, concerts, sporting events and countless other activities without fear of getting infected.If you want the freedom to stay unvaccinated, then you should pay the price of being excluded from entering these types of events, from riding public transportation, or participating in any other activity where you can […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Conservation and curb appeal: Striking a balance with water-wise gardening

By Caroleine James
  • Rock gardens increase the temperature of your yard, raise cooling costs in the home and put stress on nearby plants, explained Kelly Kopp,a professor at Utah State University who researches landscape water conservation.
  • Since so much of residential water use goes to landscaping, “things will need to change if we’re going to continue to have this city in the desert,” Kollmann said.
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Letter: Donald Trump and Charles Koch are dangerous enemies of democracy

By Ron Molen | The Public Forum
  • Once secretive, Koch’s empire has now been revealed in his new book, “Believe in People,” in which he brags that his syndicate has: “seven hundred of America’s most successful business leaders,” “over one thousand professors at three hundred universities and other post-secondary organizations,” “tens of thousands of K-12 teachers and educators,” and “millions of grassroots policy advocates in all fifty states.”
  • And Koch wants to shrink democracy and eliminate government regulations that make the nation safer and healthier.
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Robert Azzi: Trust in the children

  • Children should indeed be taught that while many abolitionists rose from their pews to oppose enslavement of human beings many other people of faith used, and many continue to use, as witnessed in the insurrection at the Capitol on January 6, scripture to support the sins of white racism, white supremacy and white privilege.
  • Today, the perceived threat to white supremacy is believed to be Critical Race Theory.
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Biden cannot sit back and let our democracy sink. He’s now showing us he gets that.

By E.J. Dionne
  • Reflecting a view widely held by civil rights leaders, Jones argued that Biden must match the energy he devoted to infrastructure with an equally spirited push on voting rights, including — if needed — a willingness to back a change in Senate rules.
  • Thus the importance of Friday’s White House meeting, in which Biden joined House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Majority Leader Charles E.
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Down the drain: As the water level hits a record low, what will become of the Great Salt Lake?

By Sean P. Means
  • (Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Birds decompose on the expanding shore of the Great Salt Lake on Saturday, July 10, 2021, as extreme drought conditions recede the water line to an unprecedented level.
  • “It’s like pouring water onto a plate,” said Lynn de Freitas, executive director of the advocacy group Friends of Great Salt Lake .
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Utah lawmakers won’t lead so they should get out of the way, Editorial Board writes

By The Salt Lake Tribune Editorial Board
  • People who know what they are doing — people who run county health departments, school districts, hospitals and city halls around Utah — should be allowed to make their own informed decisions about requiring masks for all who work in or enter schools, other public buildings or places of business.
  • But ill-advised actions by the Utah Legislature banning mask mandates and prohibiting the use of state money for vaccine incentives has unreasonably tied the hands of the governor, the state Health Department, mayors, school boards and county health directors.
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Bella Vista — Briefly

By NWA DemocrAt-GAzette
  • BELLA VISTA -- The Aug. 14 offering of the United Lutheran Church (100 Cooper Road, Bella Vista) Annual Village International Food Festival is Italian cuisine.
  • BELLA VISTA -- Members of the Bella Vista Police Department are preparing for the annual National Night Out from 5-8 p.m. Tuesday at Kingsdale Pavilion outside Riordan Hall.
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Suni Lee wins bronze medal in uneven bars

By Oriana Gonzalez
U.S. gymnast Sunisa "Suni" Lee won her 3rd Olympic medal on Sunday, taking home bronze in the individual uneven bars event.Driving the news: Also on Sunday, U.S. gymnast MyKayla Skinner won the silver medal in the vault on Sunday after stepping in for Simone Biles, who withdrew from the event to prioritize her mental health and well-being. Lee, who is 18 years old, is the first Hmong American to compete in the Olympics and is also the first Asian American to earn gold in the gymnastics individual all-around. Nina Derwael of Belgium won gold in the uneven bars and Anastasia Ilyankova of Russia won silver. What to watch: Lee will […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Good news for gender equality as court green lights Meland v. Padilla

By Christina Sandefur
  • One California law unconstitutionally forces people to make decisions on the basis of sex, patronizes women by disregarding their individual preferences, and makes it harder for everyone to succeed in the workplace.
  • Enacted in 2018, SB 826 requires all publicly traded companies incorporated or even just headquartered in California to have at least one female board member, a quota that increases depending on the board’s size.
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Sunisa Lee holds on for bronze medal on uneven bars

By Dane Mizutani
St. Paul teen Sunisa Lee has completed her Olympic collection. After winning the gold medal in the all-around competition, andthe silver medal in the team competition, the 18-year-old Lee held on for the bronze medal in the uneven bars on Sunday morning at Ariake Gymnastics Centre. It wasn’t the best routine for Lee on this particular day as she broke a couple of connections on her way to a score of 14.500. She scored much higher on the apparatus in the all-around competition (15.300) and the team competition (15.400). That said, the fact that Lee broke a couple of connections and still found her way onto the podium speaks to her […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Letter: More protections for dogs and their owners

  • The article, “Law changes help wild critters, cats, and canines” ( Monitor, 7/28) cites a new law making the malicious removal of a tracking collar or microchip from another’s dog a crime and augments NH RSA 466:42a which prohibits removing the collar or stealing a licensed and collared dog.
  • First, license and collar your dog as these protective laws often contain the phrase, “licensed and collared dog.”
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Fayetteville attorney named new chief lawyer for USDA

By Frank E. Lockwood
  • "The general counsel at USDA must be someone who can be relied upon by Congress and the agriculture community to provide sound, practical, and candid legal guidance to the department," Boozman said in a written statement Friday evening.
  • The U.S. Senate confirmed the nomination late Friday of Janie Simms Hipp to serve as general counsel of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
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Jury trial for Franklin County sheriff to begin Monday

By Thomas Saccente
  • However, Christopher Brockett, attorney for Franklin County, said the county Quorum Court voted in April to end the accommodation authorizing county employees to deliver checks to Boen.
  • The Quorum Court also established May 1 as the start of a 90-day period after which it can vote to turn the possibility of removing Boen to Jeff Phillips, Franklin County's prosecuting attorney, Brockett said.
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SEFCU, CAP COM merger would create one of state’s largest credit unions

By Rick Karlin

The proposed merger of SEFCU and CAP COM would, at $8 billion, place the combined organization in the nation’s Top 30 credit unions and one of the top five in New York State. It also would be one of the Capital Region’s largest locally-based financial institutions, including commercial banks.But the merger is about more than the simple “day-to-day, hand-to-hand combat,” that credit unions and commercial banks wage with one another as they compete for customers, said Michael Castellana, President and CEO of SEFCU. It's about competing with technology.

[…]Read more >Similar articles >
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Expert says ‘the problem remains with the unvaccinated’ as COVID-19 cases surge in the US

  • At that time, more than 163 million people in the U.S. were fully vaccinated against COVID-19.Wen clarified that the federal government's recent guidance that fully vaccinated people should mask up is not an indication that the vaccines aren't working."So the CDC should actually be saying, 'Look, the reason we're doing indoor mandates is because the unvaccinated cannot be trusted to put on masks.
  • And some in the medical community are calling for more stringent requirements regarding vaccinations for health care and long-term care employees.Nationally, less than 59% of nursing home staff are vaccinated against COVID-19, according to data released Friday from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.
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Vaccine Refusers Don’t Want Blue America’s Respect

By Brooke Harrington
  • They want to save face within the very specific set of social ties that sociologists call “ reference groups ”—the neighborhoods, churches, workplaces, and friendship networks that help people obtain the income, information, companionship, mutual aid, and other resources they need to live.
  • Many of the people refusing safe, effective vaccination amid a deadly pandemic are enmeshed in a very distinctive type of relationship that sociologists have been studying for more than 70 years: the con job.
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What’s different about the Delta variant? Here’s what’s known

  • "Therefore, more breakthrough and more community spread despite vaccination."The World Health Organization has been reassuring so far."In terms of just looking at the prevention of severe disease and hospitalization, they're all very good, over 90% effective," Dr. Soumya Swaminathan, WHO's chief scientist said in a briefing this month.
  • For instance, New York University infectious disease specialist Dr. Celine Gounder created a stir when she said people could be infected by Delta in just one second of exposure, compared to 15 minutes at the beginning of the pandemic.This wasn't based on scientific observations.
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Parents, teachers are nervous for the start of the new school year as the pandemic escalates in Hawaii

By Timothy Hurley
  • While she’s concerned about her own safety and the lack of proper distancing possible with full classes at the state’s largest high school, she’s more worried about her 6-year-old daughter, Gianna, who will be starting first grade at Ewa Elementary School.
  • Supported by scientific research, federal mandates, guidance by state health officials and its own frustrating experience during the opening phases of the COVID-19 pandemic, the state Department of Education has been planning for months to minimize the remote and hybrid learning models employed much of last year in favor of full, in-classroom learning.
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Letters: Clearly, there is a lot we can learn from Simone Biles

By Letter Writers
  • That type of selfless thinking was on display when thousands of young men and women volunteered for military service after December 7,1941, and Pearl Harbor … not because they necesarily wanted to be soldiers, but because their country needed them, an act for the greater good.
  • I just read a nicely written, well thought-out letter to the editor concerning Covid 19 and how he thinks the media shape the public’s response to it (“Spare me the condescending narratives about how I’m too stupid to manage my own life,” July 29).
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Dr. Greg Sharp

By Kimberly Dishongh
  • Sharp set out to become a family practitioner in his small hometown -- just like Dr. C.E. Ripley, that physician he admired -- but he modified his plans after walking into Arkansas Children's Hospital for the first time as a medical student in 1987.
  • "When I went to the doctor's office, I just thought things were cool there, like for instance you cut yourself and you go there and you sit there and watch the doctor stick you, numb up your finger and stitch it up, remove a wart or you know just common things that kids have done," says Sharp, "I wanted to do that." He grew up in Crossett, a rambunctious, accident-prone kid who fractured so many bones his mother worried for a time that he might have brittle bone disease.
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More virus path to burnout

By Lara Farrar
  • On the front lines of one of the deadliest global crises in history, health care workers liken the latest wave of covid-19 washing over Arkansas to a slow-motion tsunami or a never-ending horror film where the villain is seemingly defeated, yet somehow keeps returning in scene after scene while doctors and nurses are captive audience members who have no choice but to watch as the horror continues to unfold.
  • Baptist Health Medical Center and UAMS recently allowed the Democrat-Gazette access to the hospitals' covid-19 units where doctors and nurses detailed what it's like for them now to be going through another surge.
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Va. General Assembly convening at Capitol for first time since pandemic started

By Laura Vozzella
  • But the judicial makeover is giving Republicans “heartburn” given that Democrats will have complete control over the process, said Del. Rob Bell (R-Albemarle), a member of the House Courts of Justice Committee.
  • Legislators meeting in a scheduled two-week special session have just two tasks on their to-do list, both highly consequential: allocating $4.3 billion in federal coronavirus relief funds and appointing a slew of judges to the state’s second-highest court.
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In the waves, a power greater than ourselves

By Thad Ziolkowski
  • Then again, the neurochemical signature of learning to surf is essentially that of acquiring an addiction, the main elements of which are novelty, risk and intensity.
  • The infrequency and ephemerality of good waves, especially on the East Coast, breed tension and anxiety, a surf-specific sort of FOMO (though surfers will tell you they invented the fear of missing out).
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8 things to know before you visit Canada

By Rebekah F. Ward, Claire Bryan
  • Vaccinated Americans will need to do two important things before leaving for Canada: take one pre-departure COVID-19 test from a U.S.-based provider, and fill out a travel questionnaire on Canada’s new ArriveCAN app, available for download on smartphones or to view as a webpage on most internet browsers.
  • Greyhound buses aren’t running to Canada either, and Amanda Miles said the company will likely delay until after Aug. 9, “given the uncertainty of when the U.S. border will open for Canadian citizens” along with added travel requirements.
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Second Opinion: What China’s dangerous coal relapse means for the rest of the world

By Daniel K. Gardner
  • A Global Energy Monitor report concludes that if China continues to expand capacity to 1,400 gigawatts through 2035, as proposed, “its coal-power generation alone will be more than three times as large as the global limit on coal power use determined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to keep global warming well below 2 degrees C.”
  • Climate experts at Global Energy Monitor, TransitionZero and elsewhere calculate that limiting global warming to below 2 degrees Celsius will require China to close 600 of its 1,082 coal plants by 2030 .
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Variant’s threat poses dilemma for U.S. parents

  • Dr. Katherine Williamson, a pediatrician in Orange County, said she has seen an increase in coronavirus cases among young patients in recent weeks, as well as an uptick in parents who are vaccinating eligible children -- both of which she attributed to the rise of the delta variant.
  • The rise of the delta variant has spurred a rash of changes in recent weeks, from new testing and vaccination requirements for federal, city and state employees to the revival of previously abandoned mask guidelines.
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Readers and Writers: Catching up with 5 Minnesota authors and 6 new reads

By Mary Ann Grossmann
  • Surrounded by friends that have been with her in every book, Lorraine tries to trap the guy who paid the farmhands to hurt Ricky, sits by her father’s bedside, and tries to handle her strong-willed mother, who gets kicked out of the hospital several times.
  • What’s especially helpful is that Engstrom gives specific information about whatever she needed to know at each stage of caring for husband and in her later grief, rather than putting it all at the end of the book.
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Beyond translation: Beloved Latin Mass to linger on at Toledo’s St. Joseph

More than a half-century after Pope Paul VI turned his priests around in 1970, the Rev. David Kidd is still facing the altar at St. Joseph Parish in Toledo's Vistula neighborhood. He's still wearing a maniple draped over his left arm, and a biretta on top of his head; his servers are still swinging censers, and his parishioners are translating his chants in their missals. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Column: Hawaii public schools are ready to safely resume in-person learning

  • When federal education officials in April began clearing the way for the nation’s schools to begin reopening after more than a year of disrupted learning, U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona rightly proclaimed: “There is simply no substitute for in-person learning.”
  • It’s time to get back to in-person learning, and our educators are eager and ready to welcome students back this week.
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Editorial: Vaccine mandate may be required

  • President Joe Biden last week set the tone by announcing plans to require all federal workers either to get the COVID-19 vaccine or to undergo testing for the virus on a regular basis.
  • Adding to the worries: Although the risk of infection for fully vaccinated people is lower, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last week related findings that if they are infected, they can transmit the virus just as the unvaccinated do.
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Washington news in brief

By Frank E. Lockwood
  • WASHINGTON -- The White House announced Friday that Rabbi Sharon Kleinbaum of New York City and attorney Khizr Khan of Charlottesville, Va., would be joining the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom.
  • The Congressional Oversight Commission issued its 15th report Friday, providing an update on "implementation of Division A, Title IV, Subtitle A of the CARES Act" by the Treasury Department and the Federal Reserve.
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Investors Are Betting Price Pressures Will Ease

  • Investors are betting the inflationary streak that has sent prices of everything from used cars to lumber soaring will fade in the coming years, a reassuring sign for markets struggling to find direction.
  • Since peaking for the year in May, the break-even rates for five-, seven-, and 10-year Treasurys have all fallen—suggesting traders are pricing in a moderation in inflation in coming years.
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Narragansett Brewery a perfect escape in nearby Providence

By Moira McCarthy
  • The newly opened Narragansett Brewery in the eclectic Fox Point section of Providence is a quick success, marrying the history of the brand and the passion of smart, modern brewers in a spot that’s breezy, bright and just plain fun; a locale where you can savor the new while celebrating the classic.
  • Now, the Brewery is the next step in giving beer lovers a place to savor the classic and the creatively new.
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Jamelle Bouie: Attack on voting rights is partisan. So the response must be, too.

By Jamelle Bouie
  • The Enforcement Acts of 1870 and 1871 — the first of which was an early voting rights bill (forbidding state officials from discriminating among voters on the basis of race) and the second of which gave the federal government the tools needed to prosecute the Ku Klux Klan — were also passed over unified Democratic opposition.
  • The Civil Rights Act of 1875, which banned discrimination in many public accommodations, was similarly partisan — passed against unanimous Democratic opposition — and the Federal Elections Bill of 1890, a last-ditch effort to protect what was left of Black voting rights in the South, fell to a Democratic filibuster in the Senate.
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Firing of Fort Smith officer over accident report stands

By Thomas Saccente
  • Coder was fired April 13 after not stepping forward regarding the falsification of a report in which he was involved, according to documents, and audio and video files the Police Department released in May related to the investigation into the matter.
  • Hendricks wrote in her March 1 complaint to Baker that Little called her Feb. 12 after the police operation and told her they were going to complete the accident report the next week because Coder "has a lot going on and has some stuff he might be in trouble for," and Little didn't want "to put that on him right now."
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Burglaries

By Amy Buckholtz, Joy Jackson, Justin Cunningham, Tonya Lee
The following burglaries are from reports collected from the Little Rock and North Little Rock police departments. The names listed are of people who reported a burglary, and the dates are when the crime is believed to have taken place. Cammack Village data are not included. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Pet of the Week

Little Bit is a 1-year-old, long-haired, tuxedo cat. She loves to play with her feather wand and toys. Little Bit loves to purr when you pet her and is the ultimate lap cat. She is shy at first, but she is full of joy once she's comfortable. Little Bit would love a home where she can get lots of love and attention, and will make the perfect, loyal companion for someone. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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North Little Rock notebook

By Neal Earley
  • The festival, set to take place in September, will require attendees to provide proof of vaccination, which includes showing "an original vaccination card, a digital copy, or a photograph of one's Covid-19 vaccination record."
  • Argenta Community Theater will require audience members to show proof of vaccination to attend performances of "Pippin."
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Penn State expanded its branch campuses decades ago. Now, some say that’s one reason state universities are struggling.

  • Jones said Penn State has added bachelor’s programs to its Commonwealth campuses in areas where there was student demand and labor needs, most recently in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, the so-called STEM fields, where there is little program overlap with PASSHE schools.
  • Pennsylvania State University shook the state’s already crowded higher-education marketplace in the late 1990s when it added bachelor’s degree programs to its branch campuses, effectively turning what were for many stops on the way to State College into four-year universities.
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Arkansas Achievers

  • This joint award is given to people who reflect the University of Arkansas' commitment to academics and diversity.
  • • Shylee Head of Mena has been awarded the first Foresters for the Future Scholarship as announced by the Arkansas Department of Agriculture's Forestry Division and the University of Arkansas at Monticello.
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Education notebook

By Cynthia Howell
  • Gilbert, a debate coach and communications teacher at Central High -- as well as the Little Rock School District's current Teacher of the Year -- assumes the presidency of the Little Rock Education Association this month.
  • Teresa Knapp Gordon, has completed four years as the elected president of the Little Rock Education Association.
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Panel to explore ways to issue 2 pot permits

By Rachel Herzog
  • After deciding last month that it will issue the remaining two dispensary licenses allowed under the state constitution, the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Commission this week will look at how those license recipients could be selected.
  • Miller, who lives in Bryant, said he would be in favor of issuing the remaining licenses because there are fewer dispensaries in that area than in other parts of the state.
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The captains step aside and let the team take over in ‘Buddy vs. Duff: Baker Battle’

By George Dickie
  • “Those guys are so talented on both sides they don’t need me and Duff to be there to hold their hands,” Valastro, owner of Carlo’s Bakery in Hoboken, N.J., said.
  • Airing consecutive Sundays starting Aug. 1 on Food Network (and also streaming on discovery+), the hourlong competition specials find Valastro and Goldman kicked out of their bakeries by their own teams, who then go head to head in baking challenges to determine which team is best as their captains look on virtually.
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New USDA chief lawyer an Arkansan

By Frank E. Lockwood
  • "The general counsel at USDA must be someone who can be relied upon by Congress and the agriculture community to provide sound, practical, and candid legal guidance to the department," Boozman said in a written statement Friday evening.
  • The U.S. Senate confirmed the nomination late Friday of Janie Simms Hipp to serve as general counsel of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
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Other days

By The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette
  • After Sheriff Thornton had damaged his hand on Staub's head, the taxpayer had a change of heart and returned to the courthouse and paid the amount due.
  • Staub claimed to have paid his personal taxes, and when an examination of Sheriff Thornton's books showed the man was wrong, Staub used the offensive term.
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Labels on detainees in rioting dismissed

By Frank E. Lockwood
  • Americans detained for their role in the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol aren't "political prisoners" as some of his colleagues are claiming, U.S. Rep. Rick Crawford, R-Ark., said last week.
  • Crawford was the only member of the Arkansas congressional delegation who agreed last week to discuss Tuesday's committee hearing and the subsequent news conference by the Republican lawmakers at the Justice Department.
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Literary pick of the week: Authors Power and Stark virtually launch new books

By Mary Ann Grossmann
Susan Power and Chris Stark, both of whom have Native American ancestry, will virtually launch their new books at 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 4, presented by East Side Freedom Library. Power, an enrolled member of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, is the author of three previous books of fiction including “The Grass Dancer,” which was awarded the PEN/Hemingway Prize, as well as “Sacred Wilderness” and “Roofwalker.” Her new novel, “A Council of Dolls,” tells the story of three generations of Yanktonai Dakota women and their dolls, allies manifested during times of great challenge, highlighting how generational trauma develops and persists, especially […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Still delighting in each other’s company after 66 years

  • After a few years, he wanted to spend more time at home with Gwen and became regional director for the American Friends of Hebrew University in Jerusalem.
  • To photograph and write his second book, Reconciling Lives, Al spent a year with a group of young volunteers as they worked at sites around the world for Action Reconciliation — Service for Peace, an organization founded in Germany whose volunteers participate in educational, historical, political, and social projects in 13 countries damaged by the Nazi regime.
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US launches emergency airlift to rescue Afghan allies at risk of Taliban’s revenge

By Emma Graham-Harrison
  • America has launched emergency airlifts for Afghans who worked with its armed forces and diplomats, evacuating hundreds who are still waiting for their visas to the United States on military flights.
  • Tens of thousands of Afghans with a US connection are waiting for a response to their visa applications, including more than 18,000 who worked for the military or embassy, and in excess of 50,000 family members eligible to travel with them.
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When moral pieties get in the way of doing the right thing, children suffer | Sonia Sodha

By Sonia Sodha
  • How, then, did Lambeth council in south London get itself into a position where members and senior managers, at best, looked the other way while children in its care were subject to the most depraved sexual, physical and emotional abuse and, at worst, were complicit?
  • Lambeth council threw open the doors of one children’s home to any volunteer expressing an interest in spending time with children, without running any checks – a “potential licence for child sexual abuse”, the report said.
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Dr. Gregory Baker Sharp

By Kimberly Dishongh
  • Sharp set out to become a family practitioner in his small hometown -- just like Dr. C.E. Ripley, that physician he admired -- but he modified his plans after walking into Arkansas Children's Hospital for the first time as a medical student in 1987.
  • "When I went to the doctor's office, I just thought things were cool there, like for instance you cut yourself and you go there and you sit there and watch the doctor stick you, numb up your finger and stitch it up, remove a wart or you know just common things that kids have done," says Sharp, "I wanted to do that." He grew up in Crossett, a rambunctious, accident-prone kid who fractured so many bones his mother worried for a time that he might have brittle bone disease.
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Mills earns praise, criticism for pandemic response as re-election campaign looms

By Scott Thistle
  • Still, the Democratic governor is earning praise for her work, mixed with some criticism from Republicans, and appears to be well positioned for a re-election campaign that may turn on her handling of the pandemic.
  • Dunphy also said she was disappointed in a number of Mills’ vetoes, as was Senate President Troy Jackson, D-Allagash, who saw Mills veto a number of bills he has worked for years to get through the Legislature.
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Schubert Club announces 2021-22 Accordo and Schubert Club Mix seasons

  • After a full season of virtual performances, Accordo, a collective of present and former principal players of the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra and Minnesota Orchestra, will return to Westminster Hall at Westminster Presbyterian Church in Minneapolis for their four Monday evening performances this year.
  • Schubert Club Mix, now entering its ninth season, is a series that “aims to take the formality out of classical music by presenting intimate performances with artists who are influencing the musical landscape.”
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Tunisia shows that democracy will struggle if it can’t deliver prosperity

By Simon Tisdall
  • I mplicit in US and western support for pro-democracy movements and transitions around the world is an assumption that, given a free choice, a system of elected, representative government is what people will always naturally prefer.
  • I think that’s what all the people want,” he told the Guardian after last week’s surprise move by Kais Saied, Tunisia’s president, to seize power and impose a state of emergency .
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The Pages by Hugo Hamilton review – a book with a story to tell

By Colm Tóibín

A novel smuggled out of Nazi Germany narrates this ingenious work which warns of the danger in ignoring lessons of history

Towards the end of Hugo Hamilton’s ingenious and engaging novel The Pages, a book club in Berlin devotes its attention to Joseph Roth’s novel Rebellion, first published in 1924, until the members become more interested in discussing restaurants. Suddenly, a voice enters the narrative: “What is this, a foodie club?”

The voice belongs to a copy of the actual book Rebellion. Its individual tone has been so well established by now that we have been longing for it to intervene. Indeed, every time this book, this character, in tones both self-deprecating and wise, lets us know what it sees and feels and remembers, it enhances our sense of its quirky and necessary presence.

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USA’s Xander Schauffele holds on to capture Olympic men’s golf title

By Agencies
  • Schauffele captures Olympic gold medal in tense finish
  • Sabbatini’s final-round 61 propels him to silver medal
  • McIlroy, Matsuyama into seven-man playoff for bronze

American Xander Schauffele won the Olympic gold medal at Kasumigaseki Country Club as Paul Casey and Rory McIlroy entered a seven-way play-off for the bronze medal.

Schauffele withstood an Olympic-record final round of 61 from South Africa-born Rory Sabbatini, who now represents Slovakia, to triumph by one shot on 18 under par, with Sabbatini finishing second.

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UAM student receives scholarship in forestry

By Special to The Commercial
  • "We're very pleased that this scholarship helps provide financial assistance to students like Shylee, who have demonstrated a great work ethic and a passion for studying and having a career in forestry," said Michael Blazier, dean of the UAM College of Forestry, Agriculture, and Natural Resources.
  • The scholarship provides $4,000 per semester, for four years, to an incoming freshman pursuing a forestry degree at UAM's College of Forestry, Agriculture, and Natural Resources.
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Brexit’s Feared Diplomatic Crises Have Begun

By Max Hastings
  • The Brexit treaty signed by Johnson’s government kept open the border between the Republic of Ireland to the south — still an enthusiastic EU member — and Northern Ireland by agreeing to enforce customs checks on goods that move across the Irish Sea to and from the U.K. mainland.
  • A Gibraltar settlement was postponed in the 2019 Brexit treaty negotiations, but the European Commission in Brussels is proposing a new deal, whereby the Rock and Spain would enjoy a customs union and friction-free border, under EU rules.
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Littwin: As I take my mask out of storage, I have many COVID-related questions. Like, why do so many ignore the best answers?

By Mike Littwin
  • On the same day Biden announced his workaround plan, Polis announced that 30,000 state employees must either be vaccinated or take twice-weekly COVID tests and also wear masks.
  • Among the changes that require new thinking is the discovery — you see, scientific knowledge and viruses can both mutate — that even the vaccinated can still contract the delta virus and, worse, apparently pass along a heavy viral load to the many unvaccinated.
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Familiar Faces: Geena Davis and Wendy Guerrero chat about the Bentonville Film Festival

By Jocelyn Murphy
  • "I think that is really exciting that we are offering inclusion in that way," affirms Wendy Guerrero, president of the festival and the newly formed nonprofit Bentonville Film Foundation.
  • As the Bentonville Film Festival returns to Northwest Arkansas Monday through Aug. 8, festival organizers are looking forward to welcoming audiences back to celebrating the magic of the movies and the power of storytelling.
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A sudden unsettling turn for the worse

By Karen Martin
  • The urgent-care staff members gave us directions to a nearby hospital in Sherwood: "It's small, and you probably won't have to wait too long." We entered, consulted with a triage nurse, then took seats in the ER waiting room occupied by about 10 others.
  • We grabbed a couple of books to keep us busy if necessary while waiting, gave the dogs some rawhide chews, and headed to the closest facility we could find, which required calling from outside its door to deliver a load of information.
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The rocky road between truth and lies

By Karen Martin
  • When distorted or incomplete messages that come from mass and social media are repeated in normal talk, they may become "true" for the purposes of that conversation.
  • While "lies" may seem outrageous--global warming is a lie that liberals tell in order to change the way we live and take away our rights; Trump won the 2020 election; there are nanochips in the covid vaccine so that the government can track our every movement--people believe them and may act in accord with them, such as refusing to be vaccinated against covid.
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EDITORIAL: This one is special

  • To underscore how serious things are in Arkansas, the governor also said he would ask other states to send health-care workers here to help out at hospitals, which are understaffed for the number of patients therein.
  • "And right now we have a prohibition that's enacted by statute, which is Act 1002, that prohibits the local school districts from making local decisions on what they should do, public-health wise, in their school system," the governor said.
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Coach a Child – Prattville YMCA

By Janae Smith
Coach a Child is a program provided by the Prattville YMCA. They provide the community with access to vital programs and resources that support youth development, healthy living and social responsibility. Financial assistance is available for these programs as well as child care and proper activity that promotes a heathier lifestyle. Coach a Child needs donations to their Scholarship Fund to be able to help more families participate. > Donate Directly HERE < READ MORE ABOUT COACH A CHILD AND YMCA Categories: 3 Degree Guarantee […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Letters

  • I almost laughed at the "reasoning" Sarah Huckabee Sanders used in her recent guest column to explain why she got a "Trump Operation Warp Speed" covid vaccination.
  • It amazes me that there are a few people left in Arkansas like Mr. John Barton who apparently does not realize that if a politically elected Democrat's mouth is moving, they are lying.
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Lay Epidemiology and Vaccine Acceptance

By Nuti SV, Armstrong K.
  • From the lay epidemiologic perspective, it makes sense that groups with clear evidence of experiencing worse outcomes from most aspects of the US health care system should be skeptical of the information about the average risks and benefits of vaccination.
  • 4 Lay epidemiology is how inferences are drawn from patterns of disease in small groups like friends and family, larger groups from social media or other sources, and even entire populations from public information or news stories.
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Health processionals expect cases to rise ahead of start of school

  • We're not gonna stop teaching," Yarbor said.In-person learning also allows children to interact with teachers and other children their age."I'm ready to go back to school so I can learn new stuff that I didn't know about," Akilla James Jr. said.The celebrating out scholars back to school event at the VA Legion Park has enough supplies to service approximately 2,000 students.They provided students with hand sanitizer, masks and school supplies.
  • And these are going to lead to disruption of in-person learning," said Dr. Todd Byers, Mississippi epidemiologist.The quality of learning is important for children which is a big reason why the state is feeling pressure to open with in-person learning.One woman brought her nieces to the city of Jackson's back-to-school drive to get supplies.
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Republicans will defend their Caesar but new revelations show Trump’s true threat | Lloyd Green

By Lloyd Green
  • A few hours later, the DoJ’s Office of Legal Counsel (OLC), its policy-setting arm, once led by Bill Barr, Trump’s second attorney general, opined that Trump’s tax returns could no longer be kept from the House ways and means committee.
  • First, on Friday morning, news broke that the justice department had provided Congress with copies of notes of a damning 27 December 2020 conversation between Trump, Jeffrey Rosen, then acting attorney general, and Richard Donoghue, Rosen’s deputy.
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