Sep 20, 2021

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USC Gould alum joins expanding Office for Equity, Equal Opportunity and Title IX

By USC News
  • A year ago, in response to changes in Title IX federal regulations, the university updated its policies and procedures to ensure timely, fair responses to reports of harassment and discrimination based on protected characteristics -- including sexual harassment -- involving USC students, faculty, staff and visitors and has committed significant resources to support effective education about and implementation of these new policies and procedures.
  • "Linda brings a deep knowledge of civil rights law and policy, employment law and regulatory practices to this important work and is very experienced in the California higher education setting," said Felicia Washington, who oversees the EEO-TIX office as the senior vice president of human resources, equity and compliance.
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New USC center focuses on issues affecting Latinx communities

By USC News
  • He is now applying his research expertise and intimate knowledge of California's Latina and Latino communities to his new role as director of the Latinx and Latin American Studies Center at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.
  • De Lara says he hopes the center will become a place where community members, academics and students can "celebrate the diverse Latinx community" and engage in research projects that pertain to issues affecting Latinx communities.
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USC’s small business program helps local restaurateur turn misfortune into growth

By USC News
  • For more than 45 years, the Dulan family has owned and operated several restaurants in South Los Angeles and the South Bay. Adolf and Mary Dulan provided the foundation for the family business, opening a chain of hamburger stands in the Crenshaw neighborhood of South L.A.
  • "At the time, we were in the middle of COVID and a lot of the businesses in the program were struggling -- myself included," Dulan said.
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UK psychiatry chief urges funds to tackle mental health backlog

By Andrew Gregory and Kevin Rawlinson
  • Extra cash is now urgently needed to help a further 1.6 million people who are waiting for mental health treatment as more continue to come forward seeking help after a year of lockdowns, James said.
  • About 1.5 million people received NHS mental health support in June and many more are in desperate need of treatment, said Dr Adrian James, Britain’s most senior psychiatrist.
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Secure human attachment can promote support for climate change mitigation

By mdbownds@wisc.edu (Deric Bownds)
  • With this research, we show that priming attachment security influences how much people care about and accept climate change via an increased empathy for humanity.
  • Next, we demonstrate that priming attachment security, compared to a standard National Geographic video about climate change, increases monetary donations to a proenvironmental group in politically moderate and conservative individuals (Study 3: n = 196).
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Most NHS staff vote to oppose 3% pay rise as union warns workers ‘fed up’

By Andrew Gregory Health editor
  • NHS staff have voted overwhelmingly to oppose the government’s 3% pay rise as Britain’s biggest health union warned thousands of workers are “fed up of being taken for granted”.
  • The Unison opposition, to be discussed at its annual conference today, comes just days after nine out of 10 members of the Royal College of Nursing said the rise was not acceptable in a consultative ballot.
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Racial disparities in surgical care [PODCAST]

By The Podcast by KevinMD
  • He shares his story and discusses his KevinMD article, “ The bleak reality of racial disparity in surgical care .”
  • “As a practicing surgeon for 30 years in the super-specialized field of otology, neurotology and skull base surgery, I have been privy to some of the most disturbing realities of surgical care.
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Folic acid to be added to non-wholemeal flour under new UK rules

By Jamie Grierson
  • The government said requiring flour millers to boost non-wholemeal wheat flour with folic acid will actively help avoid about 200 neural tube defects in babies each year – reducing the annual UK total by about 20%.
  • Kate Steele, the chief executive of Shine, a charity that provides specialist support for people whose lives have been affected by spina bifida and hydrocephalus, said: “Mandatory fortification of flour with folic acid will improve public health for so many, now and in the future.
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Health official: Booster use may be expanded

By Associated Press
Dr. Francis Collins told "Fox News Sunday" that the panel's recommendation Friday was correct based on a "snapshot" of available data on the effectiveness of Pfizer's two-shot regimen over time. But he said real-time data from the U.S. and Israel continue to come in showing waning efficacy among broader groups of people that will need to be addressed soon. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Gordon Brown calls for urgent action to avert ‘Covid vaccine waste disaster’

By Andrew Gregory Health editor
  • More than 100m Covid vaccine doses are due to expire and be “thrown away” unless global leaders urgently share surplus supplies with the world’s poorest countries, Gordon Brown has warned.
  • Last month, the director general of the World Health Organisation (WHO), Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, called for a global pause of Covid vaccine booster programmes until at least the end of the year to allow all countries to get more of their populations vaccinated.
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Could a pause in screenings increase missed cancer diagnoses?

By Miles J. Varn, MD
  • Although screenings rebounded and approached pre-pandemic levels during the summer of 2020, physicians have raised concerns that missed and delayed cancer screenings have the potential to lead to an increase in the number of people diagnosed with more advanced cancer and, possibly, 10,000 excess cancer deaths over the next decade.
  • In 2020, this pause resulted in an 86 percent to 94 percent drop in preventive cancer screenings compared to the same time period during the three previous years, according to data from 2.7 million electronic patient records representing 190 hospitals in 23 states.
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Brain scans of Black women who experience racism show trauma-like effects, putting them at higher risk for future health problems

By Sierra Carter, The Conversation
  • Black women who have experienced more racism throughout their lives have stronger brain responses to threat, which may hurt their long-term health, according to a new study I conducted with clinical neuropsychologist Negar Fani and other colleagues.
  • We found that Black women who reported more experiences of racial discrimination had more response activity in brain regions that are associated with vigilance and watching out for threat – that is, the middle occipital cortex and ventromedial prefrontal cortex .
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Depression is not a one-size-fits-all condition – we need a more nuanced approach | Sidney Bloch

By Sidney Bloch

Feelings of sadness are ubiquitous but the concept of depression is ill-defined – and the risk is medication being inappropriately prescribed

  • The modern mind is a column where experts discuss mental health issues they are seeing in their work

Not a week goes by that a public figure – Naomi Osaka is the most recent – doesn’t disclose their battle with depression. The frequency of these revelations should occasion no surprise given the ubiquity of feelings of sadness.

So, why depict depression as a conundrum? One way to unravel this matter is by telling the stories of six randomly selected patients (thoroughly de-identified) I have treated in my psychiatric practice, some of them with the help of colleagues.

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >

OVERDOSE DEATHS: Free resources for preventing drug overdose deaths

By Mike Smeth
In 2019, there were almost 71,000 overdose deaths in the United States, and 2020 was even worse, with a record 93,331 Americans dying from drug overdoses. A disproportionately large percentage of these deaths (70 percent) were due to opioids, both prescription and synthetic. The unfortunate reality of drug overdoses is that they are entirely preventable, and yet the likelihood of someone overdosing a second time increases after their first. Why do overdoses happen? There are a variety of

Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
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Freedom cuts both ways on vaccines | Letter

By Letters

The right to exclude is essential to maintaining a range of different environments, writes John Riseley

The step back from vaccination passports in England (Tory MPs fear return of Covid vaccine passports plan in England, 12 September) may be welcomed by those who see them as limiting our freedom or who complain that they would be discriminatory. I suggest, however, that any problem lies with how such a system is applied rather than being fundamental to passports.

If I wish to exclude from my home, say, unvaccinated people then that seems to me a legitimate exercise of my freedom. Similarly for any premises, according to the wishes of the proprietor. A nightclub owner is surely entitled to exclude the unvaccinated no less than those wearing trainers. This freedom is essential to maintaining a range of different environments.

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Health ‘levelling up’ will flop if cuts are not reversed, Javid told

By Andrew Gregory Health editor
  • But the cross-government effort will flop if ministers do not prioritise the prevention of ill health and urgently restore funding to key public health services, Sir Michael Marmot will say in a speech at the Royal College of Nursing’s (RCN) annual congress.
  • But Marmot is expected to argue on Monday that the widening of health inequalities across the UK has at least been partly caused by a decade of dramatic cuts to public health spending by the government.
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Scottish Covid vaccine trialists ‘treated like second-class citizens’

By Libby Brooks
  • Scottish vaccine volunteers are being treated like “second-class citizens” while waiting for the Novavax jab to be approved, an MSP has said, as they continue a months-long fightto have their vaccines recognised on the standard NHS Scotland database.
  • While Scottish government ministers have repeatedly reassured the volunteers that clinical trial participants have the same status as someone vaccinated through the NHS programme, volunteers question how equal that really is when they are not included on the NHS Inform database, cannot get a QR code on their phone and have only a paper record of their status.
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‘Highly effective’ ovarian cancer treatment could help thousands of women

By Andrew Gregory Health editor
  • The pair of drugs – which work together to block the signals cancer cells need to grow – could offer a new treatment option for women with a type of ovarian cancer that rarely responds to chemotherapy or hormone therapy.
  • Experts said the “fantastic” results from early trials of the new drug combination, presented at the European Society for Medical Oncology congress, suggested the treatment was “highly effective”.
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Use of 10p statins in organ donation ‘could save thousands of lives’

By Andrew Gregory Health editor
  • Thousands of lives could be saved globally by giving patients a 10p statin before transplants, doctors have said, as the NHS launches the world’s largest clinical trial in organ donors.
  • Prof John Dark, a leading organ donation expert and a lead investigator of the trial, said he was hopeful that giving statins to organ donors would become standard.
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The fundamental question that encircles the whole practice of psychiatry

By Edward Kai Yan Tie
  • If, with some patients, this is an incremental process of accumulating empathic connection and gradual respect — a slow accretion over days, weeks, months, and years — with Mary, I felt that I had been inducted instantly into her inner circle of friends within seconds of meeting her.
  • In my time with Mary, my mind perseverated on a fundamental question that encircles the whole practice of psychiatry — how do we meet our most psychiatrically ill patients, the floridly manic and psychotic, where they are?
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UK workers on the end of furlough: ‘Will it be Amazon, care homes or driving a van?’

By Harriet Sherwood

The support scheme has proved positive for some, but others will have no jobs to return to. We hear their stories

Since March 2020, 11.6 million UK workers have been furloughed by their employees as a result of the Covid pandemic, with the government paying up to 80% of their wages in order to keep jobs open.

At the scheme’s peak in May 2020, 8.9 million workers – almost a third of the UK workforce – were being paid to stay at home; by the end of July this year, that number had dropped to 1.6 million.

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Does low cholesterol cause cognitive impairment? Part I

By Peter Attia
  • Once you understand that circulating cholesterol is not an accurate proxy for the brain’s cholesterol required for neuronal function, it should come as no surprise that several other studies have demonstrated that PCSK9 inhibitors induced dramatic reductions in plasma LDL-C concentrations to as low as 10 mg/dL without adverse cognitive effects.
  • This study in more than 2,000 patients with familial hypercholesterolemia and at high CVD risk while on a maximally tolerated statin dose found, after nearly two years of treatment, there was no effect on cognitive function in those taking a PCSK9 inhibitor called alirocumab compared to placebo.
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Take care with claims about unvaccinated case rates | David Spiegelhalter and Anthony Masters

By David Spiegelhalter and Anthony Masters
  • The surprise came from the reported case rate per 100,000 population being higher for fully vaccinated people (1,116) aged 40 to 49 than for unvaccinated (880), which appears to question the effectiveness of the vaccines.
  • ONS figures will not be perfect, but suggest about 2,000 confirmed cases per 100,000 unvaccinated people aged 40 to 49, twice the rate as in the vaccinated group, and roughly what we might expect.
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To mask or not to mask? Opinion split on London underground

By Andrew Anthony
  • Several people said that they had just forgotten to wear a mask that day, but others, such as Diana, a housewife from Wembley, north-west London, were adamant that as she had been double vaccinated it was no longer an issue, even as a TfL announcement reminded passengers of their obligation to cover up their mouths and noses.
  • The “do as I say, not as I do” approach to political messaging was again displayed last week when Boris Johnson urged people to wear masks in enclosed spaces, shortly after leading a cabinet meeting of 27 maskless ministers and eight similarly uncovered observers.
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Noisy neighbours spark 67% rise in police complaints

By Michael Savage and James Tapper
  • Police forces across England faced a sharp increase in complaints about noisy neighbours during last year’s lockdown, with claims that years of cuts have left councils struggling to deal with antisocial behaviour.
  • More than half of all police forces across England saw a surge in noise nuisance complaints as the nation was stuck at home, with one force seeing the number of complaints increase fourfold over just two years.
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New measures on freezing eggs leave women in the cold | Eva Wiseman

By Eva Wiseman
  • Forgive me for going on about it (and with numbers, too, how rude), but the fabled cliff is on my mind this week as the government has announced that women are now allowed to freeze their eggs for up to 55 years.
  • But, with all respect to the lovely science, which offers solutions for those having treatments that compromise their fertility, this latest adjustment (proposed so that parents of newborn girls with a genetic condition causing premature menopause could store their eggs) does less than nothing to help most people who want babies.
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‘I felt this huge relief’: how antibody injections free the immunosuppressed under Covid

By Benjamin Ryan
  • So Brown was immediately intrigued when her rheumatologist at Washington University in St Louis, where she works as a laboratory technician, told her the FDA could soon grant emergency authorization for immunocompromised people to receive preventive injections of monoclonal antibodies.
  • In the study supporting this authorization, participants were evenly randomized to receive a single injected dose of Regen-Cov or a placebo within 96 hours of a household member’s coronavirus diagnosis.
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America’s mortality gap should sound a blaring alarm across the Atlantic | Kenan Malik

By Kenan Malik
  • That is true whether they are rich or poor, black or white, toddlers or OAPs. The latest confirmation of the mortality gap across the Atlantic comes from a newly published study that tracked death rates in the United States and Europe over the past 30 years.
  • The paper sets out to compare the changing gap in mortality rates of black and white Americans over time, using Europe as an external benchmark.
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Sharing Mayo Clinic: Genetics connects family members at the hip

By Dana Sparks
  • Before they went through testing at Mayo Clinic Laboratories, Barbara Domaille, Deborah Neville, Pamela Neville, and Rylie Ronnenberg thought there could be a genetic connection to the hip problems they shared.
  • As family members, Barbara Domaille, Deborah Neville, Pamela Neville, and Rylie Ronnenberg share many things in common that they treasure, and only one they wish they didn’t: a hip abnormality called femoroacetabular impingement.
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The Observer view on the government’s flawed winter plan for Covid | Observer editorial

By Observer editorial
  • Clinicians are expecting greater strain than usual from serious respiratory viruses and influenza as a result of reduced population immunity because of social distancing over the past year; if Covid hospital cases rise significantly, this will have a profound impact on people who have already waited months for life-changing surgery such as hip replacements.
  • With the prime minister and his cabinet publicly flaunting their own guidance, it is perhaps little wonder mask wearing has dropped significantly since mid-July, when the government made face coverings in England a recommendation rather than compulsory on public transport and in shops.
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Psychosis Risk Linked to Cats

By Neuroscience News
  • Exposure to toxoplasma, a disease carried by cats, may increase the likelihood of developing psychosis in young people already at risk, a new Orygen study has found.
  • Summary: Toxoplasma exposure can increase the likelihood of developing psychosis in those with risk factors for mental health disorders, a new study reports.
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The Mediterranean Diet Leads to Better Cognitive Functions and Memory

By Neuroscience News
  • They all participated in the PREDIMED-PLUS trial, a multi-center study that 23 Spanish research centers take part in and which analyzes the effect of the traditional Mediterranean diet with energetic restrictions, promoting physical activity and behavioral intervention, on weight loss and the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.
  • According to the research, this is because most people with these cognitive abilities had a high adherence to the low-calorie Mediterranean diet, which led to clinically relevant weight loss.
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Two-Hour Glucose Tolerance Test Predicts Decline in Episodic Memory

By Neuroscience News
  • In a study of the University of Turku and Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, the researchers observed that already a higher two-hour glucose level in the glucose tolerance test predicts worse performance in a test measuring episodic memory after ten years.
  • In the new study, the researchers studied whether the glucose levels of two-hour glucose tolerance test are connected to cognitive functions after a ten-year follow-up period.
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Australia Covid live news update: Victoria records 507 new cases and one death ahead of reopening roadmap release; pools to open across Sydney

By Michael McGowan

Premier Dan Andrews is to release Victoria’s roadmap out of lockdown a day after protests in Melbourne, Sydney, Byron Bay and Brisbane. Follow updates live

The Australian Medical Association (AMA) wants governments to stop using vaccination as the only marker for easing public health restrictions.

The organisation’s federal body put out a statement this morning calling on national cabinet to approach the easing of measures “progressively and with caution” and to include “pause and assess periods” in its recovery plans “to ensure strong control of new infection numbers are maintained”.

When implementing the national plan we must be realistic, careful and test each change and the impact of measures before moving to the next phase, given that there are thousands of Covid-19 cases in the community.

It must also take account of vulnerable communities, such as Indigenous and those in regional and rural areas, because the plan is only as good as the vaccination rates in those vulnerable communities.

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Catching the rebound: people who went big to get over their breakups

By Jenny Valentish

From creating a standup show to climbing Everest, five people share their extreme – healing – heartbreak manoeuvres

Five-thousand feet above the ground, I struck up a conversation with the woman next to me, trying to ignore the skydiving instructor strapped to my back. We had something in common: I’d just been dumped; she was celebrating her divorce papers coming through. Come at us, ground.

A breakup is the perfect time for a radical act, and perhaps even something more long-lasting than hurtling out of a plane. Guardian Australia spoke to five people who broke new ground while on the rebound.

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Ministers told to bar EU from UK trial data in vaccines row

By James Tapper
  • Jonathan Van-Tam made the extraordinary proposal after months of uncertainty for the 19,000 volunteers who are effectively unable to travel to Europe to see family, work or go on holiday because they took part in trials of Novavax and Valneva.
  • England’s deputy chief medical officer asked ministers to withhold all UK clinical trial data from the EU if European countries continued to deny entry to British vaccine trial volunteers, the Observer can reveal.
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All the Buzz About Bee Venom (and More)

By Molly Glick
  • While it may sound like a nightmare for some (particularly those with allergies), evidence increasingly suggests that a range of bee-derived substances can help address medical conditions that lack highly effective treatments.
  • And it isn’t particularly difficult to create synthetic melittin in a lab, Pan says, which is optimal for drug development due to its convenience, quality control, and relative safety compared to crude natural sources.
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MY 20TH ANNIVERSARY AS A CANCER SURVIVOR: What I’ve learned on my journey

By Diana Raab
This fall marks my 20th anniversary as a breast cancer survivor. During the early part of my journey, I felt a sense of hopelessness and uncertainty regarding my future. At the age of 47, it was challenging for me to accept the loss of a breast, especially since there was no cancer in my family. It was 2001, and I was raising three teenagers. I worked out regularly, cooked fresh meals every night and managed a freelance writing career. I The post MY 20TH ANNIVERSARY AS A CANCER

Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
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UK teachers targeted by Covid anti-vaxxers as schools prepare to vaccinate pupils

By Julie Henry
  • Heads are expecting anti-vax groups to ramp up action in coming weeks as schools begin to distribute consent forms to families, followed by a staggered start to the vaccinations.
  • Letters circulated by campaign groups and parents are accusing schools of sanctioning “medical experimentation” if they allow the Covid vaccination programme for 12- to 15-year-olds to go ahead.
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New neuroscience research suggests the cerebral cortex acts as the brain’s hourglass

By The Conversation
  • But our recent study has shown in laboratory mice that the cerebral cortex, which is responsible for the most complex brain functions – including perception, language, thought and episodic memory – helps us track our need for sleep.
  • Research in support of this theory has found that individual areas of cortex can briefly switch off when overworked, even while the rest of the brain is still awake.
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Prove your Covid status if you want to party, UK students told

By Anna Fazackerley
  • Student unions are telling students they won’t be admitted to freshers’ parties in the next few weeks without a Covid pass or negative lateral flow test, in an attempt to avoid a repeat of last year’s outbreaks on campus.
  • But Professor Steve West, president of Universities UK, said universities and student unions were “taking their responsibilities very seriously” and most were introducing tougher Covid guidelines at events.
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My Child Was Vulnerable Long Before the Pandemic. But the Wait for a Vaccine Is Excruciating

By Taylor Harris
  • Each time I’ve learned a Black person was killed for walking with iced tea or Skittles or a cell phone, killed, even, while sleeping, a tiny piece of me, perhaps one bit of marrow untouched by skepticism, courses through and cushions my bones: No, this can’t be.
  • And now, as I wait for COVID-19 vaccines for children under 12, I am reminded once more how hard it is to keep going amid uncertainty, disappointment, even fury.
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Consumer Health: 5 types of thyroid cancer

September is Thyroid Cancer Awareness Month, which make this a good time to learn about the five types of thyroid cancer. More than 44,000 new cases of thyroid cancer will be diagnosed in the U.S. this year, and more than 2,000 people will die of the disease, according to the American Cancer Society. Thyroid cancer occurs in the cells of the thyroid, a butterfly-shaped gland located at the base of your neck. Your thyroid produces […]Read more >Similar articles >

Mayo Clinic Q and A: COVID-19 vaccine boosters and third doses

DEAR MAYO CLINIC:Both of my parents have been vaccinated for COVID-19. The doctor told my mom she is eligible for a third dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, but my dad is not eligible for a booster now. Can you explain who needs an additional vaccine now, and the differences between a booster and third dose. ANSWER:It's good to know that your parents are among the millions of people who have been vaccinated for COVID-19. A […]Read more >Similar articles >

Mayo Clinic Minute: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease brought on by tobacco

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD) refers to a progressive group of lung diseases, including chronic bronchitis and emphysema, that make it hard to breathe. Millions of people around the globe die each year because of COPD, and nearly 16 million people in the U.S. have a form of the disease. The No. 1 cause of COPD in developed countries is tobacco smoking, according to Dr. John Costello, consultant pulmonologist at Mayo Clinic Healthcare in London. Watch: […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Racial identity attitudes predict coping strategies in response to racial microaggressions

By Christian Rigg
  • Each participant completed the People of Color Racial Identity Attitudes Scale, which scores individuals on four statuses of racial identity: Conformity (devaluation of one’s own racial group), Dissonance (ambivalence towards one’s racial group and confused racial identity), Immersion-Emersion (idealization and immersion in one own’s group and denigration of White culture), and Internalization (positive commitment to one’s own group and clear sense of racial self).
  • The results were similar for Asian participants: higher conformity and dissonance (as well as higher immersion-emersion) related to more avoidant and active antisocial coping strategies.
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Covid antibody drug Ronapreve to be given to vulnerable NHS patients

By PA Media
  • The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) said on Friday that it had the potential to benefit thousands of patients, with its introduction initially targeted at those who had not mounted an antibody response against Covid-19.
  • In August, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) said the clinical trial data it assessed showed that Ronapreve could be used to prevent infection, treat symptoms of serious infection and cut the likelihood of being admitted to hospital.
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Coronavirus live news: holiday bookings expected to surge after England travel rules change; clashes at Melbourne protests

By Jane Clinton
  • With many universities set to run pop-ups and walk-ins throughout the first weeks of term it has never been easier to get protected, so I urge anyone yet to be vaccinated to take up the offer as soon as possible.
  • Unvaccinated university students have been urged to get a Covid jab in freshers’ week to protect themselves and their peers against the virus, PA reports.
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Could gene editing chickens prevent future pandemics?

By Natalie Grover
  • The use of gene editing techniques “could not only exacerbate the negative effects of industrial farming on nature, animals and people, but it could effectively turn both nature and ourselves (through the food we eat) into a gigantic genetic engineering experiment with unknown, potentially irrevocable outcomes”, Greenpeace said in a statement earlier this year.
  • Until an alternative protein kicks in as the default solution, then the traditional way of consuming protein needs to be improved, says Yehuda Elram, head of the Israeli startup EggXYt, which is working on gene-editing tools to tweak DNA fragments in chickens to attack viruses that cause avian flu.
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Asylum seeker given £100,000 hospital bill after suffering stroke

By Robyn Vinter
  • The Home Office said though outstanding debt to the NHS is a factor in whether to grant immigration applications generally, it does not apply to people with an asylum claim or appeal in process.
  • This was certainly true for Mujakachi, who before his stroke had stopped taking medication and attending medical appointments because he believed an NHS debt of more than £500 would cause his asylum claim, which began in 2009, to be rejected.
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Texas anti-abortion law shows ‘terrifying’ fragility of women’s rights, say activists

By Lizzy Davies
  • The new anti-abortion law in Texas is a “terrifying” reminder of the fragility of hard-won rights, pro-choice activists have said, as they warn of a “more aggressive, much better organised [and] better funded” global opposition movement.
  • She said the Texas law was “really terrifying” because of the emboldening message it sent to other anti-choice governments and organisations, with the fact it had happened in the US giving it “a huge weight and legitimacy”.
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Fit in my 40s: I suck at table tennis. Instead, here are my final seven fitness lessons

By Zoe Williams
  • This is my final fitness column, so I may be imparting more wisdom about trying new things than advice on table tennis, which I suck at.
  • It was shortly after the table tennis, in which Chinese player battled Chinese player to the final victory of Ma Long in the Tokyo Olympics, when Sophy, my informal instructor, taught me and my son some basics.
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Cyclist run over by partially sighted motorist still battling with insurers

By Miles Brignall

Joanna Davies was dragged along the road for 20 metres but has been offered less than half the £11,000 she has claimed

A Hampshire cyclist who was driven over by a partially sighted motorist has described her struggle to get the driver’s insurer, Aviva, to pay out.

It is more than a year since Joanna Davies was dragged along the road for 20 metres by the elderly driver, who was found to have such poor eyesight that his car was impounded by the police on the spot.

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Teenage girls, body image and Instagram’s ‘perfect storm’

By Dan Milmo and Clea Skopeliti

The suffering of the photo-sharing app’s users came into focus this week with the leak of Facebook’s internal research

Emily started using Instagram when she was in her mid-teens and found it helpful at first. She used the photo-sharing app to follow fitness influencers, but what began as a constructive relationship with the platform spiralled into a crisis centred on body image. At 19 she was diagnosed with an eating disorder.

“I felt like my body wasn’t good enough, because even though I did go to the gym a lot, my body still never looked like the bodies of these influencers,” says Emily, now a 20-year-old a student who is in recovery.

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >
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People with chronic conditions among most at risk from Covid even after jabs

By Hannah Devlin
  • Aziz Sheikh, professor of primary care research and development and director of the Usher Institute at the University of Edinburgh, said that for some groups the increased risk was due to increased exposure to Covid-19, but that it was possible those with Down’s syndrome had an additional underlying vulnerability.
  • The research found that people with Down’s syndrome had a roughly 13-fold increased risk of death from Covid-19 compared with the general population, even after vaccination, while those with dementia and Parkinson’s disease had a twofold increase.
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The agony of acne: ‘I channelled adolescent turmoil into a fixation with my face’

By Oscar Rickett
  • My mornings now were defined by a torturous skincare routine: face wash, cleanser, an over-the-counter cream or liquid designed to treat acne – there was one that had the consistency of wood glue, and made my skin peel, something I persisted in seeing as a “good sign” – and finally a topical solution I’d got from my GP.
  • While most of the group is taken up with pictures of acne and recommendations for treatment, it is also a place to share the enduring pain caused by skin problems.
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Australia Covid live news update: Victoria records 535 new cases and one death as police move to block anti-lockdown protests; one new case in Qld

By Justine Landis-Hanley
  • Victoria’s police force will embark on its biggest operation in two decades to quash an anti-lockdown protest in Melbourne, as “picnic day” arrives for pandemic-fatigued residents.
  • The partial public transport shutdown was made at the request of police after 4,000 people attended a violent anti-lockdown protest on 21 August.
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FDA Panel Recommends Against Following White House Plan for Booster Doses for All

By Alice Park
  • A U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) committee voted unanimously Friday to recommend booster doses of Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine for those over age 65 and those at higher risk of exposure to the virus, including healthcare, frontline and essential workers, under emergency use authorization, but stopped short of recommending boosters for the general population.
  • And while Pfizer-BioNTech provided data showing an additional dose of its vaccine could increase levels of neutralizing antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, it did not provide answers to questions about how well that protection could stop transmission of the disease, among other things, to the committee’s satisfaction.
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2 MacArthur Fellows recommend readings and video for Latinx Heritage Month

By USC News
  • MacArthur "genius grant" recipients Natalia Molina, Distinguished Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, and Josh Kun, professor of communication and American studies and ethnicity at USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism and USC Dornsife, recommend six artistic works to celebrate Latinx Heritage Month.
  • Distinguished Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity at USC Dornsife and author of the forthcoming A Place at the Nayarit: How a Mexican Restaurant in Los Angeles Nourished Its Community
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Case of BSE found on farm in Somerset but ‘no risk to food safety’

By PA Media
  • A spokesperson for the Food Standards Agency said: “There are strict controls in place to protect consumers from the risk of BSE, including controls on animal feed, and removal of the parts of cattle most likely to carry BSE infectivity.
  • It said there was “no risk to food safety”, adding that “precautionary movement restrictions” were in place to stop the movement of livestock in the area while “further investigations continue to identify the origin of the disease”.
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Key FDA advisory committee rejects COVID vaccine boosters for the general population

A key advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration overwhelmingly rejected vaccine boosters for the general U.S. population for now, but it voted unanimously in favor of giving boosters to those 65 and older as well as high risk individuals.The recommendations mark a pivotal moment in the debate around boosters. William Brangham joins Amna Nawaz to discuss. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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How Scents Take On Meaning

By Neuroscience News
  • “So far, only a few studies on olfactory perception have analysed regions outside the olfactory bulb and olfactory cortex regions in rodents,” says Professor Denise Manahan-Vaughan, spokesperson of Collaborative Research Centre 874 Integration and Representation of Sensory Processes.
  • “ Olfactory information storage engages subcortical and cortical brain regions that support valence determination ” by Denise Manahan-Vaughan et al.
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Converting Glioma Cells Into Neurons May Treat Glioblastoma

By Neuroscience News
  • Together, these findings suggest that cellular reprogramming of glioma cells towards neuronal cell types, offers a promising therapeutic strategy that can slow down the growth of GBMs. Such a targeted approach can also help overcome the harmful side effects of conventional anti-cancer treatments on healthy brain cells.
  • Summary: Cellular reprogramming of glioma cells into neural cells may be a promising treatment for glioblastoma brain cancer.
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Why was China’s biggest movie star was erased from the internet?

By USC News
Zhao Wei was the Reese Witherspoon of China before she was censored by the Communist Party. “Zhao Wei is like a poster child for what the Communist Party sees as what’s wrong with celebrity culture in China,” USC Dornsife’s Stanley Rosen says. “It’s a demonstration that no one, no matter how wealthy or popular, is too big to pursue.” The post Why was China’s biggest movie star was erased from the internet? appeared first on USC News. Read more from The Wall Street Journal […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Time Until Dementia Symptoms Appear Can Be Estimated via Brain Scan

By Neuroscience News
  • “I perform amyloid PET scans for research studies, and when I tell cognitively normal individuals about positive results, the first question is always, ‘How long do I have until I get dementia?’,” said senior author Suzanne Schindler, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of neurology.
  • Summary: A new algorithm uses neuroimaging data of amyloid levels in the brain and takes into account a person’s age to determine when a person with genetic Alzheimer’s risk factors, and with no signs of cognitive decline, will develop the disease.
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News Wrap: France recalling ambassadors from U.S., Australia over submarine deal

In our news wrap Friday, France is recalling its ambassadors from the U.S. and Australia in a fury over a submarine deal, more than 170 people including some Americans boarded a flight out of Afghanistan, Republican Rep. Anthony Gonzalez says he won't run again after voting to impeach former President Trump, and a U.N. report found greenhouse gas emissions are set to rise 16 percent by 2030. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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FDA advisors OK Pfizer COVID booster for seniors, high-risk groups

By Jim Wappes
  • Federal vaccine advisors today approved a third booster dose of Pfizer-BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine on an emergency use basis, but only for the most vulnerable groups, which includes those age 65 and older and people at high risk of severe disease.
  • The group's discussion also came in the midst of a spate of new data this week on waning immunity and booster doses, especially a large study in Israel that found that a third dose substantially reduced COVID-19 cases and severe illness in those ages 60 and older.
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Trial Into Antioxidant for Parkinson’s Disease Yields Disappointing Results

  • 17, 2021 (HealthDay News) – Researchers hoped to show that the natural antioxidant urate could delay Parkinson's disease progression, but a study completed at Massachusetts General Hospital dashed those expectations.
  • "The convergence of epidemiological, biological and clinical data from past research made a compelling argument that elevating urate, the main antioxidant circulating in the blood, could protect against the oxidative damage thought to play a role in Parkinson's disease," said senior author Dr. Michael Schwarzschild, a neurologist at Mass General and a professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School.
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Millions Could Soon Lose Medicaid Coverage Started During the Pandemic

  • "States can take actions to minimize unnecessary disenrollment and ensure that those losing Medicaid coverage know about their other coverage options, particularly Marketplace coverage with premium tax credits," Buettgens added in an institute news release.
  • Fifteen million Americans who enrolled in Medicaid during the pandemic could lose their coverage when the emergency declaration ends, according to an analysis by the Urban Institute, a social policy think tank.
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‘They’re terrified’: how Melbourne’s City of Hume became the centre of Victoria’s Delta outbreak

By Luke Henriques-Gomes Social affairs and inequality editor
  • “We have been for some time calling for extra resources,” says the 33-year-old mayor of Hume, Joseph Haweil.
  • As daily case numbers in Hume rose from dozens to hundreds, the Victorian government established a drive-through vaccination clinic at the old Ford factory in Broadmeadows.
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How To Be Careful of ‘Miracle’ Weight Loss Promises

  • Some products promoting weight loss and sports performance have been found to include ingredients that are not listed on the label, says Pieter Cohen, MD, a doctor at Cambridge Health Alliance.
  • “Many so-called miracle weight loss supplements and foods (including teas and coffees) do not live up to their claims and can cause serious harm,” FDA spokesperson Courtney Rhodes says.
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News Scan for Sep 17, 2021

By Jim Wappes
  • Long COVID-19 was more likely to occur in those 40 and older, women, and those with at least one underlying health condition, according to an MMWR study today.
  • Since March 2020, children's body mass index (BMI) has increased at almost double its prepandemic rate, according to a study today in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report ( MMWR ).
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5 Stories: World’s largest carbon capture plant goes online, Paris landmark goes undercover and other stories you missed

By Deema Zein
The world's largest carbon capture plant is up and running in Iceland, workers fulfill artists Christo and Jeanne-Claude's posthumous dream of wrapping the Arc de Triomphe in fabric and school districts across the country face bus driver shortages. Check out these stories and others you might have missed on this week's episode of 5 Stories. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Rodney Hanners named CEO of Keck Medicine of USC and president and CEO of USC Health System

By USC News
  • Prior to joining Keck Medicine in 2015, Hanners served as senior vice president and chief operating officer for Children's Hospital Los Angeles and helped the organization achieve a ranking of fifth in the nation by U.S News & World Report.
  • Hanners was named Hospital CEO of the Year by the Los Angeles Business Journal in 2020 and received the 2020 Leadership in Healthcare Award from National Medical Fellowships.
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CDC: Moderna COVID vaccine most protective against hospital cases

By Jim Wappes
  • All three COVID-19 vaccines currently in use in the United States offer significant protection against hospitalization for COVID-19, but Moderna is the most effective among US adults who are not immunocompromised, according to new data published today in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report .
  • In a study involving a case-control analysis of 3,689 adults who were hospitalized at 21 US hospitals at some point from Mar 11 through Aug 15, the vaccine effectiveness (VE) against COVID-19 hospitalizations was 93% for Moderna, 88% for Pfizer/BioNTech, and 71% for the single-dose Johnson & Johnson (J&J) vaccine.
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No 10 accused of sidelining behaviour experts on latest Covid measures

By Hannah Devlin Science correspondent

Exclusive: SPI-B scientists warn of lack of independent advice at a time when social norms are replacing laws

Senior scientific advisers have publicly accused the government of sidelining behavioural experts and appearing unwilling to listen to “uncomfortable truths” on vaccine passports and masks during the pandemic.

The scientists told the Guardian that their input to the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage) was apparently no longer wanted owing to the expansion of in-house expertise.

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Key nursing home staff lag in COVID-19 vaccination, study shows

By Jim Wappes
  • COVID-19 vaccination has had an important role in lowering infection and death rates in US nursing home residents, but low staff vaccine coverage poses a risk of introduction and spread of the virus in facilities—especially in the milieu of more transmissible variants, according to the authors.
  • Vaccination rates rose 2.7 and 1.4 percentage points in staff and residents, respectively, for each 10-percentage-point increase in county-wide adult vaccination coverage.
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Ways to Organize Breast Cancer Paperwork

  • One document you'll want to have handy is a paper copy of your biopsy or pathology report, says Julie Schreiber, an oncology patient navigation supervisor at Northside Hospital Cancer Institute in Atlanta.
  • Personal information: Family doctor, health insurance, emergency contacts, a list of your regular medicines, vitamins/supplements, allergies, vaccines, blood type, current and past addresses, birthday, living will, and medical power of attorney
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Increasing production of aquatic foods a win-win for people and planet

By Christopher Sweeney
  • Sustainably ramping up production and consumption of these foods through aquaculture (or farming in the ocean), supply chain improvements, and better fisheries management is critical to addressing staggering global levels of malnutrition and associated micronutrient deficiencies, Golden said.
  • To better understand the nutritional benefits of the full spectrum of aquatic foods, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health’s Christopher Golden and colleagues created individual nutrient profiles for more than 3,750 species, ranging from water spinach to clams and cockles to sockeye salmon.
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Move of the week: how to have happier hips | Shona Vertue

By Shona Vertue

Pigeon pose stretches tight glutes and opens the front of the hips

In the pursuit of more flexible hips, this is a must-add to your mobility repertoire. This position not only helps to stretch out tight glutes (in your buttocks), but also opens up the anterior (front) portion of the hips to combat hours spent sitting down. If you find that your hips are falling off to one side, try raising them slightly using a block or a cushion – this will ensure that you get the most out of this posture.

Related: Move of the week: how to ease bad posture | Shona Vertue

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Covid levels rising among schoolchildren in England, data shows

By Nicola Davis Science correspondent
  • But the ONS team said their data suggests the rate of increase in the percentage of people testing positive now appears to be slowing down in Scotland – a finding that chimes with a recent decrease in daily case numbers.
  • According to figures from the Office for National Statistics, based on swabs collected from randomly selected households, an estimated one in 80 people in England had Covid in the week ending 11 September – a slight drop relative to the week before – while the rate was higher in the other three nations at an estimated 1 in 60 in Wales, 1 in 75 in Northern Ireland and around 1 in 45 in Scotland.
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Webinar: What solutions-focused journalism has to offer health care reporters

By Barbara Mantel
  • At the time, I was only vaguely aware that there was a name for this kind of work — solutions-focused journalism — and that newsrooms were increasingly looking for stories that not only identified social problems but sought to rigorously examine what was being done to solve them.
  • Julia Hotz is a journalist who has reported solutions-focused stories for The New York Times, The Boston Globe, Wired and others.
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Amber list scrapped in shake-up of England’s Covid travel rules

By Peter Walker and Ben Quinn

Traffic light system replaced, with overseas destinations now listed as either ‘red’ or OK for travel

Rules for English travellers heading overseas have been significantly simplified, with the “amber” list of countries scrapped and the traffic light designation replaced with destinations listed as either “red” or OK for travel.

The long-heralded shake-up of the travel regulations, announced by the Department for Transport on Friday, also included a reduction in the number of countries placed on what was the “red” list, with almost all travel not permitted. Turkey, Pakistan and Maldives are among eight countries to be removed from the red list.

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There is nothing soft about “soft skills”

By Sherine Salib, MD
  • As leaders, it is imperative that we not only consider the “hard skills” (performance) but also the “soft skills” (trust-enhancing human skills) when making decisions on hiring, promoting, and appraising others.
  • The top leadership competencies were all the so-called “soft skills,” skills at the heart of building trust.
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Troops drafted in to help out Scottish ambulance service

By Libby Brooks Scotland correspondent
  • The first minister, Nicola Sturgeon, revealed on Thursday that the Scottish government was seeking “targeted military assistance” to ease pressure on the ambulance service.
  • The Scottish ambulance service chief executive, Pauline Howie, told BBC Radio Scotland on Friday that logistical staff would also be made available to support paramedics and technicians, and that details would be worked out in the coming days as the service faced “unprecedented” pressure.
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Flu shots and COVID-19

By Jason Howland
  • Dr. Priya Sampathkumar, a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist, says getting vaccinated for the flu is safe.
  • The number of flu cases this past year was low, and health experts like Dr. Sampathkumar attribute that to the COVID-19 pandemic and preventive measures that were put in place to reduce the spread of COVID-19.
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Interactive Feature Test

  • Tracey Marks, MD, Atlanta-based psychiatrist and psychotherapist specializing in the interplay between mind and body and author of Master Your Sleep: Proven Methods Simplified.
  • Myron Wentz, PhD, microbiologist, immunologist, founder of Sanoviv Medical Institute, and author of The Healthy Home .
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Some Vaping Companies Are Turning to Synthetic Nicotine to Outsmart the FDA

By Jamie Ducharme
  • Johnston, who owns the Texas-based vaping company VaporSalon, tried to follow the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) guidelines for selling e-cigarette products, which required all manufacturers to file paperwork known as premarket tobacco product applications (PMTAs) by Sept.
  • Tony Abboud, executive director of the Vapor Technology Association, a trade group for the e-cigarette industry, says there are plenty of non-regulatory reasons a company might want to use synthetic nicotine—its purity, for example, or freedom from traditional tobacco, with all its baggage and sordid history.
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Coronavirus: plans to end free rapid tests in England ‘reckless’

By Josh Halliday
  • Mayors, teaching unions and directors of public health said charging for lateral flow tests was a “backward step” that threatened to throw schools back into chaos, accelerate the spread of the virus and deepen health inequalities.
  • There was no detail on how schools or care homes would be able to fund the provision of lateral flow tests once they are no longer free.
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Appeal court overturns UK puberty blockers ruling for under-16s

By Haroon Siddique Legal affairs correspondent

Tavistock and Portman NHS foundation trust wins challenge over case brought by Keira Bell last year

The court of appeal has overturned a controversial judgment that children under the age of 16 considering gender reassignment are unlikely to be mature enough to give informed consent to be prescribed puberty-blocking drugs.

Tavistock and Portman NHS foundation trust, which runs NHS England’s only gender identity development service for children, challenged a high court ruling last year in a case brought against the service by Keira Bell, a 24-year-old woman who began taking puberty blockers when she was 16 before detransitioning. The other applicant was the unnamed mother of a teenage autistic girl on the waiting list for treatment.

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The canary in a coal mine: Measles as an indicator of humanitarian progress

By Momentum
  • Amidst endemic instability, the global COVID-19 pandemic, economic collapse, infrastructural decay, climate change and science misinformation, we’re seeing increased spread and return of measles to countries in which it was previously eradicated.
  • The UN’s goal was to expand vaccination coverage to reach populations with the lowest vaccination rates and highest disease prevalence and, as a result, highlight measles mortality as a prime indicator of progress.
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People with insecure attachment are more likely to form illusory, parasocial relationships with TV characters

By Beth Ellwood
  • The study revealed that people who are high in anxious or avoidant attachment are more likely to form illusory reciprocal relationships with their favorite TV characters, suggesting that bonding with story characters can help relieve attachment insecurity.
  • The researchers specifically opted to study whether the anxious and avoidant attachment styles might influence the extent that people identify with characters and develop illusory relationships with them.
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The dubious rise of ivermectin as a Covid-19 treatment, explained

By Kelsey Piper
  • Meanwhile, even as many Americans resort to a drug with a sketchy evidence base to fight Covid-19, the US estimates 15 million vaccine doses have gone to waste as the country struggles to persuade more people to get the vaccine, for which the case is much, much stronger .
  • Partisans on the other side have made their own sloppy (if decidedly less egregious) claims in the effort to debunk the ivermectin mania, ridiculing the drug as “horse paste” when it’s actually an anti-parasitic medication for humans, taken by hundreds of millions each year.
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Wales to require NHS Covid passes to attend nightclubs and events

By Steven Morris
  • People will have to show an NHS Covid pass to enter nightclubs and attend many events in Wales from next month, the first minister, Mark Drakeford, has announced.
  • Drakeford said: “We have high levels of the virus in our communities and while our fantastic vaccination programme has helped stop thousands more people from becoming seriously ill or dying, the pressure on the NHS is increasing.
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New study provides insight into how heterosexual college students seek out hookups

By Eric W. Dolan
  • “We were interested because there was a dearth of research directed towards understanding how men and women solicit short-term partners, and a dearth of research investigating which actions are most effective for this for each sex,” said study author T.
  • Despite the growing interest in short-term sexual relationships and so-called “hookup culture” among college students, researchers had not examined which tactics are used to solicit a hookup.
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Dentists Chip Away at Uninsured Problem by Offering Patients Membership Plans

By Phil Galewitz, Kaiser Health News
  • To help patients lacking dental insurance, White in 2019 started offering a membership plan that looks much like an insurance policy — except it’s good only at his offices in Reno and Elko.
  • But for patients without a job-based plan, purchasing an independent dental policy is expensive and, unlike buying health insurance, it’s unclear whether the benefit outweighs the costs.
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Covid-Overwhelmed Hospitals Postpone Cancer Care and Other Treatment

By Erik Neumann, Jefferson Public Radio
  • A few weeks ago, Callagan was driving the nearly four-hour trek to Oregon Health & Science University in Portland for a bone marrow transplant, a major procedure that would have required him to stay in the hospital for a week and remain in the Portland area for tests for an additional two weeks.
  • OHSU spokesperson Erik Robinson said the hospital, which is the state’s only public academic medical center and serves patients from across the region, has had to postpone numerous surgeries and procedures in the wake of the delta surge of the pandemic.
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Scientists Examine Kids’ Unique Immune Systems as More Fall Victim to Covid

By Liz Szabo, Kaiser Health News
  • A growing body of evidence suggests that kids’ innate immune systems usually nip the infection early on, preventing the virus from gaining a foothold and multiplying unchecked, said Dr. Lael Yonker, an assistant professor of pediatrics at Massachusetts General Hospital.
  • Although there’s no evidence the delta variant causes more severe disease, the virus is so infectious that children are being hospitalized in large numbers — mostly in states with low vaccination rates.
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UK scientist warns over relaxation of Covid travel rules

By Jamie Grierson
  • It has been reported that double-jabbed travellers will no longer need to take a more costly PCR test after returning from green countries, but take a cheaper lateral flow test instead, while pre-departure tests, taken 72 hours before a passenger flies home are also likely to be scrapped.
  • “The devil’s in the detail in this and I would really hope there will be a very strong mandate that any lateral flow positive test from travel have to get a confirmatory PCR test because in my opinion we still that genome level surveillance of Covid cases being introduced into the UK from abroad.”
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Boris Johnson chairs first meeting of new cabinet as updated Covid travel rules set to be announced – live

By Andrew Sparrow
  • Boris Johnson is chairing the first meeting of his new cabinet this morning.
  • But, look, I know this has been raised by the travel industry, that they think some of that testing may be unnecessary, may be onerous - the government will be listening to that and the Covid sub-committee of cabinet that decide these things will be considering that probably later today.
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Consumer Health: Back to school — and bullying

For many families, the start of school is a busy, exciting time of year. For some students, though, returning to school also means bullying, and the feelings of anxiety, sadness and loneliness bullying can cause. Up to 20% of students 12–18 experience bullying in the U.S. each year, according to StopBullying.gov, which is a resource managed by the Department of Health and Human Resources dedicated to providing information about bullying. Bullying is a form of […]Read more >Similar articles >

Consumer Health: What you can do to help prevent suicide

World Suicide Prevention Day will be observed on Friday, Sept. 10, which makes this a good time to learn more about suicide and how you can help someone in danger of suicide. Suicide is a tragic reaction to stressful life situations. Most often, suicidal thoughts are the result of feeling helpless or unable to cope with what seems like an overwhelming life situation. Without hope for the future, suicide may seem like the only solution.There […]Read more >Similar articles >

Patients in Phoenix area now can benefit from Mayo Clinic’s advanced care at home model of care

PHOENIX ―Mayo Clinichas expanded its innovative advanced care at home model of care, which provides comprehensive care to patients in the comfort of their own homes, to Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Beginning this week, many patients in the Phoenix and Scottsdale area who otherwise would need to be hospitalized will be able to receive in-person and virtual care through Mayo Clinic's advanced care at home platform. Under 24/7 direction of Mayo Clinic physicians, advanced care […]Read more >Similar articles >