Jul 29, 2021

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A group’s moral values may help determine the likelihood of hate-motivated harmful acts

By USC News
  • "The most striking aspect of our study is our use of geospatial modeling, which showed that the prevalence of hate groups at the county level can be predicted based on the psychological makeup of that county -- specifically, the moral concerns," said corresponding author Morteza Dehghani, associate professor of psychology and computer science, and a researcher at USC Dornsife's Brain and Creativity Institute.
  • The study suggests that the prevalence of specific moral concerns is predictive of the number of hate groups per capita in that county, added Dehghani, five of whose students -- from USC Dornsife's Department of Psychology and the Department of Computer Science at USC Viterbi School of Engineering -- also worked on the research.
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UK Covid cases rise for second day running amid drop in testing

By Nicola Davis Science correspondent
  • While the latest flu and Covid surveillance report from PHE suggests there may have been a slight decline in prevalence of the virus, Hugh Montgomery, a professor of intensive care medicine at University College London, who also took part in the RSM seminar, suggested the decline in testing may not necessarily be down to fewer infections.
  • Montgomery also raised concerns about uptake of Covid jabs, saying the latest PHE figures showed current vaccination rates were “woefully low”.
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USC collaborates in $20 million effort to push new frontiers in AI and optimization

By USC News
  • "Truly merging the expertise coming from AI and optimization research can be the big step change we need in AI to solve societal problems by both improving scalability and widening applications," said Dilkina, co-director of the USC Center for AI in Society.
  • A team of researchers, including four USC computer science professors, has been awarded a $20 million grant by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to fund the NSF Artificial Intelligence (AI) Institute for Advances in Optimization (AI4OPT).
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AstraZeneca sales of Covid vaccine triple to $1.2bn in first half of 2021

By Julia Kollewe
  • AstraZeneca has reported a boost in sales of its Covid-19 vaccine, which tripled to $1.2bn (£900m) in the first half of this year – but remained significantly below the earnings of its US rival Pfizer.
  • AstraZeneca said about $572m of vaccine sales came from Europe during the first half of 2021, in a period when the company was embroiled in a court battle with the European Commission over delivery delays, and a further $455m from emerging markets.
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Data breaches on the rise: What you need to know

By Karen Blum
  • Med-Data said a former employee saved protected health information files containing patient Social Security numbers, addresses and birthdates to personal folders that they then published on a public website.
  • However, the intrusions resulted in potential access to and theft of patient information, such as patient’s names, addresses, birth dates, Social Security numbers, and medical treatment details.
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3-year-old takes on rare cancer with a little help from his friends

By DeeDee Stiepan
  • This is especially important for children with cancer ― children like 3-year-old Rhett Flaten who in May became the 5,000th patient to receive the cutting-edge treatment since the Rochester Proton Beam Therapy Program began six years ago.
  • Given his young age, given the location of the tumor, proton therapy made the most sense for Rhett's treatment," says Dr. Safia Ahmed, a Mayo Clinic radiation oncologist.
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COVID-19 Vaccine Mandates: Americans’ Sharp Divide

By Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
A deepening divide along political party lines regarding COVID-19 vaccine requirements raises pressing questions about how the U.S. might pursue flagging vaccination rates. A recently released POLITICO-Harvard poll show that Americans are sharply divided about whether most private employers or schools should require COVID-19 vaccines as part of reopening efforts. Per the results, Democrats are more likely than Republicans to support vaccination mandates. In this live Q&A, Robert Blendon, Richard L. Menschel Professor of Public Health and Professor of Health Policy and Political Analysis, Emeritus, and Joanne Kenen, Editor-at-Large, […]Read more >Similar articles >
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$20M awarded for scientific research to ensure health equity in preventing hypertension

  • Teams from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, NYU Grossman School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham and Wayne State University receive American Heart Association research grants to study high blood pressure prevention in underrepresented populations
  • DALLAS, July 29, 2021 — The American Heart Association, the world’s leading voluntary organization dedicated to a world of longer, healthier lives, has awarded $20 million in grants to five scientific research teams to find new solutions for preventing high blood pressure .
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FROM THE LABS: New COVID-19 vaccine formulation produces effective vaccine candidate

By Ana Rodríguez
  • “Our results showed producing the RBD recombinant protein using the yeast expression platform would meet the demand for vaccinating communities around the world,” said corresponding author Dr. Maria Elena Bottazzi, associate dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor and co-director of Texas Children’s Center for Vaccine Development.
  • “Working with rhesus macaques, we found 3M-052/Alum formulation produced a significant and superior overall immune response than alum alone, a licensed adjuvant,” said corresponding author Dr. Sudhir Kasturi, assistant professor in the Emory School of Medicine (SOM) Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and a research assistant professor in Yerkes’ Microbiology and Immunology (M&I) division and the Emory Vaccine Center.
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‘I might delete it’: users on the NHS Covid-19 app amid the ‘pingdemic’

By Jedidajah Otte
  • There were 43% fewer downloads of the NHS Covid-19 app in the week ending 30 June compared with the week ending 14 June, NHS data shows, while a record 689,313 people in England and Wales were contacted by the app and asked to self-isolate in the week to 12 July.
  • T he number of downloads of the NHS Covid-19 app has shrunk dramatically amid a “pingdemic” that is causing shortages of goods and workers, after former health secretary Jeremy Hunt warned last week that the government “risks losing social consent” for its test-and-trace programme if it does not allow fully vaccinated people to avoid isolation.
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Combined effects of masking and distance on aerosol exposure potential

By Joe Dangor
  • "We found the most important measure for reducing the risk of exposure to COVID-19 is to wear a mask," says Matthew Callstrom, M.D., Ph.D., chair of the department of radiology at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota.
  • In fact, published data from Mayo Clinic researchers have found that appropriate masking and physical separation reduces the exposure of individuals to respiratory droplets that spread the virus and a physical separation of 6 feet reduces particle counts to near baseline levels.
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To beat Covid, there’s a simple lesson – no one’s safe until everyone’s safe | WHO special envoys

By WHO special envoys
  • T he world is witnessing the emergence of more infectious variants of the Sars-CoV-2 virus, but a stuttering race to ensure equitable access to vaccines has seen a handful of countries streak ahead, immunising their own populations, leaving many of the world’s vulnerable people in their wake.
  • We have to accelerate along two tracks – one where governments and vaccine manufacturers support all WHO member states in their efforts to create vaccine manufacturing capacity and vaccinate their most vulnerable populations, and the other where individuals and communities maintain a steely focus on continuing essential public health measures to break transmission chains.
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The food news from China: a roundup

By Marion
  • U.S. imports of agricultural products from China totaled $3.6 billion in 2019, mainly from processed fruit and vegetables ($787 million); snack foods ($172 million); spices ($170 million); fresh vegetables ($136 million); and tea, including herbal tea ($131 million).
  • Although we export more agricultural goods to China than we import, our overall trade balance is to import about $300 billion a year more in products made in China than we export.
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Feel free to enjoy that coffee without worrying about your heart, new research says

By Allyson Chiu
  • In fact, analysis of self-reported coffee consumption appeared to indicate that those who drank more had a potentially lower risk of developing certain types of arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation, or AFib, which can cause blood clots, stroke and heart failure, among other health complications.
  • “There’s this quite pervasive conventional wisdom” that people who have or are at risk of arrhythmias, or abnormal heart rhythms, should avoid caffeine, said Gregory Marcus, a cardiologist and professor of medicine at the University of California at San Francisco.
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This Body: Black America, hope, trust and Covid vaccine trials – video

By Zac Manuel, Lauren Cargo, Marta Rodriguez Maleck, Ekaterina Ochagavia and Lindsay Poulton

This Body explores the relationship between Black Americans and the medical industry. Sydney Hall, a participant in a coronavirus vaccine trial, grapples with questions of trust and the hope of saving lives while her community grapples with the historical fallout of the Tuskegee syphilis experiment and contemporary abuses that continue to this day


Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Pool Chemical Safety Tips

By fenneld
  • Sure, you might be familiar with the smell of chlorine, but if the pool cleaning duties don’t fall on you, you’re probably not researching how pool chemicals could affect your health.
  • And while we put a lot of emphasis on wearing sunscreen and preventing drowning during water activities, you probably don’t think about the chemicals that go into pools.
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‘Pingdemic’: nearly 700,000 contacted by NHS Covid app in one week

By Heather Stewart Political editor

Official data for England and Wales shows 11.4% increase in number of people pinged in week to 12 July

A record 689,313 people in England and Wales were contacted by the NHS Covid app and asked to self-isolate in the week to 12 July, underlining the widespread disruption caused by surging case rates.

Official data from the app showed an 11.4% increase in the number of people “pinged” over the previous week.

Related: UK Covid live: 689,313 people in England and Wales pinged by NHS Covid app last week

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >
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For hackers, space is the final frontier

By Rebecca Heilweil
  • Intrusions and physical attacks on satellites, their connection systems, and the stations on Earth that control them have increased in recent years “probably due to the advancement of the tech being used and the space race,” according to Maher Yamout, a senior security researcher at the Russia-based cybersecurity company Kaspersky.
  • A hacker could try to access a satellite by targeting a company’s ground systems, and once inside, the attacker could manipulate the communications or controls, download unwanted software, or even tell the satellite to change its course, according to Iain Boyd, the director of the University of Colorado Boulder’s Center for National Security Initiatives.
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France attacks decision to keep it on England’s ‘amber plus’ list

By Aubrey Allegretti Political correspondent
  • Travellers from the remaining 26 EU member states, as well as Norway, Iceland and Switzerland, plus the European microstates, along with the US, will be able to skip quarantine if they can provide proof of inoculation when coming from an amber list country.
  • Given France is on the “amber plus” list, a special category on the traffic light system that grades countries according to their case, variant and vaccine rate, it is the only European country excluded from the change that will take effect from next Monday.
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Burnout and bias? Or medical gaslighting?

By Kara Wada, MD
  • Though once primarily informed by my mentors’ wisdom, I continue incorporating my experiences as both physician and autoimmune patient to guide my practice.
  • In its wake, the real question remains: how are we going to respond to ongoing changes and fight for the health of our patients and our colleagues?
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Vaccine passport plan intended to coax young to have jabs, says Raab

By Aubrey Allegretti Political correspondent
  • Raab said he had seen firsthand in France that when people were told they would need domestic vaccine passports to access certain venues and events there was a “big surge” in people coming forward for their jabs.
  • Nor did Johnson and Raab rule out university students needing to be double-vaccinated to live in halls of residence, and the Cabinet Office minister, Michael Gove, recently suggested it may be a requirement for fans at Premier League matches next season.
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Olympic Dream Dashed After Bike Crash and Nightmare Medical Bill Over $200K

By Samantha Young
  • One reason cited by WellRithms for Gaimon’s high bill: Lehigh Valley Hospital charged him $25,915 for a night in the intensive care unit and $29,785 for a night in the burn unit, according to an explanation of benefits sent to Gaimon by Health Net in January 2020.
  • In an email to KHN, Lehigh Valley Health Network spokesperson Brian Downs called the calculations by WellRithms “flawed,” and said it is not appropriate to use Medicare-based rates to determine medical costs because they “are not reflective of the actual cost incurred by a provider in rendering any specific medical service.”
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Japan urges young people to get jabs and stay in amid Tokyo Covid surge

By Justin McCurry in Tokyo and agencies
  • Health experts in Japan have warned that a recent surge in coronavirus cases in Tokyo, six days into the Olympics, could put hospitals under severe strain unless young people stop socialising at night and get vaccinated.
  • Tokyo reported 3,865 daily coronavirus cases on Thursday, up from 3,177 on Wednesday, as rising infections in the capital cast a shadow over the Olympics.
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Pfizer Court Fight Could Legalize Medicare Copays and Unleash ‘Gold Rush’ in Sales

By Jay Hancock, Kaiser Health News
  • By making prohibitively expensive medicine essentially free for patients, the company induced them to use Pfizer drugs even as the price of one of those medicines, covered by Medicare and Medicaid, soared 44% to $225,000 a year, the Justice Department alleged.
  • Three years ago, pharma giant Pfizer paid $24 million to settle federal allegations that it was paying kickbacks and inflating sales by reimbursing Medicare patients for out-of-pocket medication costs.
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‘It messes with you mentally’: the fear, swelling and stress of life with lymphoedema

By Elle Hunt
  • “Once people have it, it’s effectively a lifelong treatment,” says Prof Vaughan Keeley, a consultant physician in lymphoedema at the University Hospitals of Derby and Burton and one of the few such specialists in the UK.
  • Though the presentation and impact of lymphoedema varies, patients must typically follow a time-intensive daily programme of skincare, compression, movement and massage to reduce the swelling and the risk of infection.
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Mental health memes are everywhere – can they offer more than comic relief?

By Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett
  • “I think the only downside that can occur is when people reach out asking for help on how to change their situations, but I’m not a professional counselor,” she says.
  • You’re as likely to find references to PTSD on Instagram as you are on a medical website, and mental health memes in particular have been on the increase; in fact, their preponderance has been unmistakable during the pandemic.
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Covid Renews Interest in Radiation, but Docs Caution Against Pilgrimages to Radon-Filled Mines

By Katheryn Houghton
  • Twice a year, Brian Tichenor makes the 1,200-mile drive each way from his home in Kansas to a defunct uranium mine in Montana, where he takes an elevator 85 feet below the surface to sit amid radioactive radon gas to ease the pain from his chronic eye condition.
  • The travelers view the radon exposure as low-dose radiation therapy for a long list of health issues.
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Pharma firm Advanz fined after thyroid drug price hike of 6,000%

By Jillian Ambrose
  • An investigation by the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) found that the private-equity backed pharmaceutical company charged “excessive and unfair prices” for liothyronine tablets, which are used to treat thyroid hormone deficiency.
  • The UK’s competition watchdog has imposed fines of more than £100m on pharmaceutical company Advanzand its former private equity owners, after it was found to have inflated the price of thyroid tablets by up to 6,000% .
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Tokyo Olympics take center stage amid global uncertainty

By USC News
  • "Despite the reduced presence of spectators, personnel and related staff this year due to COVID protocols, terrorist threats remain," said Erroll Southers, the director of the Safe Communities Institute and of homegrown violent extremism studies at the USC Price School of Public Policy.
  • While people around the world feel inspired by the individual stories of the Olympians, it's impossible to ignore the public health risks of holding an event of this size and scale during a global pandemic -- not to mention other security concerns.
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The crushing mental toll of studying for the HSC in lockdown is sapping our motivation and hope | Max O’Connor

By Max O'Connor
  • Jubilation was quick to flood Instagram stories, as students revelled in the prospect of an extra two weeks of refining, improving or in some cases starting; but for many kids finishing their major works in lockdown seemed a near impossible task.
  • However, under stressful lockdown conditions, progressing and especially completing major works consisting of more practical components, such as visual arts, design and technology, music, textiles and drama, are much more difficult.
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American adolescents feeling worried, unmotivated and disconnected from school during the COVID-19 pandemic

By Leah M. Lessard, The Conversation
  • In fact, nearly 70% of the teens in our sample reported communicating less frequently with teachers since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • While our study did not collect academic achievement data, links between school stress and poorer academic outcomes highlight the importance of alleviating students’ academic worries in order to reduce potential pandemic-related learning loss .
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GP clinics at ‘breaking point’ and recovery plan is essential

By Rachel Hall
  • The Royal College of GPs is calling on the government to introduce an emergency rescue package to shore up general practice clinics after the pandemic, including recruiting 6,000 more GPs and 26,000 additional support staff, such as nurses and receptionists, by 2024 as well as reducing paperwork and investing in £1bn worth of improvements to infrastructure and technology.
  • Prof Martin Marshall, chair of the Royal College of GPs (RCGP), said: “We simply do not have enough GPs to meet the needs of a growing and ageing population, with increasingly complex conditions, on top of managing the fallout and work backlog from the pandemic.
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If Simone Biles were a doctor she would be vilified, not praised

By Arthur Lazarus, MD, MBA
  • The stress of practicing medicine has also filtered down to trainees – medical students and physician residents.
  • If one goes straight to the source – first-hand accounts of physicians and trainees who have suffered mental illnesses – the reaction of the medical establishment has at times been downright cruel, beginning with the medical education of students who were never taught to choose themselves over their patients or classmates.
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People who are willing to try new foods are perceived as more desirable and less sexually restricted

By Eric W. Dolan
  • In three additional studies, in which 323 participants viewed (fake) online dating profiles of opposite-sex individuals, Bradshaw and her colleagues found that those willing to try new foods were perceived as having had a greater number of past sexual partners and as being more open to uncommitted sexual relationships.
  • The researchers examined whether the willingness to try things in general (such as reading new books or listening to new music) would have a similar relationship to perceptions of sexual unrestrictedness.
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Motivation Depends on How the Brain Processes Fatigue

By Neuroscience News
  • “This work provides new ways of studying and understanding fatigue, its effects on the brain, and on why it can change some people’s motivation more than others” says Dr Matthew Apps, senior author of the study, based at the University of Birmingham’s Centre for Human Brain Health.
  • “We found that people’s willingness to exert effort fluctuated moment by moment, but gradually declined as they repeated a task over time,” says Tanja Müller, first author of the study, based at the University of Oxford.
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Improved Learning Processes Tied to Reduced Symptoms of Depression

By Neuroscience News
  • We hope that our work can be a bridge between behavioral clinicians and computational scientists to more precisely identify what causes depression and new ways to treat the illness,” said first author Vanessa Brown, a former doctoral student with Chiu in Virginia Tech’s Department of Psychology and who is now an assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh.
  • “Current medications and behavioral therapies are helpful, but for many people struggling with depression, existing treatments don’t work well,” said Pearl Chiu, an associate professor at the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute Computational Psychiatry Unit and the study’s corresponding author.
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X-Rays Can Control Neuron Function and Behavior

By Neuroscience News
  • Summary: A novel X-ray scintillator-based optogenetics technique allows researchers to control neural function deep within the brain and alter behavioral responses.
  • A group of neuroscientists and material scientists now reveal a novel X-ray and scintillator based-optogenetics technique that allows control of neural function deep in the brain without causing any damage.
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The Coronavirus Pandemic: The Delta Variant Surge

By Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
The highly infectious COVID-19 Delta variant is spurring global surges, sparking concerns among public health officials. In the U.S., more than 80 percent of new cases are from the Delta variant. What makes this variant so contagious? How protective are current vaccines? What’s the latest on practices such as masking and social distancing? Join Harvard Chan epidemiologist William Hanage and The World’s Elana Gordon for this online Q&A. Presented jointly with The World from PRX & GBH. […]Read more >Similar articles >

Wildfire smoke in New England underscores climate change-related health risks

By Karen Gail Feldscher
  • After smoke from wildfires in the western U.S. cast a dangerous haze over New England on July 26 and 27, experts spoke out about the growing health risks spurred by climate change, which has led to more frequent and intense fires in recent years.
  • Physicians quoted in a July 28, 2021, Boston Globe article said they’d been seeing an uptick in patients in respiratory distress since the smoke appeared in the region.
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New efforts to enhance pediatric resuscitation programs in Philadelphia

  • “This initiative will build upon many years of productive collaboration between our hospital and the American Heart Association to improve the quality of resuscitation practice and cardiac care dedicated exclusively to children,” said Madeline Bell, president and CEO of CHOP.
  • Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the American Heart Association have announced an enhanced collaboration to advance the next generation of pediatric emergency cardiovascular care and resuscitation practices.
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Augmented Reality Guided Spinal Chordoma Resection and Stabilization Surgery

By Johns Hopkins Medicine
Richard was diagnosed with a lumbar chordoma in the top part of his lower back, a tumor that is difficult to treat and that typically does not respond to chemotherapy or radiation therapy. New technology used by Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon Timothy Witham, M.D., offered a novel treatment option for Richard: augmented reality neuronavigation. After the first ever use of augmented reality technology to remove a lumbar chordoma at the L1 vertebral segment, Richard is back to work and able to enjoy time with his family. […]Read more >Similar articles >

CARES 2021 kick-off

By Johns Hopkins Medicine
The C.A.R.E.S Symposium provides opportunities for students who participated in a Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine pipeline program to share their summer research presentations to the Hopkins community, faculty, recruits from local colleges and universities, and network with high-achieving undergraduates. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Community input helps shape advisory board recommendations to enhance public safety at USC

By USC News
  • This report, published by the Department of Public Safety Community Advisory Board (CAB), makes recommendations that range from changing the response to nonviolent incidents to setting up an independent review board for DPS.
  • I look forward to working with the CAB co-chairs, students, faculty, staff and the surrounding community to continue to enhance the service DPS provides."
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How to Make Up Your Mind When the Glass Seems Half Empty?

By Neuroscience News
  • It is very difficult for us to see exactly where and how anxiety manifests in humans, but studies in primate brains have pointed to neurons in the ACC [anterior cingulate cortex] as being important in these decision-making processes.”
  • Neuroscientists at Kyoto University’s Institute for Advanced Study of Human Biology (WPI-ASHBi) have connected some of the dots to reveal the brain networks that give anxiety influence over decisions.
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Fruit Compound May Have Potential to Prevent and Treat Parkinson’s Disease

By Neuroscience News
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have added to evidence that the compound farnesol, found naturally in herbs, and berries and other fruits, prevents and reverses brain damage linked to Parkinson’s disease in mouse studies.
  • Summary: Farnesol, a naturally occurring compound found in berries and other fruits, prevents the loss of dopamine-producing neurons and reverses Parkinson’s associated damage to the brain in mouse models.
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Discovery Points to Ketamine’s Long-Term Antidepressant Effects

By Neuroscience News
  • Building on recent research confirming how ketamine induces rapid antidepressant action, Professor of Pharmacology Lisa Monteggia and her collaborators show how the molecular mechanism of the gene MeCP2 and associated synaptic adaptability are critical to the long-term antidepressant effects of ketamine.
  • While MeCP2 has been shown to be important for typical antidepressants, this research indicates that, in cooperation with ketamine’s initial target, the gene is important for long-term antidepressant action, Monteggia said.
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States send mixed signals on COVID-19 mask recommendations

By ssoucher
  • After the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced yesterday new guidance suggesting mask use for vaccinated Americans in areas with high COVID-19 transmission, several states have signaled they will either follow or ignore the agency's recommendations — the latest sign the pandemic has become a political issue in the United States.
  • The CDC's guidelines make it clear it is up to state and local officials to determine when and if mask use is appropriate based on a series of metrics, which take into account case rates and vaccine coverage.
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Spacing math practice across multiple sessions improves students’ test scores and helps them accurately judge their learning

By Beth Ellwood
  • The researchers proposed that practicing the material over spaced out sessions should remind students that they are susceptible to forgetting information over time, thus preventing overconfidence and improving the accuracy of their test predictions.
  • Emeny and his team wanted to explore this effect among Grade 7 math students, while also investigating how spaced practice might affect students’ predictions of their test scores.
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Americas and Asia cases drive latest weekly COVID rise

By Lisa Schnirring
  • With another steady increase in cases last week, the world is now adding more than 500,000 million cases a day, with the more transmissible Delta (B1617.2) SARS-CoV-2 variant now in 132 of the world's 197 countries, the World Health Organization (WHO) said yesterday in its latest weekly update on the pandemic.
  • Japan today also reported a new single-day high with 9,576 cases, which includes nearly 3,200 from Tokyo, which is currently hosting the summer Olympic Games.
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Lack of quarantine at England’s borders ‘risks havoc of Covid variants’

By Aubrey Allegretti
  • Opening England’s borders to let millions of people arriving from the US and Europe avoid quarantine could risk importations of new Covid variants that might wreak havoc with unlocking domestic restrictions, ministers have been warned.
  • After the government announced plans to recognise vaccination status if people were fully jabbed in the US and most of Europe, Labour said it could make the country more susceptible to being overwhelmed by another Delta-like variant.
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COVID-19 Scan for Jul 28, 2021

By dall0050
  • Forty percent of 290 COVID-19 survivors completing an Emory University survey 1 to 6 months after release from the hospital reported lingering symptoms such as fatigue, shortness of breath on exertion, and "mental fog."
  • The study, published yesterday in Open Forum Infectious Diseases, involved an emailed survey about persistent COVID-19 symptoms, acute illness severity, and quality of life to better quantify and characterize "long COVID."
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Genetic engineering test with mosquitoes ‘may be game changer’ in eliminating malaria

By Linda Geddes
  • This involved releasing genetically modified, sterile, male mosquitoes into the wild, to test whether they could survive, and continue to be tracked – an essential step towards eventual field trials of gene-drive organisms, which have not yet taken place.
  • As well as bringing fresh hope in the fight against one of the world’s biggest killers, the study lays the foundations for further trials of gene-drive technology which could mean self-destroying mosquitoes being released into the wild within 10 years.
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Educators Need to Break the Academic Bias Against Young Men of Color

By USC News
  • Something about the excitement in the teacher's voice as they talked about the culture of high expectations, academic opportunities, low student-to-teacher ratios and more resources to prepare for a career after high school graduation resonated with me.
  • The low high school graduation rate for boys of color is due not to a lack of academic talent but rather to hiccups in equal educational opportunities .
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Mental illness tied to higher risk of COVID hospital care, death

By Jim Wappes
  • The higher rate of severe COVID-19 "suggests that other factors lead to this health inequity in patients with mental health disorders, including several factors such as barriers to access to care, social determinants of health, immunological disturbances, and the effects of psychotropic drugs," the study authors wrote.
  • "These findings suggest that patients with COVID-19 and mental health disorders should be targeted as a high-risk population for severe forms of COVID-19, requiring enhanced preventive and disease management strategies," the authors wrote, adding that future research should delve into risk evaluation for COVID-19 patients with each type of mental illness.
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Masks Give Vaccines a Better Fighting Chance

By Katherine J. Wu
  • Masks, after all, are reemerging in response to the fast-changing conditions around us—offering another layer of protection at a time when we need it most, in much the same way we seek out umbrellas when it rains, sunscreen when it’s sunny, and better security systems when our neighborhood crime rates tick up.
  • Yesterday, the agency pivoted back, recommending that even fully vaccinated people wear masks under certain high-risk circumstances, including in public indoor spaces in parts of the country where the virus is surging, Director Rochelle Walensky said in a press briefing.
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Revealed: £6bn NHS glove contract shows rocketing cost of PPE

By Heather Stewart Political editor
  • The Department of Health and Social Care has set aside up to £6bn to spend on disposable gloves over the next two years, underlining the huge expense of continuing to supply the NHS with personal protective equipment.
  • If you are about to authorise £6bn in new spending on medical gloves over the next two years, surely now is finally the time to put proper controls alongside those contracts and ensure they are not going to suppliers in Malaysia that use slave labour.”
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‘I’m excited to see my parents’: Guardian readers on travel-rule easing

By Jedidajah Otte
  • Ministers have announced that fully vaccinated travellers living in the EU and the US will no longer have to quarantine for 10 days upon arrival in England from an amber country.
  • Neil, 41, however, a Briton living in Vienna, Austria, who is due to fly to Northern Ireland next week with his wife and four children to visit his parents, relief is yet to come.
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The Apgar Olympics: The race is on

By Russell Johnson, MD
  • Little Baby B (it’s a girl!) is now in the resident’s hands, but the only crying I hear is from Baby Boy A, who just scored another nine on the five-minute Apgar.
  • While the obstetrics resident works on extracting little Baby B from the womb, I work on calculating Baby Boy A’s first Apgar score, a composite of the annoyingly difficult to remember five characteristics of newborns used to assess their health at birth.
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Join a Johns Hopkins Medicine Patient and Family Advisory Council!

By Johns Hopkins Medicine
At Johns Hopkins Medicine, we are committed to partnering with current and former patients, families, and caregivers to improve the healthcare experience for all. We invite you to share your thoughts and experiences by becoming a member of a Patient and Family Advisory Council!#PatientFamailyAdvisoryConcil #JohnsHopkinsLearn more: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/pfac […]Read more >Similar articles >

Higher rates of firearm licensure linked with higher blood lead levels in children

By Karen Gail Feldscher
  • Young children living in Massachusetts communities with higher rates of firearm licensure were significantly more likely to have dangerously high levels of lead in their blood compared to children living in communities with fewer gun licenses, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
  • The study looked at data on firearm licensure—the best available proxy for firearm ownership and use—from 351 Massachusetts sub-counties from the state’s Department of Criminal Justice Information Services, along with data on pediatric blood lead levels from the state’s Bureau of Environmental Health.
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NHS deputy expected to replace Simon Stevens as head

By Rajeev Syal
  • Stevens stands down at the end of this week after seven years in the job and his successor, an NHS veteran, will be given the job of overseeing a huge backlog of routine care after the pandemic has left staff exhausted.
  • Amanda Pritchard is expected to be confirmed as the NHS chief executive in a sign the government is seeking continuity as the health service attempts to recover from the coronavirus pandemic.
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La terapia del lenguaje suele ayudar a personas con afección del habla por un accidente cerebrovascular

By Sharon Theimer
ESTIMADA MAYO CLINIC: Hace seis meses, mi madre sufrió un accidente cerebrovascular y aunque ha recuperado la movilidad hasta un nivel casi normal, todavía tiene dificultad para comunicarse. Puede leer y entender cuando los demás hablan, pero suele batallar para encontrar las palabras que quiere decir. Pese a la frustración que siente, se rehúsa a intentar la terapia del lenguaje porque dice que no servirá. ¿Puede la terapia del lenguaje ayudar a alguien como mi madre? RESPUESTA: La eficacia de la terapia del lenguaje con las personas que tienen dificultad para comunicarse después de haber sufrido un accidente cerebrovascular depende de […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Mayo Clinic scientists advance breast, ovarian cancer research with cryo-electron microscopy

By Sara Tiner
  • Using advanced imaging technology, Mayo Clinic scientists have provided an unprecedented understanding of the BRCA1-BARD1 protein complex, which is often mutated in patients with breast or ovarian cancer.
  • It has direct relevance to cancer because hundreds of mutations in the BRCA1 and BARD1 genes have been identified in cancer patients," says Georges Mer, Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic structural biologist and biochemist who is the lead author of the paper.
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A Very Scientific Reason to Swab a Cat’s Cheek

By Katherine J. Wu
  • “Other than primates, the cat-human comparison is one of the closest you can get,” with respect to genome organization, Leslie Lyons, an expert in cat genetics at the University of Missouri, told me.
  • But more investment in feline genomics could pave the way for precision medicine in cats, wherein vets assess genetic risk for different diseases and intervene as early as possible, giving them “a jump on diagnostics,” Elinor Karlsson, a vertebrate genomics expert at the Broad Institute, told me.
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Don’t dwell on the US life expectancy drop. Worry about the long-term trend.

By Michael Bader
  • As a demographer, I can assure you that’s not what the CDC is saying, and the Covid-19 dip in life expectancy is less surprising and less important than many people might think.
  • Life expectancy, the CDC report says, “represents the average number of years a group of infants would live if they were to experience throughout life the age-specific death rates prevailing during a specified period .”
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The Coronavirus Pandemic: Sub-Saharan Africa’s Deepening Crisis

By Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
With the Delta variant fueling numbers of new coronavirus cases and deaths in Africa, global health experts are increasingly concerned about the impacts of the pandemic on the continent. Despite early efforts to curb the spread of COVID-19, African leaders are now coping with a “third wave,” complicated by limited vaccination accessibility and resources. A series of studies by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and colleagues from the Africa Research, Implementation Science and Education (ARISE) Network are spotlighting the pandemic’s health and socioeconomic impacts specifically in sub-Saharan Africa. Senior author […]Read more >Similar articles >
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I’m a Pandemic Dad Who’s Been Covering COVID-19. I Don’t Know How to Think About the Risk Anymore

By Alex Fitzpatrick
  • Now, with the Delta variant fueling a potential fourth wave while only half the country is vaccinated and many people are acting as if the pandemic is over, it’s harder than ever to gauge the risk to myself and, more importantly, my nearly two-year-old son.
  • My purely anecdotal findings suggest that parents of slightly older kids—kids who became actualized human beings with likes, dislikes and aptitudes well before COVID-19 sent everything sideways—are generally a little more willing to accept the (again, very low) risk the virus poses to their children; they have already learned the inevitable lesson that you can’t protect your kids from everything scary forever.
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Downing Street Covid briefings excluded deaf BSL users, judge finds

By Haroon Siddique Legal affairs correspondent
  • Downing Street’s failure to provide British Sign Language interpreters during live Covid briefings was discriminatory and breached equality legislation, a high court judge has ruled.
  • In his written judgment on Wednesday, Mr Justice Fordham said: “Without BSL interpretation there was a clear barrier, for a vulnerable and marginalised group, undermining accessibility of information.
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CDC updates indoor mask guidance

By Molly Walker
  • Walensky said that because of the potential for “forward transmission” in vaccinated people, CDC is updating its guidance to recommend that fully vaccinated people wear masks in areas with high or substantial transmission.
  • Due to emerging science about transmission in vaccinated people, the CDC now recommends all teachers and students wear masks in school, and that people living in COVID-19 hotspots, or areas of the country with large outbreaks, wear masks indoors, CDC officials said on Tuesday.
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Unraveling the Mysterious Mutations That Make Delta the Most Transmissible Covid Virus Yet

By Liz Szabo, Kaiser Health News
  • Scientists believe one of the most important areas of the spike is the receptor-binding domain, the specific part of the protein that allows the virus to latch onto a receptor on the surface of our cells, said Vaughn Cooper, a professor of microbiology and molecular genetics at the University of Pittsburgh.
  • Scientists have the best understanding of mutations on the so-called spike protein — which sticks out from the surface of the virus like a club — and which have been studied the most intensely because of its serious ramifications, Rasmussen said.
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Business leaders unveil strategic roadmap to improve health equity in the workplace

  • DALLAS, July 28, 2021 —The American Heart Association, the world's leading nonprofit organization focused on heart and brain health for all, today announced a new report that provides employers with a roadmap for creating an environment that supports and encourages equitable health and well-being.
  • The workplace is a significant platform to meet people where they are and influence positive and lasting change for employees everywhere,” said Nancy Brown, CEO of the American Heart Association.
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Mandate the vaccine, not masks

By German Lopez
  • With the rise of the delta variant and a rapid increase in Covid-19 cases, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is calling on vaccinated people to wear masks indoors again in places where the virus is quickly spreading.
  • Local and state governments could require vaccines for their employees, health care workers, schools, and public spaces, from restaurants to museums.
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West Suffolk hospital chief resigns prior to bullying claims review

By Matthew Weaver
  • Dunn was urged by the Royal College of Anaesthetists to end the “toxic management culture” after the Guardian revealed the trust had demanded fingerprint samples of senior clinicians in the hunt for a whistleblower who had tipped off a family about a potentially botched operation.
  • The chief executive at Matt Hancock’s local hospital is to step down before the publication of a delayed review into bullying allegations involving an unprecedented demand for fingerprints from senior clinicians first revealed by the Guardian.
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What to Know About Breakthrough COVID-19 Cases

By gilmerm
  • “The numbers are so low that the CDC is now primarily focusing on those breakthrough cases that result in hospitalization or death,” says Dr. Gordon.
  • In recent weeks, as cases of the delta variant have increased dramatically in the United States, there’s been talk about “breakthrough” COVID-19 cases but not as much discussion about what these cases actually mean.
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Sign-Up Window for Free COBRA Coverage for Many Laid-Off Workers Closes This Week

By Michelle Andrews
  • Under federal rules, she should have been sent a notice by May 31 informing her about the subsidy, which is generally available to people who were involuntarily laid off or whose hours were reduced and who are eligible for continued employer coverage under COBRA.
  • Typically, laid-off workers pick up the total cost of premiums under COBRA, but her company paid roughly 75% of the expense for the first six months, leaving de Pompignan with a $659 monthly bill for the family plan covering her, her husband and their 9-year-old son.
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Science Saturday: How geologic rock formations inform novel treatments for kidney stones

Human kidney stones are at least as old as the Giza pyramids. The oldest known kidney stone was found in Egyptian burial satin from 4400 B.C. In 2020, Mayo Clinic processed and analyzed some 90,000 kidney stones from all over the world. That number increases each year, reflecting a global uptick in kidney stone disease. But new research has unlocked how kidney stones actually form, which could be the key to treating or even eliminating […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Hearts from donors who used illicit drugs or overdosed safe for transplant, cuts wait time

  • DALLAS, July 28, 2021 — Survival rates after a heart transplant are unaffected if the organ donor had used illicit drugs or died due to an overdose, a fact that is increasing the availability of hearts due to the rise in drug overdose deaths in the U.S., according to two new unrelated research studies published today in two of the American Heart Association’s scientific journals.
  • In the largest study to-date examining illicit drug use of heart transplant donors, and the only analysis to examine the toxicology data of donors obtained at hospital admission, Baran and colleagues reviewed nationwide information from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) database.
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Women Say California Insurer Makes It Too Hard to Get Drug for Postpartum Depression

By April Dembosky, KQED
  • At KP, a patient’s doctor determines whether a medication is appropriate, not the health plan, and the criteria doctors use are recommendations, not requirements or prerequisites that patients need to “exhaust,” said Dr. Maria Koshy, KP’s chair of psychiatry for Northern California.
  • Under a California state law that took effect this January, health plans must conform to generally accepted standards of care, including scientific literature and expert consensus, when making decisions about mental health treatment.
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Johnson rejects Gove remark that Covid vaccine refusers are ‘selfish’

By Peter Walker Political correspondent
  • Asked if he supported the idea, Johnson said only: “I think it’s a very positive thing to do to get a vaccine.”
  • Johnson also sounded notably less keen than Gove on the idea of domestic Covid certification, such as the plan, announced by the prime minister last week, that from late September anyone going to a nightclub or similarly packed venue would need to prove they had been double-vaccinated, something strongly opposed by a number of Tory MPs.
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Consumer Health: Are you ready to add something new to your fitness routine?

If you know exercise is important and you're making time for awell-rounded fitness routine, good for you! But you may become bored with the same routine day after day. And if you're bored, you may be more apt to lose interest after a while. If it's time to add a new spark to your fitness routine, here are three ideas to consider: Aquatic exerciseSwimming pools are not just for swimming laps.Aquatic fitnessoptions also include aerobics […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Cautious welcome for rapid antigen tests to control Sydney Covid outbreak, despite reliability concerns

By Michael McGowan
  • As NSW recorded 177 cases of Covid-19 and extended its lockdown for another four weeks on Wednesday, the premier, Gladys Berejiklian, indicated that rapid antigen testing was likely to be used in schools by the middle of August to allow year 12 students to begin returning to classrooms before end-of-year exams.
  • Reviews of rapid Covid-19 tests in Australia have found markedly different results in their effectiveness, but experts say the New South Wales government’s decision to employ them in schools and essential workplaces will help to control the virus.
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Mayo Clinic announces next phase of vaccination requirements for COVID-19

Guided by its values and deep commitment to patients, Mayo Clinic is requiring all employees to be fully vaccinated for COVID-19 or complete a declination process by Sept. 17. "We are proud of our staff's high vaccination rates and are grateful that the vast majority have embraced the opportunity to get vaccinated," says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., Mayo Clinic's president and CEO. "Our patients expect to be safe when they come to Mayo Clinic, and we […]Read more >Similar articles >

COVID-19 vaccine urgency as delta variant continues to spread

Viruses constantly change through mutation, and new variants of viruses are expected to occur. Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 have been documented, including a highly transmittable form ofCOVID-19known as the deltavariant. The delta variant, which was first seen in December 2020 in India, is spreading globally. It's more contagious than the previous strains that have been detected in the U.S. It's also causing more severe illness.Dr. Melanie Swift, co-chair of Mayo Clinic's […]Read more >Similar articles >

Emergency department visits related to opioid overdoses up significantly during COVID-19 pandemic

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Emergency department visit rates because of an opioid overdose increased by 28.5% across the U.S. in 2020, compared to 2018 and 2019, recent Mayo Clinic research finds. Emergency visits overall decreased by 14% last year, while visits because of an opioid overdose increased by 10.5%. The result: Opioid overdoses were responsible for 0.32 out of 100 visits, or 1 in every 313 visits, which is up from 0.25, or 1 in every […]Read more >Similar articles >

Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast: Making progress in treating glioblastoma

When it comes to malignant tumors in the brain and spinal cord, glioblastoma is the most common. Glioblastoma is an aggressive form of cancer that forms from cells called astrocytes in the brain or the spinal cord. Glioblastoma can occur at any age, but it's more common in older adults. It can cause worsening headaches, nausea, vomiting and seizures. Glioblastoma can be difficult to treat. Current treatments include surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, but thanks to […]Read more >Similar articles >

Sharing Mayo Clinic: Scarlett is running and smiling after surgery to correct pectus excavatum

When Sara Hutchins noticed an indent in her daughter Scarlett’s chest, she immediately recognized the cause:pectus excavatum, a condition that causes the breast bone to sink into the chest. “My father had the same condition,” Sara says. “He’d had surgery to correct it but was never satisfied with his results.” Sara wanted to ensure that if Scarlett had surgery, she’d like what she saw in the mirror afterward. “I did a lot of research,” Sara […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Are Covid jabs ‘Trump vaccines’? No, but I’ll call them that if it means people will take them

By Arwa Mahdawi
  • If “the left truly care about increasing the vaccination rate … they should admit they were wrong to cast doubt on Operation Warp Speed and give President Trump and his team the credit they are due,” Sanders wrote.
  • She seems to want to change that: on Sunday, she published a column explaining her reasons for getting “the Trump vaccine” and arguing that Covid vaccines are safe and effective.
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Graphic depictions of an integrative model of mind

By mdbownds@wisc.edu (Deric Bownds)
  • And yet, this basic idea can explain how each meditation technique uniquely deconstructs the minds tendency to project the past onto the present, how certain insights may arise, the nature of hierarchical self-processing, and the plasticity of the human mind.
  • We have taken on the daunting task of providing a theory for understanding the effects of meditation within the predictive processing framework.
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How to support someone going through a mentally tough time

By Allyson Chiu
  • It’s also important to figure out where a person is in their decision-making process about how to handle their mental health issue, Nguyen said, which can then guide how you provide support.
  • Biles’s very public decision offers an opportunity to learn about the right and wrong ways to support someone — whether they’re an Olympian or not — who is going through a difficult time mentally or emotionally.
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The incredible true story of the cancer patient who didn’t have cancer | Ranjana Srivastava

By Ranjana Srivastava
  • The patient had received a test founded on a clever principle – although at the time many clinicians had barely heard of circulating tumour cells, which are microscopic fragments of cancer shed into the bloodstream.
  • The latest news of circulating tumour cells having resurfaced and being promoted as a validated test has oncologists dismayed over yet another unapproved offer dangled in front of patients in the guise of hope.
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Simone Biles’ Olympic Team Final Withdrawal Could Help Athletes Put Their Mental Health First

By Alice Park
  • During the Olympic Trials in June, the normally precise and consistent Biles made a string of uncharacteristic errors on the second day of competition, which appeared to have spilled over to the qualification round in Tokyo, which determines which eight teams will move on to the team event, and which athletes will compete in the all-around competition and the event finals.
  • Biles said she had never felt as unsettled about a competition as she did before the team final, and earlier in the day was shaking and unable to nap like she normally does before a big meet.
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Pediatrics Grand Rounds | May 24, 2021

By Johns Hopkins Medicine
Recorded Grand Rounds from Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. Please note that the window for earning CME credit has expired. More information on Pediatric Grand Rounds can be found at https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/johns-hopkinschildrens-center/healthcare-professionals/education/grand-rounds/index.html #JohnsHopkinsChildrensCenter #GrandRounds #pediatrics […]Read more >Similar articles >

Pediatrics Grand Rounds | December 14, 2020

By Johns Hopkins Medicine
Recorded Grand Rounds from Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. Please note that the window for earning CME credit has expired. More information on Pediatric Grand Rounds can be found at https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/johns-hopkins-childrens-center/healthcare-professionals/education/grand-rounds/index.html #JohnsHopkinsChildrensCenter #GrandRounds #pediatrics […]Read more >Similar articles >

Pediatrics Grand Rounds | May 10, 2021

By Johns Hopkins Medicine
Recorded Grand Rounds from Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. Please note that the window for earning CME credit has expired. More information on Pediatric Grand Rounds can be found at https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/johns-hopkins-childrens-center/healthcare-professionals/education/grand-rounds/index.html #JohnsHopkinsChildrensCenter #GrandRounds #pediatrics […]Read more >Similar articles >
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A third of middle-aged UK adults have at least two chronic health issues – study

By Rachel Hall
  • More than one in three middle-aged British adults are suffering from at least two chronic health conditions, including recurrent back problems, poor mental health, high blood pressure, diabetes and high-risk drinking, according to research that warned that health in midlife is on the decline.
  • One third (34%) of the adults surveyed had multiple chronic health problems, with 26% engaged in high-risk drinking, while 21% reported recurrent back issues, and 19% experienced mental health problems.
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Pediatrics Grand Rounds | May 3, 2021

By Johns Hopkins Medicine
Recorded Grand Rounds from Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. Please note that the window for earning CME credit has expired. More information on Pediatric Grand Rounds can be found at https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/johns-hopkins-childrens-center/healthcare-professionals/education/grand-rounds/index.html #JohnsHopkinsChildrensCenter #GrandRounds #pediatrics […]Read more >Similar articles >

Grand Rounds 2021-05-17 Trim_Trim

By Johns Hopkins Medicine
Recorded Grand Rounds from Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. Please note that the window for earning CME credit has expired. More information on Pediatric Grand Rounds can be found at https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/johns-hopkins-childrens-center/healthcare-professionals/education/grand-rounds/index.html #JohnsHopkinsChildrensCenter #GrandRounds #pediatrics […]Read more >Similar articles >

Pediatrics Grand Rounds | March 29, 2021

By Johns Hopkins Medicine
Recorded Grand Rounds from Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. Please note that the window for earning CME credit has expired. More information on Pediatric Grand Rounds can be found at https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/johns-hopkins-childrens-center/healthcare-professionals/education/grand-rounds/index.html #JohnsHopkinsChildrensCenter #GrandRounds #pediatrics […]Read more >Similar articles >

A Video Message of Appreciation for the 2021–2022 U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals Rankings

By Johns Hopkins Medicine
The Johns Hopkins Hospital has once again been recognized as a top hospital on U.S. News & World Report’s Best Hospitals list for 2021–22, ranking #4 in the nation and #1 in Maryland. Watch the video to hear Johns Hopkins Hospital President Redonda Miller share a message of appreciation for staff members and their long-standing commitment to excellence — every moment of every day of every year. Learn more at https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/usnews. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Many Parents Still Believe Boys Are Better, More Competitive at Sports Than Girls

By Neuroscience News
  • The study found that gender stereotypes and the dearth of female coaches as role models are among the biggest reasons that girls quit or don’t participate in sports, Veliz said.
  • While the study did not specifically look at the sexualization of girls in sports, Veliz said these stereotypes can lead to the type of sexualization of female athletes seen in the Olympic uniform controversy, where the Norwegian women’s beach handball team was fined for refusing to play in skimpy, mandated bikini outfits.
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Can You Overdose on Marijuana?

By Joshua Rapp Learn
  • While the natural form of marijuana may not be toxic enough to cause overdose, Shad says newer synthetic forms of THC currently available on the illegal market like Spice or K2 are a different story.
  • THC is considered a partial agonist, which means it isn’t actually very toxic, especially compared with more dangerous drugs like opiates or cocaine that can be toxic or lethal at high doses.
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Amid Delta, CDC strengthens COVID-19 mask guidance

By Jim Wappes
  • But new data on breakthrough infections in vaccinated Americans caused by the Delta (B1617.2) variant shows in rare cases, vaccinated people can transmit the virus, necessitating mask use in some instances.
  • Though breakthrough infections can occur in vaccinated Americans, Walensky emphasized that all three vaccines in use in the United States are very effective in preventing severe illness and death from the Delta variant.
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Premature Birth Associated With Profound Reduction in Brain Connections

By Neuroscience News
  • One of the senior researchers Dr Dafnis Batallé said it was found premature birth was associated with a profound reduction in connectivity between many brain regions, and with a reconfiguration of the organisation of functional brain networks.
  • “ The Developing Human Connectome Project: typical and disrupted perinatal functional connectivity ” by Dafnis Battale et al.
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20-year Mayo Clinic study suggests return to play is manageable for athletes with most genetic heart diseases

By Terri Malloy
  • But a 20-year study at Mayo Clinic following such athletes who were allowed to return to play suggests that the risks can be managed through a shared decision-making process.
  • "When I joined Mayo Clinic's staff in 2000, we rejected the prevailing approach to athletes with genetic heart diseases that was embraced throughout the world: 'If in doubt, kick them out.' After seeing the demoralizing and destructive effects of disqualification on athletes, we decided to embrace a shared and informed decision-making process," says Dr. Ackerman.
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Three Brain Responses Linked to Successful Weight Loss Surgery

By Neuroscience News
  • The researchers believe that these changes in brain activity after weight loss surgery can help explain why people who undergo this type of treatment have successful and long term weight loss, in comparison with those who have followed a very low calorie diet, where very often there is a regain of weight.
  • The researchers wanted to investigate changes in brain activity and weight responses following surgery or a very low calorie diet (VLCD) in people with obesity and type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes.
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