Oct 26, 2020

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How’d we get so choosy about friendships late in life? Ask the chimps

Research NewsHow’d we get so choosy about friendships late in life? Ask the chimps Nonhuman animals select whom they socialize with during aging Three male chimps groom together in a chain. Likizo grooms Big Brown, who grooms Lanjo. October 26, 2020 When humans age, we tend to favor small circles of meaningful, already established friendships rather than seeking new ones. People are also more likely to lean toward positive relationships rather than those that bring tension or conflict. No new friends, and no drama. These behaviors were thought to be unique to humans, but it turns out that chimpanzees, some of our closest living […]Read full article >

How rain can move mountains

Research NewsHow rain can move mountains Study reveals how even the mightiest of mountain ranges bends to raindrops The Bhutan Himalaya’s rainfall ranges from 0.7 to 6 meters per year October 26, 2020 Scientists have long thought that rainfall has a dramatic effect on the evolution of mountain landscapes, but the reasons have been elusive. The concept has never been quantitatively demonstrated until now, thanks to a new technique that captures precisely how even the mightiest of mountain ranges — the Himalayas — bends to the will of raindrops. The U.S. National Science Foundation-funded research, published in Science […]Read full article >

Declines in shellfish species on rocky seashores match climate-driven changes

Research NewsDeclines in shellfish species on rocky seashores match climate-driven changes Two decades of data document a dwindling of mussels, barnacles and snails A new study documents the decline of intertidal species on Swan’s Island in the Gulf of Maine. October 26, 2020 The waters of the Gulf of Maine are warming faster than oceans almost anywhere on Earth. As the level of carbon dioxide rises in the atmosphere, it’s absorbed by the sea, causing pH levels to fall. Ocean acidification makes it difficult for shellfish to thicken their shells –their primary defense against predators. In a U.S. National Science […]Read full article >

All-terrain microrobot flips through a live colon

Research NewsAll-terrain microrobot flips through a live colon Robot as tiny as a few human hairs can travel throughout a colon The microrobot can be seen just to the right of the “U” in United States on this U.S. penny. October 23, 2020 A rectangular robot as tiny as a few human hairs can travel throughout a colon by doing back flips, Purdue University engineers have demonstrated in live animal models. Why the back flips? Because the goal is to use these robots to transport drugs in humans, whose colons and other organs have rough terrain. Side flips work, too. Why a back-flipping robot to transport drugs? Getting a drug […]Read full article >
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Scientists show jet lag impairs immune response in mice

Research NewsScientists show jet lag impairs immune response in mice Chronic jet lag creates favorable cancer conditions in experimental models Chronic jet lag creates favorable cancer conditions in experimental models. October 22, 2020 Imagine you’ve just arrived in Paris. Your body thinks it should be midnight — a restorative time when your cells typically proofread DNA, organize and store energy, and perform other essential chores — but, instead, the sun is up and you’re awake. On a molecular level, your cells are stressed, trying to catch up to new environmental conditions. Shiftwork and experimental models of […]Read full article >