Jan 16, 2022

Select Page

News from all over | Updated hourly

Post image

Lakota woman promotes healing power with nature’s medicines

  • “My uncle Neil started teaching me about (healing plants) when we were pretty little because it was like, you know, as soon as the sun comes up, you go outside and play or you help do chores all day,” said Schnitker.
  • When she became an adult, Schnitker said her great-grandmother explained the role of medicinal plants in traditional Lakota culture.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

2022 Legislative session preview

By Santa Fe New Mexican
2022 Legislative session preview

Budget? What budget?

Though 30-day sessions are specifically designed for lawmakers to create and approve a financial blueprint for the next fiscal year, the state’s growing crime problem, public education woes and continuing efforts to battle the pandemic likely will take center stage when the New Mexico Legislature goes into action Tuesday afternoon.

With more than $1 billion in new revenue, plus additional federal pandemic relief funds to distribute, the 2022 session won’t be a battle over crumbs, but more likely a tug-of-war of ideas and ideals as Gov.

Continue reading 2022 Legislative session preview at The NM Political Report.

[…]Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

NMED pushes for funding for climate bureau

By Hannah Grover
  • Ben Shelton, the political and legislative director for Conservation Voters New Mexico, and Brittany Fallon, policy director for New Mexico Wild, said the LFC budget focuses more on one-time expenditures while the governor’s budget includes more recurring investments into areas like the environment and climate change.
  • In contrast, the LFC has proposed between $200,000 and $400,000, which would support three to seven full time positions depending on what happens with the Hydrogen Hub Act and clean fuel standards.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Ferriabough Bolling: Keeping the dream alive this MLK day

By Joyce Ferriabough Bolling
  • While it’s a new day thanks in huge measure to Dr. King’s efforts, I believe he would see through the attempts to water down and gut the intention of the voting rights bill and other not-so-covert attempts to diminish our hard-fought gains.
  • Today as we celebrate the anniversary of the birth of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., a man revered the world over, I try to imagine how he might feel about the erosion and suppression of voting rights that he fought so hard for at ground zero.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

To the editor: ‘Citizens United’ 12 years old

The Citizens United decision of January, 2010 removed restrictions on election spending by corporations and political action committees, leading the way to unlimited and hidden money in elections and policy decisions. This decision led to 12 years of rampant political corruption. We in Ohio have experienced first-hand the dire consequences of enormous amounts of dark money in legislative campaigns and decisions. […]Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Letters to the editor

  • As I read both the news story and the Boston Herald editorial (“State’s vaccine passport is not a mandate,” Jan. 11), I think the Baker administration seems to want it both ways.
  • Stephen Moore purports to support unions and union workers, but only in the context of those jobs that help perpetuate our fossil fuel-based economy.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Stage set for Minnesota Legislature redistricting debate

By Alex Derosier
  • The Republican proposal for new Congressional districts expands the boundaries of the 2nd District, an area south of the Twin Cities represented by Democrat Angie Craig, to include conservative rural counties.
  • Both Democrats and Republicans in the Minnesota Legislature have released redistricting proposals as the Feb. 15 deadline to approve the state’s new legislative and Congressional districts approaches.
Read more >Similar articles >

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson Battles for Survival as ‘Partygate’ Engulfs Conservatives

By Andrew Atkinson / Bloomberg
  • Amid warnings that Johnson has one last chance to save his leadership, Conservative Chair Oliver Dowden said the “contrite” prime minister is committed to tackling the “underlying culture” at Downing Street.
  • Boris Johnson faces another bruising week, with his future as U.K. prime minister in the balance amid a furious public backlash over rule-breaking parties at his Downing Street office.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Yellowjackets Showrunners Break Down That Haunting Season Finale

By Hillary Busis
  • Yellowjackets showrunners Ashley Lyle, Bart Nickerson, and Jonathan Lisco have a confession: They never meant to make you believe Jackie got out of the woods, even before we watched her die in the show’s first season finale.
  • “To our minds, in that scene, we've made very clear that Jackie died,” Lyle says, referring to the awkward episode six brunch that launched a million fan theories —thanks to a journal that implied Jackie had somehow seen films released long after the Yellowjackets’ plane crashed in the spring of 1996.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Can you reuse N95 and KN95 masks safely? Experts weigh in

  • The frequency, and how these masks end up being reused, often varies among experts."I don't think that the extended reuse of an N95 respirator is really a recommended practice by the CDC," says Kimiyoshi Kobayashi, M.D., chief quality officer at UMass Memorial Health, who explains that respirators were commonly sanitized by doctors using hydrogen peroxide gas and UV light in hospital settings.
  • Can you reuse an N95 face mask?Current CDC guidelines published online suggest that respirators including N95s and alternatives like KN95s shouldn't be worn more than five times.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Unsung heroes of COVID vaccination effort: Volunteers

By Dave Orrick
  • Medical Reserve Corp volunteer Patricia Seflow, a registered nurse from Minneapolis, hands a patient his COVID-19 vaccination card after administering the shot during a clinic at the Consulate of Mexico in St. Paul on Wednesday, Jan.12, 2022.
  • Brian Brown, left, Ramsey County's Medical Reserve Corp Coordinator and Carolina Ramirez, Emergency Preparedness Specialist, bring in supplies for a COVID-19 clinic at the Consulate of Mexico in St. Paul on Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2022.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Snow, ice blast through South with powerful winter storm

By PAMELA SAMPSON and KIM CHANDLER
  • Winter Storm Izzy dumped as much as 10 inches of snow in some areas of western North Carolina as the system moved across the southeastern U.S., said Brian Hurley, a meteorologist with the Weather Prediction Center in College Park, Maryland.
  • Kristen Baker Morrow's 6-year-old son made snow angels after their home in Crouse, North Carolina, got four inches of snow Sunday morning, but she said they couldn't stay outside long because of the uncomfortable wind chill.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

How the Tonga volcano has been felt around the world – video

A large underwater volcano in Tonga has sent huge swells around the world affecting countries bordering the Pacific Ocean. The tsunami waves caused damage to boats as far away as New Zealand and large swells were seen in California and Japan but did not appear to cause any widespread damage. Two people have drowned off a beach in northern Peru, local authorities say, after unusually high waves were recorded in several coastal areas

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Health officials say CCSD ‘pause’ will help district recover

By Julie Wootton-Greener
  • Clark County School District’s decision to cancel two days of classes — combined with a long holiday weekend — will help the district recover operationally after a surge in COVID-19 cases but it’s not clear how it may impact the community’s case rates, health officials say.
  • The school district, which has more than 300,000 students and 40,000 employees, announced last week that it’s canceling classes and activities for students under a “five-day pause” that began Friday because of “extreme staffing shortages.”
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Republicans didn’t bother to recruit a candidate to run against Sen. Tammy Duckworth

By Lynn Sweet
  • If Irvin wins the June 28 five-way primary — not a given, even if he gets billionaire Ken Griffin to throw in millions to boost his campaign — Irvin might be sharing the top of the ticket with a fringe Senate candidate peddling false election claims.
  • Meanwhile, Aurora Mayor Irvin is poised to launch his GOP governor bid on Monday, with his campaign lifted by the perception he will get the backing of billionaire Ken Griffin.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Electric utilities, MEMA on high alert as winter storm bears down on Maine

By Dennis Hoey
  • A winter storm that will bring heavy, wet snow, rain and powerful wind gusts to Maine on Monday has put the state’s two major utility companies and the state agency that monitors emergency preparedness on high alert.
  • Scattered power outages are likely because of two factors: heavy, wet snow over inland areas and wind gusts reaching up to 65 mph on the coast.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Boston clergy, activists invoke Martin Luther King Jr. Day to further ‘urgent’ push for voting rights reform

By Erin Tiernan
  • BOSTON MA January 16: Carol Marton of Boston holds a sign to pass the freedom to vote act during a program celebrating Dr. Martin Luther King's birthday, Sunday, January 16, 2021, in front of Faneuil Hall in Boston.
  • BOSTON MA January 16: Tanisha Sullivan President of the Boston branch of the NAACP, speaks about voting rights during a program celebrating Dr. Martin Luther King's birthday, Sunday, January 16, 2021, in front of Faneuil Hall in Boston.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

MLK Jr. will be honored in two separate ways  

  • For the second straight year, tributes throughout the Granite State today, honoring the greatest civil rights leader in American history, will be held virtually and not in person due to COVID-19.
  • And for the second straight year, leaders of the Martin Luther King Jr. Coalition-New Hampshire are simply rolling with the challenges, thankful that they at least have an alternative in place to reach out and talk about King.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Gov. Hogan Criticizes Federal Response To COVID-19 Surge In CBS Interview

  • Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan criticized the federal government’s response to a surge in COVID-19 cases that has strained the state’s hospitals during an interview on CBS News’ Face The Nation program Sunday morning.
  • “We did a lot of things to try to help increase the capacity of our hospital systems—sent in a thousand members of the National Guard,” Hogan told Face The Nation host Margaret Brennan.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

State Fair reports 2021 operating loss, raises admission rates for 2022

By Kristi Belcamino
Although Minnesotans had to go without their beloved State Fair in 2020, it returned despite numerous pandemic-related obstacles in 2021 to become one of the best-attended North American events of the year, according to Fair officials. In spite of the comeback, the Fair reported an operating loss of $1.3 million last year, general manager Jerry Hammer told the governing body of the Great Minnesota Get-Together on Sunday. When the Fair was canceled in 2020, the loss was $16.5 million, he said. The Minnesota State Agricultural Society, which oversees the state’s end-of-summer ritual, held its the 163rd annual meeting in Bloomington over the […]Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Dream on, white America …

By Barbara R. Arnwine and Daryl D. Jones
  • The disregard of the killers of the content of the character of Emmett Till is what drove King to wonder aloud about his children being judged not by the color of their skin but by the substance of the character of their person.
  • In evaluating the meaning of King's words regarding his four children being judged not by their skin color but by the content of their character, it is important to first understand that one needs to see beyond the race of the Emmett Tills of America, beyond the race of the Ahmaud Arberys of America, before judging them and their alleged acts.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Youngkin takes office with immediate focus on education, thrilling some and terrifying others

By Hannah Natanson
  • The mask order has left some educators and parents reeling, including the father of an immunocompromised second-grader with a brain tumor in Alexandria, who is uncertain whether he will continue to send his child to school, and an Arlington teacher, who is preparing to confront students who feel empowered to remove their masks.
  • Another order promises the investigation of Loudoun County Public Schools, a wealthy Northern Virginia district that has been embroiled in high-profile controversy for more than a year over allegations related to critical race theory and transgender rights, as well as administrators’ bungled handling of two sexual assaults.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

‘Grateful to be alive’: Rabbi expresses appreciation hours after rescue

By Boston Herald Wire Services
  • The rabbi held hostage for more than 11 hours inside his synagogue took to social media early Sunday — just hours after his rescue — to thank the community for its support and express gratefulness for the peaceful resolution.
  • “In the last hour of our hostage crisis, the gunman became increasingly belligerent and threatening,” Cytron-Walker said in a statement.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Twin Cities groups honor calls by Martin Luther King’s family to fight for voting rights

By Kim Hyatt, Katy Read
  • Newly elected Minneapolis Council Member Jason Chavez will speak at Powderhorn Park Monday morning in honor of MLK Jr., who he said "led the pathway for people like me to be elected on the City Council to now fight for human rights, housing justice and making sure everybody has a seat at the table."
  • Heeding the call of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s family, Twin Cities activists and organizations will honor his legacy by dedicating the 36th annual holiday to fighting for voting rights legislation.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Union moving all sites to distance learning Tuesday

  • With 145 teachers already slated to be absent Tuesday, officials with Union Public Schools announced Sunday evening that all campuses will be in distance learning Tuesday and Wednesday.
  • In the announcement, Union officials noted that as of Sunday, the district would have 98 uncovered classrooms Tuesday due to the high number of staff absences and limited substitute teacher availability.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Shakopee City Council, utility commission leave contentious past behind

By Erin Adler
  • "It was always this kind of back-and-forth relationship of who was managing who," said Kathi Mocol, president of the Shakopee Public Utilities Commission and a former City Council member.
  • That agreement, once a point of contention, is one of many indicators of an improved relationship between the Shakopee Public Utilities Commission (SPUC), an independent arm of the city, and the council.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Farewell to a teller of hard truths

By Bruce Peterson
  • But crucially, Wilson believed that if we could better understand our biological blueprint, we could create conditions that make people more likely to do the right thing on their own.
  • Wilson warned that since 99% of our evolutionary development took place in small groups on the African savanna, human nature was molded for intense contact with a few clansmen in a rich natural environment.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Former Brooklyn Center officer Kimberly Potter’s odds for successful appeal appear slim

By Chao Xiong, Rochelle Olson
  • Attorneys predicted that Potter's appeal would list a number of likely issues: the meaning of language in the manslaughter statutes and their application to Potter's actions, the instructions jurors received to guide their deliberations, and the judge's prohibition against defense attorneys presenting evidence on Wright's previous flight from police.
  • Hennepin County District Judge Regina Chu gave jurors instructions that said an element of first-degree manslaughter is the "reckless handling or use of a firearm" due to "a conscious or intentional act."
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

A needed push to protect state’s infants

By Editorial Board
  • State Health Commissioner Jan Malcolm should heed the recent guidance from a key advisory committee and add congenital cytomegalovirus to the list of disorders screened for in a spot of blood taken from newborns' heels.
  • Adding CMV to the newborn screening "blood spot" program — which includes more than 50 disorders — will help babies get a prompt diagnosis and treatment.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

COVID-19 patients show more signs of brain damage than people with Alzheimer’s disease

By Chris Melore
  • “Our findings suggest that patients hospitalized for COVID-19, and especially in those experiencing neurological symptoms during their acute infection, may have levels of brain injury markers that are as high as, or higher than, those seen in people who have Alzheimer’s disease,” says lead author Jennifer Frontera, MD, a professor in the Department of Neurology, in a university release .
  • Specifically, a team from NYU Grossman School of Medicine found significantly higher levels of certain blood proteins which typically arise when someone suffers neurological damage among COVID patients.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

China and Russia Have Found New Reasons to Team Up

By James G Stavridis
  • Putin wants to tightly bind the former Soviet republics of Central Asia to Russia, while China seeks to broaden economic and security relations with many of them.
  • These include the Collective Security Treaty Organization of six ex-Soviet states (under which the Kazakhstan intervention was carried out), the Shanghai Cooperative Organization (the largest nongovernmental group in the world based on population of member states), and the new Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership, an Asian free-trade group.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

India’s Inward Turn Could Stymie Its Rise

By Andy Mukherjee
  • Shortly before the 2014 election that made him prime minister, Narendra Modi came up with the idea that India’s young population, constitutional checks on arbitrary political power and large domestic market would bring prosperity over a decade.
  • Vietnam pegs half of the 120 tariff lines relevant to the mobile phone industry at zero; India imposes 15%-plus duties on a quarter of imported parts
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Home tests make counts less exact

  • So public health officials in New Hampshire and all other states estimate flu’s spread by taking reports on “influenza-like illness” and “acute respiratory syndrome” cases from hospitals or doctors offices and comparing them to past years, giving us a rough but useful picture.
  • That fluctuation is why this column has always used two-week running averages for deaths and new case counts.
Read more >Similar articles >

How Martin Luther King Day became a holiday and what these organizations are doing to celebrate

By Rett Nelson
  • It was August 28, 1963, a day that has become historic not just for being one of the largest gatherings for civil rights of its time, but also because of the words spoken by the man behind it all — Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • “Martin Luther King Day is a day of service and a time to reflect on the struggles others are facing,” Karen Vauk, President and CEO of The Idaho Foodbank, says in a news release.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

What vaccines mean to the people

By Letters to the Editor
  • Justice Sonia Sotomayor also missed the point when she erroneously cited numbers of children with the coronavirus when trying to support a vaccine mandate.
  • In reaction to these guidelines, public officials in various states have forbidden mask mandates while Congress rants about Occupational Safety and Health Administration requirements, which did give people a choice between vaccinations and tests.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Study: Some COVID-19 patients show more signs of brain damage than people with Alzheimer’s

By Chris Melore
  • “Our findings suggest that patients hospitalized for COVID-19, and especially in those experiencing neurological symptoms during their acute infection, may have levels of brain injury markers that are as high as, or higher than, those seen in people who have Alzheimer’s disease,” says lead author Jennifer Frontera, MD, a professor in the Department of Neurology, in a university release .
  • Researchers say, over the short-term course of their infections, seven markers of brain damage were noticeably higher among COVID patients than non-COVID patients with Alzheimer’s.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Gottlieb says Biden administration made mistake in federalizing vaccine mandates

By mschnell@thehill.com (Mychael Schnell)
  • Gottlieb on Sunday also said the administration made a mistake by blaming the Trump administration for problems involving the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other health agencies, noting that the entities “had deep flaws.”
  • Former Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb on Sunday said the Biden administration made a mistake by federalizing vaccine mandates “in ways that they didn’t have to.”
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Ukraine says Russia behind cyberattack in ‘hybrid war’ move

By Yuras Karmanau
  • The statement from the Ministry of Digital Development came a day after Microsoft said dozens of computer systems at an unspecified number of Ukrainian government agencies had been infected with destructive malware disguised as ransomware.
  • Ukraine said Sunday that Russia was behind a cyberattack that defaced its government websites and alleged that Russia is engaged in an increasing “hybrid war” against its neighbor.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Kansas City mayor: COVID-19 challenges include misinformation, political right

By mschnell@thehill.com (Mychael Schnell)
  • Kansas City, Missouri Mayor Quinton Lucas (D) on Sunday said he is facing two challenges as his municipality battles COVID-19: misinformation regarding vaccinations and opposition from the political right when it comes to mask mandates and other mitigation practices.
  • Lucas said the other challenge has has faced as mayor during the pandemic is battling misinformation, particularly when it comes to vaccines.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Carville advises Democrats to ‘quit being a whiny party’

By ooshin@thehill.com (Olafimihan Oshin)
  • Democratic strategist James Carville said on Sunday that Democrats should “quit being a whiny party” and instead focus on what accomplishments they've been able to achieve so far during the Biden presidency.
  • Carville responded that Democrats should tout their accomplishments, citing low child poverty rates and hourly wage workers getting a type of leverage and increases in pay not seen in decades.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

One bad week for President Joe Biden? Mitt Romney says it’s more like 52 bad weeks

By Dennis Romboy
  • While Romney said it’s important to reform the Electoral Count Act, federalizing state-run elections as he says Democrats are trying to do with voting rights bills isn’t something the founders envisioned.
  • Last week, Biden failed to align Senate Democrats behind an effort to get rid of the filibuster to pave the way for election reform and voting rights legislation.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Cool cars cruisin’ for a good cause

  • A rat with glowing red eyes shoots a shotgun out the back window of Mark Goodacre’s 1931 Chevy ratrod with an LS1 motor and Dodge Viper transmission as In-N-Out Burgers hosts the Cruisin’ 2 Freedom Car Show that is supporting the Slave 2 Nothing Foundation during Human Trafficking Awareness Month.
  • People admire Mark Goodacre’s 1931 Chevy ratrod with an LS1 motor and Dodge Viper transmission as In-N-Out Burgers hosts the Cruisin’ 2 Freedom Car Show that is supporting the Slave 2 Nothing Foundation during Human Trafficking Awareness Month.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Sullivan: ‘It’s too soon to tell’ if Texas synagogue hostage situation part of broader extremist threat

By mschnell@thehill.com (Mychael Schnell)
  • National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan Jake Sullivan Sunday shows preview: Democrats' struggle for voting rights bill comes to a head Canadian foreign minister to visit Kyiv next week to deter 'aggressive actions' by Russia US intelligence says Russia has prepared a false-flag operation to invade Ukraine MORE on Sunday said it is “too soon to tell” if the Texas synagogue hostage situation was part of a broader extremist threat.
  • President Biden Joe Biden Sunday shows preview: Democrats' struggle for voting rights bill comes to a head David Weil: Wrong man, wrong place, wrong time Biden's voting rights gamble prompts second-guessing MORE told reporters on Sunday that the hostage incident was an “act of terror," adding that local authorities and the FBI "did one hell of a job" in responding to the situation.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

2 people hospitalized in 2-vehicle rollover on I-35 Sunday

By Kelsey Thompson
AUSTIN (KXAN) — Four people were involved in a crash on northbound Interstate 35 that led to a two-vehicle rollover. Austin-Travis County EMS crews responded to a two-vehicle collision in the 1600 block of northbound I-35 just before 2 p.m. Sunday. Crews helped extricate four patients after both vehicles rolled over. Two patients have been transported to Dell Seton Medical Center with "potentially serious" injuries; however, officials said those aren’t expected to be life-threatening. The other two patients involved refused medical transport. Heavy traffic delays are expected on both northbound and southbound I-35 following […]Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Bruins place Karson Kuhlman on waivers

By Steve Conroy
The Bruins placed reserve right wing Karson Kuhlman on waivers on Sunday, according to Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman. The 26-year-old Kuhlman, who signed with the B’s as a free agent out of Minnesota-Duluth in 2018, has a goal and an assist in 19 games this year. He’s got 7-8-15 totals in 75 career NHL games. The move suggests that Trent Frederic and/or Nick Foligno are close to being activated off injured reserve. Foligno appeared to have dodged a serious injury after getting tangled up with an opponent and awkwardly falling on a net-front play in the B’s victory in Tampa on January 8. He resumed skating last Friday. Frederic suffered an […]Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Newsom budget: The good, the bad and the ugly

By Jon Coupal
  • The governor’s budget puts more money into the reserve accounts, accelerates the paydown of state retirement liabilities, eliminates some budgetary debt, and allocates 86 percent of the discretionary surplus to one-time spending rather than ongoing liabilities that has so often happened in past years.
  • Under the governor’s budget, schools would see more than $20,000 per student, putting California in the top five of states in education spending – with little to show for it.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Much of upstate New York under winter storm warning

By Michelle Del Rey, Lauren Stanforth
  • The immediate Capital Region, however, is missing the worst of the storm, as a swath along the Hudson River is predicted to see between two to four inches of snow, with additional sleet and freezing rain possible as temperatures warm Monday, according to the National Weather Service.
  • Many New York residents will wake up to snow and ice Monday, as the state is in the path of a major storm that is impacting the East Coast from Alabama to Maine.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

FDA: Medtronic slow to update, recall defective insulin pumps for diabetes patients

By Burl Gilyard
  • Medtech giant Medtronic took more than three years to replace and start recalling insulin pumps with defective retainer rings after first becoming aware of the problem, according to an FDA warning letter sent to the company in December and recently made public.
  • The FDA letter detailed that Medtronic started an internal investigation in June 2016 as it was receiving more complaints about clear retainer rings breaking in its MiniMed 600 series insulin pumps.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Snow, ice blasts through South with powerful winter storm

By PAMELA SAMPSON and KIM CHANDLER
  • Kristen Baker Morrow's 6-year-old son made snow angels after their home in Crouse, North Carolina, got four inches of snow Sunday morning, but she said they couldn't stay outside long because of the uncomfortable wind chill.
  • By noon Sunday, between 8 and 12 inches (20 and 30 centimeters) of snow had fallen in some counties of North Carolina, while significant icing was causing problems in the central part of the state.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

​​Democrats make voting rights push ahead of Senate consideration

By mschnell@thehill.com (Mychael Schnell)
  • Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer Chuck Schumer Kyrsten Sinema's courage, Washington hypocrisy, and the politics of rage Joe Biden's disastrous 48 hours Biden's desperate pitch to keep minority voters MORE (D-N.Y.) has vowed to hold a vote on changing the rules to the 60-vote legislative filibuster if Republicans again oppose voting rights reform, but that threat was muddied last week after Sens.
  • Sen. Mitt Romney Willard (Mitt) Mitt Romney Sunday shows preview: Democrats' struggle for voting rights bill comes to a head Kyrsten Sinema's courage, Washington hypocrisy, and the politics of rage Romney says it 'would be nuts' for the RNC to block candidates from commission debates MORE (R-Utah) also knocked the administration on Sunday, telling NBC’s “Meet the Press” that the White House never reached out to him regarding voting rights negotiations.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Despite pandemic, investments in Minnesota startups top $1B again in 2021

By Nick Williams
  • In 2021, venture capital-backed Minnesota companies raised $1.34 billion, down slightly from 2020's $1.54 billion, but above 2019's $1.2 billion, according to a recent report from Seattle-based investment data firm PitchBook and the National Venture Capital Association.
  • For the third consecutive year, investors committed more than $1 billion to rising and privately owned Minnesota startups, a sign the state's entrepreneurs are still able to garner dollars from wealthy institutions and individuals amid an ongoing pandemic.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

‘An act of terror’: Biden condemns Texas synagogue siege while FBI names Briton as hostage-taker

By Oliver Laughland, Josh Halliday and Dan Sabbagh
  • US president Joe Biden has condemned a tense 11-hour hostage standoff at a synagogue in Texas on Saturday as “an act of terror”, as the FBI named the armed assailant as Malik Faisal Akram, a 44-year-old British national.
  • The president said he had contacted the synagogue’s rabbi, Charlie Cytron-Walker, who posted an account of the incident to Facebook on Sunday .
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Here’s a listing of MLK Day events for the Twin Cities

  • At 4 p.m., the University of Minnesota is hosting its 41th annual concert honoring Martin Luther King Jr. The special virtual tribute will be live-streamed from the Ted Mann Concert Hall, intermixing the words of King with musical performances from students and the greater Twin Cities community.
  • This year’s annual UNCF MLK Breakfast will take place virtually from 8:45 to 10:30 a.m., with the keynote speaker Laura Coates, CNN host and senior legal analyst.
Read more >Similar articles >

Ticket buyers complain about Sundance Film Festival’s no-refunds policy

By The Salt Lake Tribune
People who bought tickets to in-person events at the 2022 Sundance Film Festival are finding they won’t be refunded now that the festival has been moved online, FOX 13 reports.For the second year in a row, the Sundance Film Festival won’t be screening films in Utah because of the COVID-19 pandemic, organizers announced Jan. 5.Multiple people who spent hundreds of dollars on ticket packages with in-person benefits told FOX 13 that they feel disappointed and cheated by the festival’s refund policies.One man, Scott Hossner, bought a $750 ticket package, which included 10 tickets — sold individually at $20 each — plus in-person perks that, […]Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

British man identified as hostage-taker at Texas synagogue

By JAKE BLEIBERG and ERIC TUCKER
  • Authorities on Sunday identified a 44-year-old British national as the man who took four people hostage at a Texas synagogue for 10 hours before an FBI SWAT team stormed the building, ending a tense standoff that President Joe Biden called "an act of terror."
  • Law enforcement officials who were not authorized to discuss the ongoing investigation and who spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity earlier said the hostage-taker demanded the release of Aafia Siddiqui, a Pakistani neuroscientist suspected of having ties to al-Qaida who is in a federal prison in Texas.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Cash buys, private flights, changing rules: How Idaho hides from execution oversight

  • Court proceedings and documents judges ordered released in a public records lawsuit show that in Idaho’s last two executions — Paul Rhoades in 2011 and Richard Leavitt in 2012 — IDOC paid more than $20,000 in cash to acquire the drugs from out-of-state pharmacies in the days leading up to scheduled lethal injections.
  • The Union Avenue Compounding Pharmacy in Tacoma, Washington, was linked by the release of public records under court order to the May 2012 sale of lethal injection drugs to the Idaho Department of Correction.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

For Oath Keepers and founder, Jan. 6 was weeks in the making

By COLLEEN LONG
  • The indictment last week of Rhodes, the leader of the Oath Keepers, and 10 other members or associates was stunning in part because federal prosecutors, after a year of investigating the insurrection of Jan. 6, 2021, charged them with seditious conspiracy, a rarely-used Civil War-era statute reserved for only the most serious of political criminals.
  • Two days after the presidential election on Nov. 2, 2020, the Oath Keepers were already convinced that victory had been stolen from President Donald Trump and members of the far-right militia group were making plans to march on the U.S. Capitol.
Read more >Similar articles >

Walmart Filings Reveal Plans to Create Cryptocurrency and NFTs

By Brendan Case and Susan Decker / Bloomberg
  • The applications were among a flurry the company filed on Dec. 30, including three under “Walmart Connect” — the name of the company’s existing digital advertising venture — for a financial exchange for virtual currency and advertising.
  • The retailer sought several new trademarks in December that show it intends to make and sell virtual goods such as electronics, decor, toys, sporting goods and personal-care products.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Glenn Youngkin bans critical race theory on day one as Virginia governor

By Oliver Laughland
  • Virginia’s newly elected Republican governor has immediately passed a swath of conservative orders – ranging from attempts to alter local school curriculums to loosening public health mandates during the pandemic – after being sworn into office on Saturday.
  • On Saturday, after taking the oath of office, Youngkin unveiled a list of nine executive orders and two executive directives, with the first on the list described as a directive to “restore excellence in education by ending the use of divisive concepts, including Critical Race Theory, in public education”.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Kacey Musgraves is happy to take her sad divorce record on the road, starting in St. Paul

By Chris Riemenschneider
  • On top of all the renewed worry about COVID, Kacey Musgraves faces what seems like another daunting hurdle heading into her tour this week: singing the ultra-personal, heartbreak-filled songs off her latest album night after night.
  • Like a Texan caught in a squall, though, the Grammy-winning country-turned-pop singer is shrugging off the latter concern — and a lot of other headline-making news related to her 2021 record "Star-Crossed."
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

How Balvina’s Mexican Kitchen keeps delicious traditions alive

By Anne Valdespino
  • Balvina’s Mexican Kitchen in Laguna Hills serves traditional Mexican and American favorites including fajitas, mole, steak, chilaquiles, huevos rancheros, buttermilk pancakes and French toast.
  • Balvina’s Mexican Kitchen in Laguna Hills serves traditional Mexican and American favorites including fajitas, mole, steak, chilaquiles, huevos rancheros, buttermilk pancakes and French toast.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Marana Unified School district holding job fair

  • The Unidas Teen Philanthropy Program has opened its enrollment period for high school students in Pima County to participate during the spring semester.
  • Unidas, an after-school program that teaches teens about philanthropy, offers students a community in which like-minded peers can engage in guided discussions on topics such as leadership, gender equity, social justice and more.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Public health expert: Biden administration needs to have agencies on the ‘same page’ about COVID

By jchoi@thehill.com (Joseph Choi)
  • Ashish Jha, the dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, on Sunday advised the Biden administration to get its agencies on the "same page" when it came to COVID-19 messaging, saying a consistent message would be "enormously helpful."
  • "I think the White House needs to get its messaging discipline together, needs to make sure that people are speaking from the same page," said Jha.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Tucson to lean on voters, uncertain federal grants in new roadwork funding plan

  • The city council also pulled $14 million from Tucson's general fund to put towards road repair recently, something that hasn’t been done historically because money for road work has come mainly through sales tax revenue or grant funds.
  • The two new funding sources will only create a combined $19 million in extra funds each year – just a drop, however, in the $128 million bucket that needs to be filled if the city hopes to reach its Move Tucson goal.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

At many churches, pandemic hits collection plates, budgets

The coronavirus hit at a time when already fewer Americans were going to worship services — with at least half of the nearly 15,300 congregations surveyed in a 2020 report by Faith Communities Today reporting weekly attendance of 65 or less — and exacerbated the problems at smaller churches where increasingly lean budgets often hindered them from things like hiring full-time clergy. […]Read more >Similar articles >