Jan 16, 2022

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Chefs’ isolation in kitchens can trigger violence and abuse, study finds

By Robert Booth Social affairs correspondent
  • Working long hours away from the bill-paying public in often windowless and cramped kitchens creates a parallel moral universe in which abuse and violence is the norm, the study of 47 chefs at restaurants in Europe, Asia, Australia and north America by academics at Cardiff University found.
  • The physical isolation of chefs working in Michelin-starred kitchens can lead to violent misbehaviour and a feeling that “the rules don’t apply”, a study based on interviews with dozens of top chefs has found.
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Empathy and decreasing medical liability [PODCAST]

By The Podcast by KevinMD
  • “Through empathy-based training, physicians and other health care providers learn the skills to have honest informed consent discussions without causing undo fear, while also preparing patients for all possible outcomes.
  • She shares her story and discusses her KevinMD article, “ The role of empathy in improving patient care and decreasing medical liability .”
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‘He said, I’m in Canada’: the doctor will see you now – but not from Australia

By Lauren Marer

Australian-trained doctors living overseas are treating patients in rural and regional New South Wales, to curb the bush doctor shortage


Bet Matthews set off on a trip of salvation from Queensland to Victoria last year, to visit her sister and ex-husband who had both been diagnosed with cancer. She was there to assist with whatever they needed, but in the end it was she who needed the help.

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Hydroxychloroquine Delays Disability for Least Treatable Form of Multiple Sclerosis

By Neuroscience News
  • A University of Calgary study has found promising results for the generic drug hydroxychloroquine when used to treat the evolution of disability of primary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), the least treatable form of the autoimmune disease.
  • Cumming School of Medicine research teams led by Dr. Marcus Koch, MD, Ph.D., and Dr. Wee Yong, Ph.D., found hydroxychloroquine helped to slow the worsening of disability during the 18-month study involving participants at the MS clinic in Calgary.
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French parliament approves vaccine pass law to tackle Covid

By Reuters in Paris

Law will require people to have a certificate to enter public places such as restaurants and cinemas

France’s parliament has given final approval to the government’s latest measures to tackle Covid-19, including a vaccine pass contested by anti-vaccine protesters.

Lawmakers in the lower house of parliament voted 215 in favour to 58 against on Sunday, paving the way for the law to enter force in the coming days.

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Symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder can predict complicated grief reactions among terrorism survivors

By Eric W. Dolan
  • However, while most people experience that their bereavement-related distress diminishes over time, traumatic loss (e.g., death by a terrorist attack) can lead to severe, intense and persistent psychological reactions, such as symptoms of PTSD and complicated grief,” Glad explained.
  • As such, I was interested in exploring the longitudinal association between symptoms of complicated grief and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among the survivors from the Utøya Island massacre,” said study author Kristin Alve Glad, clinical psychologist and researcher at the Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies .
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How to move: with migraines

By Manuela Callari

Migraines can be debilitating, but exercise may help limit their frequency and intensity. Here are some points to consider

  • In the How to move series, experts offer advice on exercising without exacerbating pain and fatigue

Migraines are the most common form of headache that can cause severe throbbing pain – usually on one side of the head – and severely affect quality of life. A migraine attack can last hours or days and often comes with nausea, vomiting and extreme sensitivity to light and sound.

According to a 2018 Deloitte Access Economics Report, almost 5 million people in Australia live with migraine, with 7.6% of them – around 400,000 people – experiencing chronic migraine, which means more than 15 migraine days per month.

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Don’t demonise those who refuse the Covid vaccine | Letters

By Letters

One reader’s experience of the effects on family members of the conspiracy theories surrounding vaccinations

I read David Green’s letter on anti-vaxxers (12 January) and empathised with the letter written in response (13 January). The week before Christmas my dad died of Covid. The intensive care consultant couldn’t have been clearer that, in her opinion, if he had been vaccinated he would not have developed Covid pneumonia to the severity that he did.

He died very frightened and asking his family to come and be with him, and we couldn’t. The experience traumatised my sister so badly that she was hospitalised with psychosis three days after his passing. The reason he wasn’t vaccinated is because his mind was poisoned with conspiracy theories and misinformation exacerbated by two years of lockdown and reduced social contact. While I am angry that he would not get vaccinated, I don’t think any good would ever come from criminalising his choice.

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >
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What do we know about the 175,000 people who died of Covid in the UK?

By Niamh McIntyre, Tobi Thomas, Pamela Duncan and Glenn Swann
  • ONS analysis covering the first 10 months of 2021 shows risk of death involving Covid-19 to be 28 times higher among unvaccinated people than among the vaccinated population.
  • The ONS last published data on this topic in early 2021, analysing close to 8,000 deaths involving coronavirus within the working age population across England and Wales to the end of 2020, showing that those working in close proximity to others had higher death rates.
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Legal challenge from Disability Rights Texas may have repercussions in schools across the country

By Eva Kittay, PhD
  • This was immediately seen as a win for disabled students in Texas, who, like their cohorts elsewhere, have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19, the ensuing school closures, and breakdowns in the provision of needed services.
  • It is also a win for parents of disabled children in other states across the nation who would have a playbook to follow to help protect the rights of their children to safely attend school.
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Stephanie Van, M.D. | Physiatrist

By Johns Hopkins Medicine
Stephanie Van, M.D., is a physiatrist specializing in interventional pain management and musculoskeletal medicine, with clinic locations in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. Her expertise includes evaluating and treating people with back pain and other ligament, joint and muscle conditions, as well as complex chronic pain due to neurological disorders like stroke, brain and spinal cord injuries, and complex regional pain syndrome. Dr. Van is experienced in outpatient procedures such as trigger point injections, joint injections and spinal injections for arthritis and nerve pain. #PainManagement #JohnsHopkinsDr. Van is an assistant […]Read more >Similar articles >
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‘Encouraging signs’ plan B Covid measures may soon be lifted in England

By Andrew Gregory Health editor
  • In the clearest hint yet that some or all of the measures will be removed on that date, Dowden, who also serves as minister without portfolio, said that while the government would review further data this week before making a decision, the “signs are encouraging”.
  • Ministers are seeing “encouraging” signs that plan B coronavirus restrictions in England could be lifted in 10 days’ time, the chair of the Conservative party, Oliver Dowden, has said.
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Italian nurse accused of giving fake Covid jabs to anti-vaxxers arrested

By Lorenzo Tondo in Palermo
  • Italian police have arrested a nurse in Palermo for allegedly pretending to give Covid vaccines to anti-vaxxer activists so they could benefit from official health certificates to travel and access bars, restaurants and public transport in the country.
  • Dozens of health workers, including at least three doctors, have been charged or investigated on suspicion of administering fake jabs to people in recent months, with some paying up to €400 (£330) each for the service.
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Boris Johnson will address No 10 ‘party culture’, says Tory chief

By Andrew Sparrow Political correspondent
  • In his interview, Dowden said that when Johnson responds to the findings of the report in a statement in the Commons, he will “make sure that we address the kind of culture that has allowed [the partying] to happen in the first place”.
  • Boris Johnson is committed to changing the culture at Downing Street that led to staff partying and drinking while the country was in lockdown, the Conservative chair, Oliver Dowden, has said.
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Life after lockdown: how do we best recover from the pandemic?

By Rebecca Seal
  • I wouldn’t be surprised if that turned out to be the result of the pandemic, too,” says Ashley Nemiro, senior adviser for the global Mental Health and Psychosocial Support Network, which helps people working in crises.
  • Prior to Covid, Ripley studied people who survived tornadoes and terror attacks, emergencies for which the mental health consequences are much better understood than the long, slow-burn, seemingly endless one we find ourselves living through.
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Sharing Mayo Clinic: A glimmer of hope

By Joel Streed
  • Identifying the KLHL11 biomarker using advanced testing from Mayo Clinic Laboratories (Test ID: K11CC or K11CS ) allowed Gregor’s medical team to confirm a diagnosis of testicular cancer-associated paraneoplastic encephalitis .
  • While Gregor Heinrich never could have imagined that testicular cancer was related to his problems with vision and gait, learning he was positive for KLHL11 protein biomarkers meant he could receive treatment for both the cancer and the illness behind it.
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Noises off: the battle to save our quiet places

By Alex Moshakis
  • “To not be able to experience nature without human noise,” he said, “to me that feels like a real loss.”
  • (The rustling of leaves shouldn’t be considered a disturbance, Allan thinks, even if it exceeds decibel limits.) Sometimes during a recording a dog would bark, or an aeroplane would fly low overhead, or parakeets would squawk from trees, sending decibel levels soaring.
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Call to stop jailing pregnant women in England after baby dies in prison toilet

By Hannah Summers
  • Academics who examined the experiences of 22 women who were pregnant while serving time in English prisons have called for alternatives to custodial sentences to avoid putting expectant mothers and unborn babies at risk.
  • Naomi Delap, director of the charity Birth Companions, said: “This vital research shows, despite repeated assurances, prison should only be used as a last resort, pregnant women are being incarcerated for non-violent offences, sometimes very close to their babies’ due dates.
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Toxic reaction: how to clear dangerous pollutants out of your home

By Anna Turns
  • But many toxic chemicals released from products in our home accumulate in dust, from fragrances to PFASs, so it’s important to wipe it away regularly with a damp cloth – no polish required.
  • Six months ago, I had my blood tested for 100 different persistent organic pollutants or POPs – chemicals such as pesticides and flame retardants that accumulate inside us and stick around for longer than we’d like.
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Better sick pay, testing and ventilation: Labour’s Covid plan to keep UK open

By Toby Helm Political editor & James Tapper
  • With the government preparing to ease many Covid restrictions when plan B measures are reviewed on 26 January, Labour is determined to remind people of the Tories’ “chaotic” performance over PPE, testing and other Covid issues, while positioning itself as ready to keep life as normal as possible in the event of future surges.
  • Shadow health secretary Wes Streeting’s 10-point plan includes measures to raise sick pay, improve testing, share vaccines worldwide and transform social care.
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Superheroes can have disabilities, too [PODCAST]

By The Podcast by KevinMD
  • While aging clinicians may have had to live in the shadows with their disabilities, we have a new generation of aspiring clinicians who want to be “out” with their disability and share their experiences to bring more representation to their respective fields.
  • She shares her story and discusses her KevinMD article, “ Superheroes can have disabilities, too .”
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Finding Creativity Through Movement

By Neuroscience News
  • “Our research shows that it is not movement per se that helps us to think more flexibly,” says neuroscientist Dr. Barbara Händel from Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg (JMU) in Bavaria, Germany.
  • Summary: Researchers say the freedom to make self-determined movements may be key to flexible thinking and creativity.
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Mayo Clinic’s statement on the Declaration of Local Emergency requiring masking in indoor spaces in Rochester

By Ron Petrovich
  • Mayo Clinic appreciates the Declaration of Local Emergency requiring masking in indoor spaces in Rochester to help reduce the spread of COVID-19 during this surge.
  • The post Mayo Clinic’s statement on the Declaration of Local Emergency requiring masking in indoor spaces in Rochester appeared first on Mayo Clinic News Network .
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Impaired glucose tolerance is a risk factor for cognitive decline, study finds

By Eric W. Dolan
  • Impaired glucose tolerance at midlife predicts worse performance in a test measuring episodic memory after ten years, according to new research published in the journal Diabetes Care .
  • “Our study found that higher post-load blood glucose level (glucose measured following glucose drink) in a glucose tolerance test at midlife is associated with weaker performance in a memory test ten years later,” Toppala told PsyPost.
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‘Steering is going to be a challenge’: a beginner’s guide to river tubing

By Stephanie Convery

Paddle in hand, Stephanie Convery rolls on an unexpected branch of the Yarra River

For most Australians, mention of the Yarra River likely brings to mind the opaque sludge that wends its way through Melbourne’s central business district. But the river didn’t always look like that, and if you follow it upstream towards its source in the Dandenong Ranges, the vista is one of verdant bush, clean air and bubbling cold rapids.

This is the part of the Yarra on which we are going tubing – that is, rolling down the river on little more than a tyre tube.

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When retirement is code for “You’re fired!”

By Arthur Lazarus, MD, MBA
  • Unknown at the time is the fact that there were a series of fires and suicides committed by patients at the psychiatric facility where he was chief medical officer during the year prior to his departure.
  • When confronted with a forced job severance, the first question to ask is this: Do you want to take this opportunity to retire, or do you prefer to continue working (elsewhere, of course)?
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Hindu gods, Aztec rites, Blondie hits … why the heart is our eternal symbol

By Louisa Young
  • In an Egyptian poem, at least 3,000 years old, a woman says: “My heart flutters hastily when I think of my love for you; it lets me not act sensibly, it leaps from its place.”
  • Over millennia and across the world, the heart has also been a house, a book, a rose, a pine cone, a pomegranate, a bunch of grapes, a pincushion, a wheel, a fountain, a picnic spot, a cup, a harp, a map.
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Vulnerable adults left without care in England as staff crisis worsens

By Chaminda Jayanetti
  • This inevitably means that growing numbers of older and disabled people are going without the care and support they need, and that where unpaid carers are helping their loved ones, they are being forced to do more for longer, unaided and with no chance of a break.
  • Caroline Abrahams, Age UK’s charity director, said: “It comes to something when so many paid-for hours of care are not being used, all because there aren’t enough staff to put them into effect.
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Reconceptualizing stress as a coping tool improves students’ performance on upcoming math exam

By Beth Ellwood
  • Compared to the placebo group, students in the reappraisal condition reported more coping resources and less math evaluation anxiety from the first to the second exam.
  • Before they began the second exam, the students either read a scientific article detailing the adaptive benefits of stress during testing situations (reappraisal condition) or read an article instructing that the best way to improve performance before a test is to ignore feelings of stress (placebo condition).
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How weekly bike rides with a group of supportive women showed me a route to joy

By Tanya Frank
  • So, I was surprised when the Waltham Forest newsletter reported a different kind of joyriding: a cycling group that is free, for women, and that loans bikes to the members who need them.
  • It has grown since its inception, but JoyRiders started right here in my borough where we have an infrastructure of 27km of cycle paths, known as Mini Holland.
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Are we oversimplifying Alzheimer’s disease?

By Peter Attia
  • The researchers analyzed a large collection of data (thousands of brain scans) to propose that the varied AD presentations can be organized into 4 distinct subtypes based on a protein called tau.
  • Four distinct subtypes of Alzheimer’s Disease based on tau protein aggregate location (grey regions) and progression: (a) Limbic; (b) Posterior; (c) Medial-temporal lobe sparing (MTL-sparing); (d) Left-temporal (L temporal).
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Covid cases have hit plateau in parts of UK, says top medical adviser

By Clea Skopeliti
  • The number of Covid infections appears to have reached a plateau in parts of the UK, a senior government health adviser has said, with experts expressing optimism about the latest data.
  • Infections are flattening in London, the south-east and the east of England, while the rise is slowing in the north of England, said Dr Susan Hopkins, the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) chief medical adviser.
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The NHS isn’t ‘coping’ with Omicron – just ask doctors and patients | Rachel Clarke

By Rachel Clarke
  • Another 335 deaths within 28 days of a diagnosis of Covid were recorded on Thursday, even as the pandemic is being dismissed as essentially over by many in the government and media.
  • Although hospitals were “sending out signals saying that they are feeling the pressure hugely”, he claimed, we could nevertheless “ ride out ” the Omicron wave with nothing more than “a difficult period for our wonderful NHS for the next few weeks”.
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‘He’s got to go’: Keir Starmer says Boris Johnson is unfit as leader – video

Keir Starmer has ramped up the pressure onBoris Johnsonas the prime minister fights to save his job, arguing that the stream of explosive allegations of Downing Street parties has left him 'unable to lead'.

In a speech to the Fabian Society conference, the Labour leader accused theConservativesof running the NHS into the ground

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Psychiatrists warn of police and crime bill’s impact on young people

By Damien Gayle
  • “One result of this legislation, if passed, will be that young people face a choice between being intimidated into inaction and isolation, or possibly criminalised if they choose to act,” the letter says.
  • Hundreds of clinical psychiatrists and psychologists have warned that the police and crime bill currently reaching its final stages in parliament “will have a profound negative impact on young people’s mental health”.
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Global heating linked to early birth and damage to babies’ health, scientists find

By Damian Carrington Environment editor

Exclusive: Studies show high temperatures and air pollution during pregnancy can cause lifelong health effects

The climate crisis is damaging the health of foetuses, babies and infants across the world, six new studies have found.

Scientists discovered increased heat was linked to fast weight gain in babies, which increases the risk of obesity in later life. Higher temperatures were also linked to premature birth, which can have lifelong health effects, and to increased hospital admissions of young children.

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >

I left my husband on good terms but now I feel out of control | Ask Annalisa Barbieri

By Annalisa Barbieri

You say he wants to move back in – but try to discuss with him what a marriage really is, and trust yourself with your needs and those of your children

I left my husband last summer. We have three young children who live with me, but see their dad regularly. Things are cordial and he is financially supporting us. However, the separation has highlighted the distance there’s always been between us in our decade-long relationship.

My husband is a hard worker but emotionally distant and can be blind to my needs and those of the children. We’d been living abroad, very rurally, for nine years, doing up a house – and I home-educated the children. I have become increasingly depressed since the separation and am kicking myself for decisions I’ve made and gone along with.

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Covid live news: pressure grows on Boris Johnson over lockdown parties; Djokovic to spend night in detention

By Lucy Campbell
  • Tennis star Novak Djokovic will spend Saturday night in immigration detention before seeking a court ruling to stop his deportation and keep alive his bid for a record 21st major title at the Australian Open, Reuters reports.
  • A court order on Friday night had required the 34-year-old to surrender to immigration officials for an interview on Saturday morning, before he would be taken to his lawyers’ officers for the preliminary hearing.
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Panting, moaning and ‘pussy-gazing’: the couple who podcast their ‘elevated sex’ sessions

By Coco Khan

Lacey Haynes and Flynn Talbot want to improve the world’s love life – starting by doing it live on air in every episode

Lacey Haynes is a women’s “intuitive healer”, and guides couples in yoga-informed “elevated sex”. When she opens her front door, the first thing I notice about the Canadian podcaster is her fashionable faux fur slippers and chic blunt fringe. Where is the western wellness guru uniform of linen tunic, elephant-print trousers and culturally inappropriate head jewellery, I wonder?

Inside the living room, I spot the hot-pink sofa that Haynes’ Australian husband, Flynn Talbot, a men’s life coach and fellow elevated sex practitioner, calls “love island”. Fans of their podcast – Lacey and Flynn Have Sex – will know it as one of many locations around their house where they take the title literally, recording themselves having sex in the bedroom, on the kitchen barstool, and beyond.

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >
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New Screening Tool Developed to Automatically Identify Older Appearing Brains Typical of Dementia

By Neuroscience News
  • Using a deep learning based neuroradiology report classifier, the researchers generated a dataset of 23, 302 ‘radiologically normal for age’ head MRI examinations from two large UK hospitals, namely, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust and King’s College Hospital using the pre-existing neuroradiology reports.
  • First author Dr David Wood, researcher at the School of Biomedical Engineering and Imaging Sciences, said a key aspect of this study was the use of a large, clinically-representative dataset for model training.
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Symptoms and Traits of Borderline Personality Disorder May Run In Families

By Neuroscience News
  • Family members of those with borderline personality disorder (BPD) show similarities in their brains and personalities—and even interpret some facial expressions similarly, according to a series of studies by researchers at the University of Toronto.
  • For example, relatives show the same bias toward sad facial expressions, a pattern of weakness and strength in self-regulatory skills and distinct brain activation patterns during impulse control.
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The Free-Energy Principle Explains the Brain

By Neuroscience News
  • As with the simple cost/benefit calculation that can predict the speed that a cat will begin to gallop, researchers at RIKEN CBS are trying to discover the basic mathematical principles that underly how neural networks self-optimize.
  • The RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) in Japan, along with colleagues, has shown that the free-energy principle can explain how neural networks are optimized for efficiency.
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Boston schools face staff shortages amid sky-high COVID cases

By Stephanie Sy
Most of the nation's nearly 100,000 public schools are open. But as the omicron surge continues, some districts are struggling to keep in-person learning going. Boston Public Schools have been operating in person since last spring, though a high number of cases are raising concerns about whether there will be enough teachers and staff. Stephanie Sy reports on how the district is faring. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Link Between Brain Cell Development and Risk of Schizophrenia Discovered

By Neuroscience News
  • Summary: The genetic disruption of specific cell processes crucial to brain development was linked to disease risk in a wide range of mental health disorders including schizophrenia.
  • This research is the first time that genetic disruption of specific cell processes crucial to brain development has been linked to disease risk in a wide range of psychiatric disorders.
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Ozone Exposure Linked to Cognitive Decline in Older Adults

By Neuroscience News
  • A new, large-scale study led by scientists at the Yale School of Public Health has established a robust link between long-term ozone exposure and an increased risk of cognitive impairment in older adults.
  • “Our findings suggest potential benefits in delaying the progression of cognitive decline among older adults if ozone levels are reduced below the new WHO Global Air Quality Guideline for ozone pollution,” said Kai Chen, Ph.D., assistant professor at the Yale School of Public Health and the study’s lead author.
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U.S. hospitals buckle under latest surge of COVID hospitalizations

By William Brangham
President Biden on Friday announced free tests to help combat the rapidly spreading omicron variant. But the surge is battering hospitals and stretching some to capacity, with COVID hospitalizations jumping 179 percent in the past two weeks. William Brangham reports, and speaks with Dr. Rajan Garg, ICU medical director at Methodist Hospital of Southern California, to learn more. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Penis-centric views of masculinity are linked to prejudiced attitudes toward women, according to a new study

By Eric W. Dolan
  • This has implications for education and intervention — disabusing young men of the notion that masculinity is tied to physical attributes (like their penis) may help to allay men’s concerns about sexual inadequacy, and mitigate the development of compensatory (chronically prejudiced) ideologies against women.
  • “We noted from personal experience, social media, and anecdote that the penis is often conflated with masculinity — it appears commonly accepted that part of being a ‘real man’ involves physical attributes of size, strength, and above all, a large penis,” said study author Cory L.
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New Theory Proposes Forgetting Is Actually a Form of Learning

By Neuroscience News
  • The scientists behind the new theory – outlined today in leading international journal Nature Reviews Neuroscience – suggest that changes in our ability to access specific memories are based on environmental feedback and predictability.
  • “Importantly, we believe that this ‘natural forgetting’ is reversible in certain circumstances, and that in disease states – such as in people living with Alzheimer’s disease for example – these natural forgetting mechanisms are hijacked, which results in greatly reduced engram cell accessibility and pathological memory loss.”
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Cáncer de pulmón: no solamente es por fumar

By Sharon Theimer
El Día Mundial contra el Cáncer es el 4 de febrero ROCHESTER, Minnesota: El Día Mundial contra el Cáncer se celebra el 4 de febrero y, por lo tanto, ahora es el momento ideal para hablar sobre el cáncer de pulmón y el hábito de fumar. A nivel internacional, el cáncer de pulmón es la causa más frecuente de muerte por cáncer y la Organización Mundial de la Salud calcula que el 90 por ciento de los casos pueden prevenirse si se elimina el consumo de tabaco. Aunque la gente que fuma es la que más riesgo corre, el consumo de tabaco sin humo también se relaciona con cáncer de pulmón y esta enfermedad asimismo se presenta en personas que no […]Read more >Similar articles >

Federal Testing Website Will Launch Next Week and Offer 4 Tests Per Home

By Zeke Miller / AP
  • The federal website where Americans can request free COVID-19 tests will begin accepting orders on Wednesday as the White House looks to address nationwide shortages, but supplies will be limited to just four free tests per home.
  • The White House said the four-test limit on website orders will be applied to each residential address and will apply to the first tranche of 500 million tests.
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COVID ebbs in some East Coast hot spots, rises elsewhere

By Jim Wappes
  • Cases are declining in a few big cities in the eastern United States that felt the earliest impact from the Omicron (B.1.1.529) variant, but surges are still building in other regions of the country, pushing some hospitals and workplaces to the brink.
  • Meanwhile in Europe, the pace of COVID-19 activity is still picking up in several countries, with the United Kingdom today describing a clearer picture of hospitalizations in young kids.
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Family of Cornwall girl, 6, misled over cause of death, coroner finds

By Steven Morris
  • A six-year-old girl thought to have died from sepsis was in fact suffering from a blood condition triggered by E coli infection, an inquest has found.
  • After the hearing Coco’s family said: “Four and a half years after Coco died, three years after the trust fully accepted a series of failings in their care, we heard for the first time in court the suggestion that Coco did not have sepsis.”
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COVID-19 worsens maternal, fetal outcomes, studies find

By Jim Wappes
  • In the first study, University of Edinburgh and Public Health Scotland researchers analyzed national, population-level data on COVID-19 vaccine uptake and SARS-CoV-2 infections in pregnant women.
  • A study led by Institute for Systems Biology researchers in Seattle showed that pregnant women infected with SARS-CoV-2 have higher odds of adverse birth outcomes, including preterm birth, small size for gestational age, low birth weight, and stillbirth.
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Keir Starmer vows ‘great renewal’ of NHS in bid to make Labour a vote winner

By Heather Stewart Jessica ElgotPeter Walker
  • With Labour drawing ahead in the polls, party strategists are keen to point to what a Starmer government would aim to deliver were he to win the next general election.
  • Elections analyst Robert Hayward said that while the recent change in polling numbers made the May elections more challenging for Johnson, the likely focus on results in London, a Labour stronghold, posed issues for Starmer as well.
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BOUNDARIES AND AUTONOMY: Navigating life with emotion and finding maturity

By Marc Paquette
A strong indicator of emotional maturity, for me, is the ability to have difficult conversations. Having a conversation that you do not want to have, while accompanied by an all-you-can-eat buffet of emotional resistance, demonstrates a healthy balance between self-awareness, empathy, vulnerability and trust. Or, at the very least, we hope to have that balance going into it. And we hope that the same virtues are exercised by our interlocutor. But we don’t always show up the way we want

Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
[…]Read more >Similar articles >
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Firm tackles US drug shortages during COVID with Wisconsin plant

By Jim Wappes
  • Schondelmeyer, PharmD, PhD, RDSP co-principal investigator, said, "The Nexus Pharmaceuticals facility helps strengthen the US drug supply chain by providing assured quality for drug products made here in the United States instead of somewhere else in the world."
  • After witnessing generic drug quality issues during visits to Asian manufacturing facilities and wrestling with dwindling domestic production capacity and foreign pricing fluctuations, family-run Nexus Pharmaceuticals found a solution a half hour north of its Lincolnshire, Illinois, headquarters.
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Why Your COVID Test Results Take That Long

  • The many steps along the way, as well as staffing and other issues, including outbreaks of COVID-19 among lab staff, can delay the turnaround time for results.
  • The journey of the nasal swab -- from the collection point to the test results arriving by text or email -- is more involved and complicated than most people realize, Milner and other experts say.
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Covid booster jabs in England to be thrown away as demand falls

By Denis Campbell and Nicola Davis
  • Booster jabs distributed in England for the pre-Christmas vaccination push are to be thrown away because of a lack of demand, a leaked NHS memo reveals.
  • The memo, sent on Thursday from NHS England’s vaccination team to officials managing the 3,000 vaccination sites around the country, said that some stocks would reach their expiry date without being used.
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Get familiar with the 2021/2022 coding changes

By James Maskell
  • The most important changes in 2021 for RPM billing include an expansion of CPT codes for greater billing potential, what defines remote patient monitoring, and the types of health care professionals who can provide these services.
  • In my previous article, we covered 5 proven ways to use 2021/2022 CPT coding changes to leverage your time, team, and outsourcing capabilities to grow your practice and improve patient outcomes.
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Tell motorists to help tackle London’s toxic air peaks, authorities urged

By Matthew Taylor
  • Campaigners have called on the government to urge people not to drive or light wood-burning stoves during toxic air peaks rather than telling the vulnerable not to exercise or go outside.
  • Greenpeace UK’s chief scientist, Doug Parr, said: “Resorting to telling people not to exercise during a spike in air pollution levels is like asking victims of burglary not to get robbed.
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Understanding Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) Webinar – Part 2

By Johns Hopkins Medicine
  • Learn from Johns Hopkins heart specialists for a two-hour virtual seminar during which they provide information about hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), including an overview of abnormal heart rhythms, special circumstances, research, and future therapies in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
  • Introduction: Jose Madrazo, M.D., Director of the Johns Hopkins Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Center & Charles Lowenstein, M.D, Director of Johns Hopkins Division of Cardiology and Co-Director of the Johns Hopkins Heart and Vascular Institute
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Labour peer’s AI healthcare firm Sensyne warns cash is running out

By Julia Kollewe
  • “Whilst the board believes the financing will proceed to completion in the near term, without it the company is unlikely to be able to continue to trade beyond early February 2022 by which time the formal sale process will not have concluded,” Sensyne said.
  • Shares in Sensyne Health plummeted after the healthcare technology company run by Lord Drayson, the former UK science and defence minister, warned it could run out of money within weeks if it is unable to secure emergency financing.
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Omicron Is Making America’s Bad Jobs Even Worse

By Amanda Mull
  • Now the Omicron surge is laying bare how few protections workers have retained from the scant services given to them earlier in the pandemic, and just how little safety and stability this kind of work provides to the people who do it.
  • That effort clearly has contributed to the tipping-point dynamic: Cases have surged at the exact same time that many protections for workers, including the FFCRA, have expired, and the relatively small number of employers who voluntarily granted extra sick leave and other benefits have largely rolled back those programs.
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Labour peer’s AI healthcare firm Sensyne says cash is running out

By Julia Kollewe
  • “Whilst the board believes the financing will proceed to completion in the near term, without it the company is unlikely to be able to continue to trade beyond early February 2022 by which time the formal sale process will not have concluded,” Sensyne said.
  • Shares in Sensyne Health plummeted after the healthcare technology company run by Lord Drayson, the former UK science and defence minister, warned it could run out of money within weeks if it is unable to secure emergency financing.
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News Scan for Jan 14, 2022

By Jim Wappes
  • A phase 3 clinical trial today in JAMA finds that only 29.0% of 314 asymptomatic COVID-19–infected people living with an infected household member developed symptomatic illness after receiving the monoclonal antibodies casirivimab and imdevimab, compared with 42.3% given a placebo.
  • Needless insurer spending on ivermectin prescriptions for COVID-19, estimated at $2.5 million in the United States for the week of Aug 13, 2021—the most recent week analyzed—would extrapolate to $130 million annually, US researchers reported yesterday in JAMA .
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What’s Past Omicron’s Peak?

By Katherine J. Wu
  • On its record-shattering sprint upward, Omicron had certain advantages : The virus seems to thrive in the upper airway and become contagious fast ; it’s ace at dodging a lot of the antibodies in vaccinated and previously infected people, giving it a larger pool of hosts to work with than Delta.
  • Even if the United States’ curve turns out to be symmetrical, half of this wave’s infections, and more than half of its hospitalizations and deaths, are still ahead, past the peak of cases.
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Masks Cut Distance Coronavirus Travels in Half

  • FRIDAY, Jan. 14, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Face masks are touted as a key tool in preventing the spread of COVID-19, and a new study offers more proof that they work.
  • "The research provides clear evidence and guidelines that three feet of distancing with face coverings is better than six feet of distancing without face coverings," said study co-author Kareem Ahmed.
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Investigating lack of aging services in rural Colorado

By Shannon Najmabadi
  • When one of my colleagues saw a press release that suggested a 1,870 square mile rural county had been without a home health or hospice provider for the better part of a year, we thought it would be a good opportunity to write about the availability of these services in the state’s rural areas as baby boomers age.
  • Given Colorado’s aging population, the decision to seek hospice or home health care are choices that most people will eventually face, as is the possibility that the services may not be available in their home county.
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Children more willing to share with White than Black peers, and this may be driven by racial stereotypes about wealth

By Beth Ellwood
  • A study published in the Journal of Experimental Child Psychology found that children were more likely to share their resources with White children than Black children.
  • For example, children as young as three years old show racially-biased giving behavior, choosing to allocate more resources to White children compared to Black children.
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Government in dispute with ‘VIP lane’ firm referred by Tory peer

By David Conn
  • Asked by Rayner to clarify how this was deemed to be the case, the minister provided his answer on 11 January, saying: “The information is considered commercially sensitive as the department is currently engaged in a mediation process with PPE Medpro concerning their products, which involves confidentiality undertakings.”
  • The government is in dispute over millions of surgical gowns supplied by the PPE business awarded £203m contracts via the fast-track “VIP lane” following a referral by the Conservative peer Michelle Mone, it has emerged.
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Weekend reading: Agroecology, Regenerative Ag, Indigenous Foodways

By Marion
Check out this new report from the Global Alliance for the Future of Food, an alliance of foundations devoted to using “our resources and networks to get sustainable food systems on the poltical, economic, and social agenda.” The Politics of Knowledge: Understanding the Evidence for Agroecology, Regenerative Approaches, and Indigenous Foodways Working with 17 contributing teams representing geographic, institutional, sectoral, gender, and racial diversity, the compendium is anchored in debunking the most common narratives about the future of food, addressing questions about yield, scaling potential, and economic viability.For an overview […]Read more >Similar articles >

An Anti-overdose Drug Is Getting Stronger. Maybe That’s a Bad Thing?

By Abdullah Shihipar
  • Meanwhile, David Belian, a spokesperson for Hikma Pharmaceuticals, the company behind Kloxxado, said in an email that “the FDA, American Medical Association and CDC have cited the need for higher doses of naloxone to reverse the deadly effects of opioid overdoses, and we are providing another important treatment option.”
  • In recent months, the pharmaceutical industry has pushed to make sure that naloxone can keep up with fentanyl, engaging in an “opioid-antagonist arms race” to bring stronger forms of naloxone to market, says Lucas Hill, a pharmacy professor at the University of Texas at Austin who studies opioids.
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Wales to reopen nightclubs and allow large crowds at outdoor events

By Steven Morris
  • Large crowds are being allowed to return to outdoor events in Wales and nightclubs are to reopen as the government in Cardiff says the Omicron “storm” has been weathered.
  • The Welsh first minister, Mark Drakeford, also said it would no longer be a legal requirement for people to work from home, though it would still be important for them to do so if possible.
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Antibodies aren’t the whole story

By Umair Irfan
  • When the human body is infected by the virus or encounters a fragment of the pathogen in a vaccine, our immune systems change in subtle but important ways.
  • They form many kinds of white blood cells that jump into action right away when they encounter a virus for the first time, and that essentially take notes to start planning for the next infection.
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Scottish Tories set to deliver snub to Johnson by not inviting him to spring conference – as it happened

By Andrew Sparrow
  • After many months of rolling stories of breaches of Covid rules if not laws by the national Conservative party I can no longer remain a member of this embarrassment show.
  • The civil war between the Scottish Tories and Downing Street has deepened after it emerged that Boris Johnson will not be invited to address this spring’s Scottish Conservative conference – an unprecedented snub for a UK leader of the party.
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With No End in Sight to Pandemic Life, Parents Find Disruption Is the New Normal

By Katharine Gammon
  • Some 65,000 kids tested positive before school reopened; another 85,000 or so were also absent the first day, partly, perhaps, because of parental fear of the virus.
  • This is parenting in Southern California in the days of omicron, swimming in an ocean of angst, with currents constantly shifting direction, an awkward soup of fear, determination and gratitude for those doing the hard work of keeping schools working.
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How often can you safely reuse your KN95 or N95 mask?

By Paulina Firozi
  • Surging coronavirus cases in the United States, driven by the highly contagious omicron variant, have prompted renewed recommendations from health experts that the public should consider wearing more protective face coverings, such as N95 or KN95 masks.
  • “Next week, we’ll announce how we are making high-quality masks available to the American people for free,” Biden said Thursday.
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As Omicron Surges, Effort to Vaccinate Young Children Stalls

By Rachana Pradhan and Hannah Recht
  • Two months after Pfizer’s covid vaccine was authorized for children ages 5 to 11, just 27% have received at least one shot, according to Jan. 12 data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention .
  • The huge variations in where children are getting vaccinated reflect what has occurred with other age groups: Children have been much less likely to get shots in the Deep South, where hesitancy, political views and misinformation have blunted adult vaccination rates as well.
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Expert Alert: Mayo Clinic Healthcare pulmonologist offers tips to manage asthma

LONDON — Asthma is a condition where airways narrow and swell, possibly producing extra mucus and other symptoms. While asthma affect adults, it's the most common long-term disease in children. More than 262 million people globally are affected by asthma and more than 461,000 have died from it, according to the World Health Organization. There's no cure for asthma, and for some people, asthma is a minor nuisance. For others, it can interfere with daily […]Read more >Similar articles >

What is ‘flurona’ and why a Mayo Clinic expert says flu cases are rising

Flu cases are starting to rise across parts of the U.S. And that's concerning because fewer people are vaccinated for flu, compared to last year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). With the COVID-19 omicron variant also spreading, Dr. Stephen McMullan, a Mayo Clinic family medicine physician, explains what a coinfection of the flu and COVID-19 dubbed "flurona" means. Watch: Dr. Stephen McMullan explains what a flu-COVID-19 coinfection is and why […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Using only 100 atoms, electric fields can be detected and changed

By USC News
  • The Armani Lab was responsible for creating the new organic molecule, while the Kapadia Lab played a key role in testing how efficiently the "modifier" was generating electricity when activated by light.
  • "This multi-functional imaging agent is already compatible with existing microscopes," said Armani, the Ray Irani Chair in Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, "so it will enable a wide range of researchers -- from biology to neuroscience to physiology -- to ask new types of questions about biological systems and their response to different stimuli: drugs and environmental factors.
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Unlocking adults’ implicit statistical learning by cognitive depletion

By mdbownds@wisc.edu (Deric Bownds)
  • make the fascinating observation that inhibition of our adult cognitive control system by non-invasive brain stimulation can unleash some of our infant implicit statistical learning abilities - the learning of novel words embedded in a string of spoken syllables.
  • Specifically, we tested the prediction that depleting cognitive control mechanisms in adults enhances their implicit, auditory word-segmentation abilities.
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Neurofeedback might have clinical potential for patients with non-anxious major depressive disorder

By Eric W. Dolan
  • “We previously used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to show that whilst thinking about self-blame-evoking statements, the communication between two brain regions — the subgenual part of the frontal region and a section of the anterior temporal lobe just beneath our right temple — predicted risk of recurrent depression,” Zahn explained.
  • “Together with my colleague Jorge Moll from the D’Or Institute for Research and Education in Rio de Janeiro, my research group has started to identify the brain circuits that are important for overgeneralized self-blame in depression (e.g.
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What a Supreme Court decision on vaccine mandates means for workers

By John Yang
The conservative majority of justices on the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday blocked President Biden's COVID vaccination policy, stating that the administration had overstepped its authority with the rule, which would've applied to more than 80 million workers. Marcia Coyle, of The National Law Journal, and Labor Secretary Marty Walsh, join John Yang to discuss. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Heart Disease Causes Early Brain Dysfunction and Can Treble Key Alzheimer’s Protein

By Neuroscience News
  • The new research, published in eLife, has found that heart disease causes a breakdown of a key brain function which links brain activity and blood flow, meaning the brain gets less blood for the same amount of activity.
  • “ Assessment of neurovascular coupling and cortical spreading depression in mixed mouse models of atherosclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease ” by Osman Shabir et al.
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Next-Generation Tissue Expansion Method Improves Neural Imaging

By Neuroscience News
  • The upgrade is implemented in “eMAP,” a new and improved version of the “magnified analysis of proteome,” or MAP, technology introduced in 2016 by the lab of Associate Professor Kwanghun Chung.
  • In a recent paper in Science Advances, Chung and co-authors show that with eMAP, many proteins at neural connections, or “synapses,” can now be imaged when they could not before.
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USC launches its third satellite into space

By USC News
  • Partner Lockheed Martin supported USC students (graduate and undergraduate) and faculty to take an internally built Cubesat (measuring 30 cms by 10 by 10, called Dodona) the size of bread box and test Lockheed Martin's newest payload technologies in orbit, including new software that allows for rapid mission changes while in orbit.
  • Said Tom Smith, vice president for Lockheed Martin's Centers of Excellence that include Optical Payloads: "The La Jument integrated payload was designed by Lockheed Martin and then integrated and tested with Dodona by USC students at the Space Engineering Research Center (SERC).
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Dried Goji Berries May Provide Protection Against Age-Related Vision Loss

By Neuroscience News
  • Regularly eating a small serving of dried goji berries may help prevent or delay the development of age-related macular degeneration, or AMD, in healthy middle-aged people, according to a small, randomized trial conducted at the University of California, Davis.
  • The researchers found that 13 healthy participants aged 45 to 65 who consumed 28 grams (about one ounce, or a handful) of goji berries five times a week for 90 days increased the density of protective pigments in their eyes.
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Epstein-Barr Virus May Be Leading Cause of Multiple Sclerosis

By Neuroscience News
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS), a progressive disease that affects 2.8 million people worldwide and for which there is no definitive cure, is likely caused by infection with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), according to a study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health researchers.
  • “The hypothesis that EBV causes MS has been investigated by our group and others for several years, but this is the first study providing compelling evidence of causality,” said Alberto Ascherio, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard Chan School and senior author of the study.
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Why We Feel Confident About Decisions We Make

By Neuroscience News
  • “Using our model, we’ve successfully shown that decisions are most likely to feel right if we have invested significant attentional effort in weighing up the different options and, what’s more, are conscious of having done so,” says Polanía, who heads up the Decision Neuroscience Lab at ETH Zurich.
  • Summary: A new computational model found decisions people are most likely to feel right about are a result of the attentional effort to consciously weigh up different options.
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Research sheds light on COVID-19 vaccine inequities in California

By USC News
  • Published in the Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, the study confirms that vaccination velocity - the rate of change in COVID-19 vaccination coverage - was lower in high vulnerability California counties compared to moderate and low vulnerability ones, as measured by the Social Vulnerability Index (SVI).
  • The research also points to improved vaccine access and targeted community outreach as potential gamechangers in reducing health inequities in vulnerable communities.
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India’s COVID-19 cases surge as parts of Europe eye easing restrictions

By Jim Wappes
  • India's daily COVID-19 cases jumped well past 200,000 today, reaching the highest levels since last spring, as some countries in Europe that were affected early by the Omicron (B.1.1.529) variant considered easing some restrictions.
  • Though much of Europe is in the midst of intense COVID-19 surges, with activity moving from west to east, some earlier affected countries are considering easing some restrictions.
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Supreme Court blocks COVID vaccine mandate for large employers

By Jim Wappes
  • "The Supreme Court's decision on the OSHA mandate is a major setback to President Biden's COVID strategy and will prolong the pandemic in the United States," said Lawrence Gostin, JD, the faculty director of the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law and Georgetown University Law Center, in a press statement .
  • Today the US Supreme Court blocked a COVID-19 vaccine mandate that would have affected one in three American workers while leaving in place a requirement for healthcare workers.
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Justices Block Broad Worker Vaccine Requirement, Allow Health Worker Mandate to Proceed

By Julie Rovner, Kaiser Health News
  • At the same time, however, the justices said that a separate rule requiring covid vaccines for an estimated 10 million health workers at facilities that receive funding from Medicare and Medicaid could go forward.
  • In emergency oral arguments held Jan. 7, a majority of the justices seemed dubious that the federal government, through the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, had broad enough authority to require vaccines or tests for the bulk of the nation’s private workforce, particularly for a threat that is not job-specific.
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Study shows how Delta variant endangers pregnancy

  • Earlier in the pandemic, before Delta became the dominant strain in the U.S., Andrea Edlow, a maternal-fetal medicine specialist at MGH, and several colleagues had studied 64 pregnant women with COVID-19 and found that none had detectable levels of SARS-CoV-2 in their blood or placentas.
  • A growing body of evidence has linked the Delta variant of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, with an increased risk for pregnancy complications, including stillbirths.
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Studies: COVID vaccines effective, with limited waning

By Jim Wappes
  • Of the current study, the authors said, "In this real-world evaluation of the effectiveness of the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine in adolescents between 12 and 18 years of age in the United States, when the delta variant was predominant, we found that the vaccine was highly effective against Covid-19 hospitalization and critical illness, including among patients with underlying risk factors for severe illness.
  • A study led by United Kingdom Health Security Agency researchers assessed the effectiveness of the Pfizer and AstraZeneca vaccines among COVID-19 patients in England from Dec 8, 2020, to Oct 1, 2021, a period marked by the emergence of Delta.
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More Folks Drive High When Pot Made Legal

  • THURSDAY, Jan. 13, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Here's more evidence that marijuana may make driving more dangerous: As pot has been legalized in more countries and states, a greater number of people are driving intoxicated by the drug and crashing, researchers report.
  • "However, acute cannabis use causes cognitive deficits and psychomotor impairment, and there is evidence that drivers with THC levels of 5 ng/mL or more are at higher risk of crashing," he said.
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Overdose deaths hit a historic high in 2020. Frustrated experts say these strategies could save lives

By Laura Santhanam
  • While the Biden administration has said it will broaden access to harm reduction and treatment, experts say the money that has been set aside isn’t doing enough to slow the rising pace of overdose deaths in this country.
  • In the 2020 calendar year, nearly 92,000 people died, and the rate of fatal drug overdoses accelerated by 31 percent compared to the previous year, according to recent data from the National Center for Health Statistics within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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Why we should celebrate the Great Resignation

By Wendy Schofer, MD
  • It’s very easy to focus on reasons why physicians left their jobs over the past two years: COVID demands, childcare challenges, ongoing burnout, and administrative burdens, the unforgiving culture of medicine, and the American workaholic mentality have collectively come to a big, juicy head and it’s about to burst.
  • But “I quit” is not a response that comes easily to mid-career physicians.
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Javid tells NHS England to give private hospitals up to £270m in case of Omicron surge

By Denis Campbell and Julia Kollewe
  • The health secretary ignored strongly worded warnings from Amanda Pritchard and instructed her to hand private hospitals £75m to £90m a month from NHS England funds for the next three months, in case they are needed to help manage a new Omicron-driven surge in Covid cases.
  • Sajid Javid has ordered the boss of the health service to give private hospitals up to £270m, even though they may not treat any NHS patients in return, despite her deep misgivings about the deal.
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KHN’s ‘What the Health?’: Dealing With Drug Prices

  • This week’s panelists are Julie Rovner of KHN, Joanne Kenen of Politico and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Sarah Karlin-Smith of the Pink Sheet and Rachel Cohrs of Stat.
  • Medicare’s announcement this week proposing to restrict coverage of Aduhelm, the controversial new drug to treat Alzheimer’s disease, suggests officials overseeing the health care program were not in sync with the FDA, which gave the drug limited approval late last year.
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The U.S. Is Facing Shortages in COVID-19 Drugs as Omicron Rages

By MATTHEW PERRONE/AP
  • White House COVID-19 coordinator Jeff Zients said this week that the government collaborated with Pfizer to help speed up development of the pill by several months, and that officials continue to work with the company to look for ways to boost production.
  • While the supply is expected to improve dramatically in the coming months, doctors are clamoring for the pills now, not just because Omicron is causing an explosion of cases but because two antibody drugs that were once the go-to treatments don’t work as well against the variant.
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Epstein-Barr virus may be leading cause of multiple sclerosis

  • Multiple sclerosis, a progressive disease that affects 2.8 million people worldwide and for which there is no definitive cure, is likely caused by infection with the Epstein-Barr virus, according to a study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health researchers.
  • “The hypothesis that EBV causes MS has been investigated by our group and others for several years, but this is the first study providing compelling evidence of causality,” said Alberto Ascherio, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard Chan School and senior author of the study.
Read more >Similar articles >
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COVID-19 Scan for Jan 13, 2022

By Jim Wappes
  • A pair of case reports published today in The Journal of Infectious Diseases detail fetal deaths and fetal distress in mothers who were unvaccinated and had mild COVID-19 infections involving the Delta (B1617.2) variant.
  • Austrian scientists writing in a letter in the New England Journal of Medicine yesterday demonstrate poor neutralization of the Omicron variant when using serum from vaccinated or recovered COVID-19 patients, potentially signaling a need for variant-specific vaccines.
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