Mar 02, 2021

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Dolly Parton gets first vaccine dose, calls anti-vaxxers ‘cowards’

By Hannah Frishberg
  • “I’ve been waiting a while, I’m old enough to get it, and I’m smart enough to get it,” she told her fans, specifying that she received the Moderna COVID-19 shot, which she helped fund with a $1 million donation last November.
  • “Dolly gets a dose of her own medicine,” Dolly Parton, 75, tweeted on Tuesday, alongside a photo of her at her appointment, sporting a sparkly-blue long-sleeve shirt with upper arm cutouts in just the right place for the coronavirus vaccine injection.
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Kentucky residents waiting on backlogged unemployment benefits filled with anxiety, anger

  • But a WLWT investigation found that portal almost always has a message that reads, "No Availability - Please check back daily for new appointments.""It's almost like a slap in the face," Spector said.Making matters worse for both Spector and Siebe are automated calls they receive from the state each night, letting them know their case files exist, somewhere."My husband recognizes the phone number, my daughter recognizes the phone number," Siebe said.
  • "We're just going to use this system just to let you know we haven’t forgot about you.' when, in fact, I think I've been lost somewhere in the system."Dykes traveled to Louisville Friday to speak to Beshear face-to-face and ask him when victims of Kentucky's currently broken unemployment system will get their money."I wish I could tell them that, that they won't have to wait any longer," Beshear said.
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Channing D. Phillips tapped for third tour as acting U.S. attorney for D.C.

By Spencer Hsu, Keith L. Alexander, Meagan Flynn
  • Phillips will return to a third tour as acting U.S. attorney for Washington, D.C., on Wednesday and serve until confirmation of a permanent top federal prosecutor for the District, the Justice Department announced.
  • Phillips will take office Wednesday on an interim basis until a new U.S. attorney for the District is confirmed, the spokesman said.
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School choice, charter school bills advance in Iowa House

By Katie Akin
  • Iowa House panels considered two parts of the governor’s education proposal Tuesday: a plan to establish a new charter school program and a student scholarship fund to allow some public school students to transfer to a private school.
  • Melissa Peterson, lobbyist for the Iowa State Education Association, said she did not know of any cases where a charter school application was rejected under the current state law.
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LGBTQ Supporters Protest Against Bills Involving Transgender Youth

By Kay McCabe
On Tuesday, LGBTQ Alabamians and supporters gathered outside the Alabama State House to protest the House Bill 1, Senate Bill 10, and House Bill 319, pertaining to transgender children and student athletes. “Our hope is to come out here, be in their faces while they’re pulling into the parking lot,” said one protester, “so they know that we don’t want what they’re trying to do.” The fight to have their voices heard was greater than just passing bills, some say it’s their lives on the line. “These bills will increase suicide among the transgender communities,” said Travis Jackson, “and increase hate crimes towards the trans gender […]Read more >Similar articles >

Keep wearing your mask, health officials say after Gov. Greg Abbott lifts mask mandate

By Karen Brooks Harper
  • Keep wearing your mask and taking COVID-19 safety precautions, local health experts said Tuesday, after Gov. Greg Abbott announced he was lifting the statewide mask mandate and restrictions on businesses.
  • Expressing concerns about highly contagious variants of the virus and the need for local health officials to maintain some authority over their local situations — which vary widely from county to county — doctors and health officials cautioned that Texans should not take Abbott’s announcement as a signal to relax the behavior that has lead to a recent decrease in coronavirus case rates and hospitalizations.
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Jonathan Tucker says new sci-fi show ‘Debris’ explores ‘meaningful’ issues

By Lauren Sarner
  • “One of the things that’s fun for the audience of this show and fun for me and my co-star Riann is we’re responding to things that are totally fantastic and otherworldly — but in a very grounded experience here on Earth,” said Tucker.
  • Just like “The X-Files,” the agents in “Debris” are an odd-couple pair with different sensibilities: there’s M16’s Finola Jones (Riann Steele), an idealist who thinks the debris’ otherworldly qualities might be able to help humanity, and CIA agent Bryan Beneventi (Tucker), an ex-Marine vet who fears what the alien tech could do in the wrong hands.
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Elections Commission to more frequently contact voters who may have moved

  • The commission, which consists of three Democrats and three Republicans, likely won't send a new mailing to voters believed to have moved until the state Supreme Court rules on the issue.
  • The new approach comes as the bipartisan commission awaits a decision from the state Supreme Court that will determine whether it must quickly take voters off the rolls when it suspects them of having moved.
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Expected shipment of Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine will help Wisconsin vaccinate teachers more quickly, officials say

  • On Monday teachers and child care workers became eligible for the vaccine in Wisconsin, and it appears the expected boost in supply from Johnson & Johnson's first shipment has allowed local vaccine providers to schedule appointments for many districts.
  • The roughly 47,000 doses of the newly approved Johnson & Johnson vaccine set to arrive in Wisconsin next week will play a key role in quickly vaccinating teachers, state health officials said Tuesday.
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Bill to remove Iowa’s gun permit requirements advances quickly in House, Senate

By Katie Akin
  • Under the new bill, known as Senate Study Bill 1232 and House Study Bill 254, Iowans could purchase and carry a firearm without applying for permits through the sheriff’s office.
  • But opponents to the bill, including Democratic lawmakers, argued the repeal of the permit requirements would make it legal for individuals with no background check to purchase a gun from an unlicensed dealer and to carry that weapon in public.
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Greg Abbott is endangering the health of Texas and beyond

By Editorial Board
  • He announced plans on Tuesday to completely open establishments next week and lift a face mask mandate for public areas, retreating from the vital measures needed to fight the coronavirus pandemic.
  • If there was any lesson from the disastrous push by then-President Donald Trump last year to open up — which triggered a massive Sun Belt surge of infection in Texas, Florida and Arizona — it is not to lift restrictions too soon.
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Leak of Bombshell CBS Investigation Led to Multimillion-Dollar Settlement

By William D. Cohan, Joe Pompeo
  • In December 2018, a 59-page draft of the report written by the legal teams at Debevoise and Covington was leaked to The New York Times.
  • In the summer of 2018, CBS hired two prominent law firms, Debevoise & Plimpton and Covington & Burling, to conduct an investigation into the sexual-misconduct allegations swirling around Les Moonves —CEO of CBS Corporation at the time—and the CBS News unit.
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Why the vaccine rollout in Austin is taking longer than some would like

  • "The problems have been largely in part the result of the distribution of enough supply," said Don Kettl, the Sid Richardson Professor at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin .
  • "And as we get more of the vaccine produced and more of it distributed, some of that problem is going to be going away," he said, saying the second problem is a signup process that is too complicated.
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Hillicon Valley: Senate confirms Biden Commerce secretary pick Gina Raimondo | Wray hints at federal response to SolarWinds hack | Virginia governor signs comprehensive data privacy law

By rklar@thehill.com (Rebecca Klar,Maggie Miller and Chris Mills Rodrigo)
Welcome to Hillicon Valley, The Hill's newsletter detailing all you need to know about the tech and cyber news from Capitol Hill to Silicon Valley. If you don’t already, be sure to sign up for our newsletter by clicking HERE.Welcome! Follow […]Read more >Similar articles >

Two Year Anniversary Memorials For the Lee County Tornado

By Ja Nai Wright
Two years ago on March 3rd 2019 at 2:03 pm, tragedy came down on lee county in the form of a 170 mile per hour tornado. When the storm was over, the tornado left nothing but destruction and loss in its wake. Now just two years after, Lee county is once again taking the time to remember that day and all that was lost, from personal belongings to homes, and worst of all family. This year the community will have multiple memorial type services throughout the day starting at 10 am with a home dedication to the Dean family, a Reflections and Remembrance ceremony outside of the courthouse square in Opelika Co, a moment of silence at 2:03pm at the […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Wisconsin teachers to be prioritized for Johnson & Johnson vaccine next week

By Scott Bauer
  • — Teachers will be prioritized to receive the first shipment of about 48,000 doses of the one-shot Johnson & Johnson coronavirus vaccine coming to Wisconsin next week, a bolster in supply that won’t be matched again for several weeks, the state’s deputy health secretary said Tuesday.
  • About 30% of Wisconsin public school districts — 131 out of 421 — will be done vaccinating teachers by March 15, said Julie Willems Van Dijk, deputy secretary of the Wisconsin Department of Health Services.
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Operation Warp Speed’s Triumph

  • President Biden announced Tuesday that the U.S. should have enough vaccine supply for every American adult by the end of May. Last week the Food and Drug Administration finally approved Johnson & Johnson ’s vaccine, and this week J&J struck a deal with Merck to manufacture the single-shot J&J vaccine as well.
  • Critics scoffed when President Trump set a target of having a vaccine approved by the end of 2020, and Kamala Harris suggested she might not take a shot recommended by the Trump Administration.
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Poll: Vaccine hesitancy may be more political than racial

  • A poll by Civiqs found 56% of white Republican voters said they would not accept a vaccine or weren’t sure, compared to only 31% of Black Americans who answered no.
  • Birckhead said a new effort to use text messaging to communicate with Prince George's residents is achieving good results, with 50% of the people contacted responding and securing appointments for slots now reserved for county residents.
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Hundreds in Central Texas still without water 2 weeks after winter storm

By Kaitlyn Karmout
  • Peays a local Texan and once the non-profit learned of the tremendous need in Texas, Water Mission team members along with "Plumbers without Borders" and the Austin Disaster Relief Network put out a call to the community.
  • Austin Disaster Relief Network (ADRN) will operate an Intake Center later this week to assist residents impacted by Winter Storm by providing food, gas, housing, and repairing damage to their homes.
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Prince William County teacher on administrative leave amid alleged comments about Capitol riot has resigned

  • — Prince William County teacher that was on leave amid an investigation into his comments to students about the Capitol riot has resigned from his job, according to the school district he worked for.
  • Lynn Middle School history teacher Benjamin Plummer on administrative leave in early January due to an investigation it opened because of comments he allegedly made to students about the Capitol riot, according to the district.
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Metrorail control center continues to ignore safety guidelines, board says

By Justin George
  • Managers within Metro’s rail operations control center, or ROCC, instructed controllers to deviate from procedures “dozens of times or more” during the last two months, Samarasinghe said during the safety commission’s monthly meeting.
  • Metrorail managers continue to ignore safety guidelines and put workers at risk despite Metro’s pledge to change a stubborn culture within its main control center, according to a commission that monitors safety at the transit agency.
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Counterpoint: Aid in dying is not the help ill Minnesotans need

By Steve Bergeson
  • The newest legislative proposal for doctor-assisted suicide would degrade the trusting relationship patients have with their providers and would harm vulnerable people ("Minnesotans need end-of-life aid," Feb. 24 ).
  • If the assisted suicide bill becomes law, it would require that providers who deal with terminal illnesses advise patients about the "treatment option" of ending their lives.
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Big Oil ‘Friends’ the Carbon Tax

  • That said, a timely new model from José Luis Cruz Álvarez and Esteban Rossi-Hansberg of Princeton allows that human behavior, including reproductive behavior, will adapt to future climate changes as indeed it has since early man sought out cave openings that pointed away from the prevailing winds.
  • Even with this glitch, they see trade and migration doing much to alleviate the pains of a changing climate.
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Six Dr. Seuss books will no longer be published because of racist images

By Marie Szaniszlo
  • On Tuesday, the business that preserves the author’s legacy announced that six of his books — including “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street” and “If I Ran the Zoo” — will no longer be published because of racist and insensitive imagery.
  • “These books portray people in ways that are hurtful and wrong,” Dr. Seuss Enterprises said in a statement that coincided with the late author and illustrator’s birthday.
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Celtics Notebook: Marcus Smart return ‘getting a lot closer’

By Mark Murphy
  • “And I think that there comes a time where you have to just realize like, if you’re fouling too much, it’s hard to play because you’re either putting the team into the bonus early or you’re giving them free throws once they’re there,” he said.
  • And I think that sometimes that’s a function of guys want to make their impact on the game, guys want to come and show how aggressive they’re going to be.
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Texas governor lifts mask mandate and declares: ‘It’s time to open 100%’

By Alexandra Villarreal
  • With less than 7% of Texans fully vaccinated and another Covid-19 surge potentially imminent, Texas is flinging open businesses to full capacity while simultaneously ending its highly politicized mask mandate, the state’s governor, Greg Abbott, announced on Tuesday.
  • In Mississippi – another Republican stronghold – Governor Tate Reeves also announced on Tuesday that the state was lifting rules for businesses and doing away with county mask mandates.
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Biden: US ‘on track’ to have enough vaccines for all adults by May

  • With the bolstered supply, Biden also announced he would be using the powers of the federal government to direct all states to prioritize vaccinating teachers and said the federal government would provide the doses directly through its pharmacy program.
  • Joe Biden has said that the US expects to have enough coronavirus vaccines for all adults by the end of May, two months earlier than anticipated, as his administration announced that the drugmaker Merck would help produce Johnson & Johnson’s newly approved shot.
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Storey County opposes independent government for smart city

  • The rural county where a cryptocurrency firm wants to build a self-governing smart city voted Tuesday to oppose a key part of Gov. Steve Sisolak’s proposal to allow tech companies to create county-like governments .
  • Mitchell took issue with language in the current draft of proposal that states that the traditional local government model is “inadequate alone to provide the flexibility and resources conducive to making the State a leader in attracting and retaining new forms and types of businesses and fostering economic development in emerging technologies and innovative industries.”
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Biden expects enough vaccine for all US adults by end of May

  • WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden said Tuesday that the U.S. expects to take delivery of enough coronavirus vaccines for all adults by the end of May, two months earlier than anticipated, as his administration announced that drugmaker Merck & Co. will help produce rival Johnson & Johnson’s newly approved shot.
  • With the bolstered supply, Biden also announced he would be using the powers of the federal government to direct all states to prioritize vaccinating teachers, and said the federal government would provide the doses directly through its pharmacy program.
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Tarrant County to lift local mask mandate immediately; Dallas County judge calls Abbott’s decision ‘unfortunate’

  • DALLAS — Local and state leaders across Texas had a lot to say about Gov. Greg Abbott's Tuesday announcement that he would rescind the statewide face mask order and lift most business restrictions starting next Wednesday, March 10.
  • In Tarrant County, leaders said they were lifting the local mask mandate for businesses following the governor's decision.
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A coronavirus variant by any other name … please

By BENJAMIN MUELLER and Apoorva Mandavilli

20H/501Y.V2. VOC 202012/02. B. 1.351. Those were the charming names that scientists proposed for a new variant of the coronavirus that was identified in South Africa. The convoluted strings of letters, numbers and dots are deeply meaningful for the scientists who devised them, but how was anyone else supposed to keep them straight? Even the […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Audit: Program to diversify Minnesota teachers difficult to assess

By Anthony Lonetree
  • Most college graduates who benefited from a grant program aimed at increasing the number of teachers of color in Minnesota later became public school teachers, a legislative auditor's report said Tuesday.
  • PELSB should, the auditor said, standardize and improve its data collection to provide a better picture of the race and ethnicity of teacher candidates and licensed teachers.
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Virus variant in Brazil infected many who had already recovered from COVID-19

By Carl Zimmer
In just a matter of weeks, two variants of the coronavirus have become so familiar that you can hear their inscrutable alphanumeric names regularly uttered on television news. B.1.1.7, first identified in Britain, has demonstrated the power to spread far and fast. In South Africa, a mutant called B.1.351 can dodge human antibodies, blunting the effectiveness of some vaccines. Scientists have also had their eye on a third concerning variant that arose in Brazil, called P.1. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Ticker: Online alcohol deliveries soared in pandemic; State jacking up fees for fishing, hunting

By Boston Herald Wire Services
  • For the first time in 25 years, MassWildlife is proposing to increase its freshwater fishing, hunting and trapping license fees, a move the agency says would make up for declines in the number of licenses purchased.
  • Under the proposal, which will be subject to three public hearings this month, a fishing license for a Massachusetts resident would increase from $22.50 per year to $40 and the cost of the necessary licenses and permits to hunt bear, turkey, pheasant, waterfowl, small game and deer would climb from $47.70 to $160.
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Lawmakers propose 5-year extension of Maine’s lobster marketing group

By Hannah LaClaire
  • Dustin Delano, lobsterman, board member and vice president of the Maine Lobstermen’s Association, said the industry can’t afford to lose the organization’s contribution, especially after last year and ahead of the changes expected to come from a number of proposed measures intended to reduce risk to the critically endangered North Atlantic right whale by up to 98 percent.
  • Maile Buker, vice president of marketing for Hannaford Supermarkets and member of the collaborative, said the grocery store chain sold roughly 1.3 million pounds of Maine lobster in 2020, a 175 percent increase from the year before.
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Travis County turned to Mexico for water as supply ran low amid winter storms

  • Travis County spokesman Hector Nieto said County Judge Andy Brown received a call from a friend during the week of Feb. 14 who offered to donate five trucks of water through a connection with a beverage company in Monterrey, Mexico.
  • The international delivery came as taps in Austin and surrounding communities – and in other parts of Texas – ran dry after water plants lost power and the region suffered massive water main breaks.
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Massachusetts coronavirus vaccine rollout: 44,340 more doses given as J&J vax arrives

By Rick Sobey
  • After Tuesday’s count of 980 new virus cases, the seven-day average of Massachusetts’ confirmed cases is now 1,116 cases, significantly down from 6,241 cases in the first week of January.
  • Massachusetts health officials on Tuesday reported that more than 44,000 coronavirus vaccine doses were administered during the most recent day of vax data, as the first doses of the Johnson & Johnson vax arrived in Boston.
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Maine educators, President Biden call for teacher vaccinations

By Gillian Graham
  • The Maine Education Association continued its calls this week for the state to prioritize vaccinations for high-risk school staff, saying educators face increasing stress and anxiety about their own safety as well as growing pressure to increase in-person learning.
  • Commissioner Jeanne Lambrew of the Maine Department of Health and Human Services said Tuesday that more information about dedicated clinics for school staff and teachers will be released later this week.
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Live A Little: Meet Dianne and Jake

  • This unlikely pair have been friends for seven years, matched through Big Brothers Big Sisters of East Tennessee, and though they are generations apart, they have more in common than what meets the eye.
  • KNOXVILLE, Tenn — Dianne and Jake are getting to see each other in-person more these days, but the pandemic has kept them apart for much of the past year.
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How To Build An Artificial Heart

  • Throughout the eighties and nineties, even as he helped with the HeartMate and AbioCor, Frazier argued that engineers should shift from pulsatile pump designs to ones based on the more mechanically straightforward principle of “continuous flow”—the strategy that Bivacor later adopted.
  • “Recently, I went to a birthday party for a guy I transplanted thirty years ago,” Frazier said.
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Biden vows enough vaccine for all US adults by end of May

By ZEKE MILLER, LINDA A. JOHNSON and JONATHAN LEMIRE
  • WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden said Tuesday that the U.S. expects to take delivery of enough coronavirus vaccines for all adult Americans by the end of May, two months earlier than anticipated, as his administration announced that drugmaker Merck & Co. will help produce rival Johnson & Johnson's newly approved shot.
  • On a call with governors Tuesday, White House coronavirus coordinator Jeff Zients said states should prepare for administering 16-17 million total weekly doses of Pfizer and Moderna vaccines by the end of March, climbing to 17-18 million weekly by early April.
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A Vision For Agriculture

  • Decades of research has shown that, in all grasslands, proper stocking and grazing management can build healthy soils, protect water quality, provide wildlife habitat and promote future yields of nutritious feed for livestock.
  • While a small proportion, about 20 per cent of Wisconsin dairy farms, use grazed pasture to feed milk cows and heifers, the vast majority of cattle in Wisconsin are confined and fed on rations coming from a landscape dominated by annual grains.
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New program helps Chicagoans manage debt, find aid — and it’s free

By Manny Ramos
  • Financial navigators like Carolina Guzman go over residents’ debt, income and puts them on a financial plan while also finding social programs to help pay for things like utility bills and rent.
  • The Financial Navigator program, launched in mid-February, is designed around a free 30-minute phone call that advises people on which bills to target and shows them how to maximize their income.
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The Essential Fly

  • He’s part of a team investigating the role that flies play in pollinating crops and whether, like honeybees, they might be managed to improve yields.
  • The vast majority of pollination studies have focused on bees, and although many species of flies have been reported visiting crops, in most cases little is known about how good they are at transporting pollen, let alone whether their visits translate into more fruit and vegetables.
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Biden: US on track to possibly have vaccines for all adults in the country by end of May

  • President Joe Biden said Tuesday during a White House press conference that the U.S. is now on track to deliver enough coronavirus vaccines for all adult Americans by the end of May.
  • Speaking from the White House, Biden said he learned when he took office that Johnson & Johnson "was behind in manufacturing and production" of its vaccine and produced only 3.9 million doses ahead of its receiving emergency use authorization on Saturday.
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MN grant program ‘largely unsuccessful’ at producing teachers of color, Legislative Auditor finds

By Josh Verges
  • The audit examined what happened in the grant program between 2016 and 2020, during which 10 colleges spent $2.85 million on 590 teaching candidates.
  • A 24-year-old grant program aimed at increasing the racial diversity of Minnesota’s teaching force isn’t making much of a difference, according to the program’s first in-depth study.
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Compromise emerging on Minnesota tax relief package

By Dana Ferguson
  • “We are in an unusual time, we need to get this bill moving,” said Senate Tax Committee Chairwoman Carla Nelson, R-Rochester, who is supporting tacking on an amendment exempting some of the additional unemployment benefits.
  • Businesses that pulled down federal Paycheck Protection Program loans and Minnesotans who received additional weekly unemployment insurance benefits last year could see tax relief under a proposal getting pieced together in the Legislature.
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Right-to-know protections get favorable recommendations from House lawmakers

  • Among its actions, the committee voted to approve medical monitoring claims to be against companies found at fault for PFAS pollution; approve a ban on the state from using surveillance cameras to track cars or pedestrians on roads or sidewalks; and recommended to kill a bill allowing lawsuits against social media companies for censorship;
  • At one point, the committee voted to recommend killing House Bill 133, which would allow citizens to sue social media companies in state courts over censorship concerns.
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From Britney to Buffy, We’re Suddenly Rethinking Postfeminist Pop Culture—and Nothing Could Be Healthier

By Judy Berman
  • Whether you attribute them to a 20-year nostalgia cycle, a new wave of feminism or both, these blasts from the recent past add up to a larger reckoning with how pop culture treated women a generation ago.
  • A few days after Framing Britney Spears debuted, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel actor Charisma Carpenter spoke out about what she called abuses of power on the part of the shows’ creator, Joss Whedon, touching off a new wave of mourning among fans who’ve been hearing reports of vicious behavior on Whedon’s part for years now, and for whom Buffy had long ago become a symbol of empowered femininity.
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Deployment of fentanyl reversal kit likely saved deputy’s life, sheriff says

  • YORK -- A York County deputy deployed a Narcan kit -- which quickly reverses the effects of opioid emergencies -- and likely saved the life of a fellow law officer during a traffic stop.
  • York County Sheriff Paul Vrbka holds Narcan kits, which are provided to all the law enforcement officers in the sheriff’s department.
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Chicago Catholic Schools Supt. Jim Rigg to resign

By Nader Issa
  • “On behalf of the School Board and entire Archdiocese of Chicago, we are grateful to Dr. Rigg for his dedication to Catholic education and to our students over the past five years and for his collaborative leadership during challenging times,” the Archdiocese wrote.
  • The superintendent of the Chicago Archdiocese’s Catholic Schools is resigning, church leaders announced Tuesday, less than six years after he took the role and amid a pandemic that continues to challenge schools.
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What Happened To Jordan Peterson?

  • As a student, he visited a maximum-security prison, where he was particularly struck by a convict with a vicious scar right down his chest, which he surmised might have come from surgery or an ax wound: “The injury would have killed a lesser man, anyway—someone like me.”
  • The mystery deepens: What really happened to Jordan Peterson, and why has he come back for more?
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2021 Bridge Crossing Jubilee – Schedule of Events

As Alabama News Network has reported, the coronavirus pandemic has forced most of the Bridge Crossing Jubilee events in Selma to become virtual for 2021. But the remembrance of Bloody Sunday will go on. The major events will take place Friday through Sunday, leading up to the virtual bridge crossing on Sunday afternoon. The King Unity Breakfast will be held in-person, but will take place as a drive-in event in the parking lot at Wallace Community College. SCHEDULE OF EVENTSREGISTERUNITY BREAKFAST – TICKETS $25 The Bridge Crossing Jubilee remembers March 7, 1965, which has become known as Bloody Sunday because marchers who crossed the Edmund […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Utah lawmakers shave a billion off plan to invest in infrastructure over fear of too much debt

By Katie McKellar
  • The substitute, put forth by bill sponsor House Majority Leader Mike Schultz, R-Hooper, would also increase the amount of one-time money for infrastructure projects to nearly $1 billion, up from about $823 million from general fund revenues.
  • Senate President Stuart Adams, R-Layton, while discussing the new proposal in a media availability Tuesday morning, said the new plan still means big spending for the state’s roads, economic development and rural areas.
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Lake St. Croix Beach: Public hearing on controversial ordinance postponed

By Mary Divine
A public hearing on a Lake St. Croix Beach proposal that would allow in-law apartments within a special St. Croix Riverway district has been postponed due to a clerical error. The city’s planning commission on April 5 is scheduled to hold a public hearing on the proposed ordinance that would amend the city’s zoning regulations in the riverway district to add accessory apartments as an allowable use in a single-family residential zone. City officials say in-law apartments already exist in the “riverway overlay zone,” an area about a quarter-mile out from the river’s edge that has certain building restrictions designed to protect the scenic […]Read more >Similar articles >
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How to ask patients for their pronouns

By Letters to the Editor
  • I empathize with medical student Lala Tanmoy Das’s struggle to find common ground with both his transgender and gender-nonconforming and cisgender patients when, during a medical encounter, he inquires what pronouns they use.
  • Practitioner-to-patient communications rarely require the use of third-person pronouns.
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Why a Debate on the Minimum Wage Could Spark a D.C. Meltdown

By Philip Elliott
  • Frustrated, progressives in the House are now openly calling for Democrats in the Senate to either overrule the parliamentarian’s ruling or do away with the filibuster, which would allow them to pass the relief bill through the Senate with the minimum wage hike by a simple majority.
  • Because Republicans are refusing to go along, Democrats planned to use a budget gimmick to let them avoid a filibuster and pass it into law with a slim 50-vote majority, plus the backing of Vice President Kamala Harris.
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Wisconsin supply of new vaccine will dip after next week

By SCOTT BAUER
  • — Teachers will be prioritized to receive the first shipment of about 48,000 doses of the one-shot Johnson & Johnson coronavirus vaccine coming to Wisconsin next week, a bolster in supply that won't be matched again for several weeks, the state's deputy health secretary said Tuesday.
  • About 30% of Wisconsin public school districts — 131 out of 421 — will be done vaccinating teachers by March 15, said Julie Willems Van Dyke, deputy secretary of the Wisconsin Department of Health Services.
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Biden: US will be able to vaccinate all adults by end of May

By ZEKE MILLER and LINDA A. JOHNSON
  • WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden said Tuesday that the U.S. expects to take delivery of enough coronavirus vaccines for all adult Americans by the end of May, two months earlier than anticipated, as his administration announced that drugmaker Merck & Co. will help produce rival Johnson & Johnson's newly approved shot.
  • On a call with governors Tuesday, White House coronavirus coordinator Jeff Zients said states should prepare for administering 16-17 million total weekly doses of Pfizer and Moderna vaccines by the end of March, climbing to 17-18 million weekly by early April.
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From the Editor: Fans of the Cowdog

By Dan Goodgame
  • Christian first pitched a story about Erickson and Hank five years ago but says he couldn’t drum up much interest until he had two more of the author’s fans on the staff: Lauren, and me.
  • Erickson, creator of Hank the Cowdog, when the author delivered a reading in Christian’s hometown of Andrews, in West Texas.
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Lisa Berreau and Kathleen Riebe: The value of undergraduate research for Utah college students

By Lisa Berreau and Kathleen Riebe | Special to The Tribune
  • Utah State University undergraduates met last month with Utah legislators to share research projects they’ve completed this year.
  • USU undergraduate research stands shoulder-to-shoulder with the work of graduate student and faculty colleagues in importance and quality, and their project results are improving their current disciplines and future industries.
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Backpack battle: Colorado’s Osprey sues California retailer over branding

By Shelly Bradbury
A California clothing company is ripping off Colorado outdoor gear maker Osprey’s branding in violation of a trademark agreement between the two companies, Osprey claimed in a federal lawsuit filed Monday. The company, which is headquartered in Cortez and makes hiking packs and gear, claims the California company, Aether, is selling Aether-branded backpacks despite a 2019 agreement between the two companies that it would not do so. Osprey has used “Aether” to brand its backpacks for more than two decades, the complaint says. “Osprey has invested a substantial amount of time, money and effort to promote and advertise its backpacks under the […]Read more >Similar articles >
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High court weighing whether Arizona law was meant to suppress minority votes

By Howard Fischer Capitol Media Services
  • Chief Justice John Roberts specifically asked attorney Jessica Ring Amunson why that report by the commission that Carter co-chaired does not provide enough reason for lawmakers to ban ballot harvesting.
  • She represents Arizona Secretary of State Katie Hobbs, a Democrat, who has taken the position that both the ban on ballot harvesting and the prohibition on counting votes cast in the wrong precinct violate federal law.
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Why Fox News is having a day-long meltdown over Dr. Seuss

By Aaron Rupar
  • It's just 10AM and Fox News has already had 8 segments on Dr. Seuss "quite literally being canceled" [Narrator: He wasn't] pic.twitter.com/uSHnBT8sXn
  • A Fox News reporter asked White House press secretary Jen Psaki a question during Tuesday’s briefing about why Biden didn’t mention Dr. Seuss in his statement commemorating Read Across America Day, and Fox News then tried to spin Psaki’s response (she referred the reporter to the Department of Education) as some sort of scandal.
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Utah commemorative state flag proposal could be in trouble because of concern by Democrats, others

By Bethany Rodgers
  • But with just days to go in the legislative session, Democratic state lawmakers are saying they’ve been disturbed to discover that a few social media accounts associated with the controversial DezNat hashtag have embraced one of Martin’s flag designs.
  • “In its own way, it’ll make people feel better,” said Martin, chairman of Organization for a New Utah Flag .
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Maryland won’t receive more Johnson & Johnson vaccines for a few weeks, Gov. Hogan says

  • The federal government says unfortunately, states won’t be seeing more Johnson & Johnson COVID vaccine doses for a few weeks, as they've shipped all available doses.
  • However, officials said there will be no Johnson & Johnson vaccines shipping to the states in the next few weeks due to the federal government shipping out all doses they had immediately.
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Why are Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos so interested in space?

By Kara Swisher
  • Mr. Bezos, who is stepping down as chief executive of Amazon this year, is expected to accelerate his space-travel efforts through his company Blue Origin, whose tag line reads, in part, "Earth, in all its beauty, is just our starting place."
  • Like SpaceX, Blue Origin is working on payload launches and reusable orbital launch vehicles, as well as on moon landing technology, to achieve what Mr. Bezos once called "low-cost access to space." Blue Origin executives said recently that the company is close to blasting off into space with humans.
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Colorado set to begin receiving roughly twice as many coronavirus vaccine doses starting in April

  • Colorado is set to begin receiving roughly twice as many weekly doses of coronavirus vaccine starting in April compared to what the state is allotted now as production ramps up and the newly approved Johnson & Johnson vaccine is widely distributed.
  • Starting the week of April 11, Colorado is forecast to receive more than 400,000 weekly doses of coronavirus vaccine.
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Biden says U.S. will have enough vaccines for 300 million Americans by end of May

By Ursula Perano
President Biden on Tuesday said that ramped-up coronavirus vaccine production will provide enough doses for 300 million Americans by the end May. Why it matters: That’s two months sooner than Biden’s previous promise of enough vaccines for all American adults by the end of July.The accelerated timeline also comes on the heels of pharmaceutical manufacturer Merck teaming up with Johnson & Johnson to quickly produce its one-shot COVID-19 vaccine. J&J’s vaccine received its emergency use authorization last Saturday, joining Pfizer and Moderna on the vaccine market.The big picture: Coronavirus cases and deaths have […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Andrew S. Weyrich and Richard R. Orlandi: U’s COVID-19 testing program is making our community safer

By Andrew S. Weyrich and Richard R. Orlandi | Special to The Tribune
  • At the center of our ability to do this is one of the university’s extraordinary scientific facilities, the Health Sciences Center Sequencing Core laboratory, which pivoted from its pre-pandemic work analyzing genetic material for research to processing saliva samples full time to detect evidence of the virus that causes COVID-19.
  • The Sequencing Core Laboratory is one of more than 25 facilities on our campus that provides expert staff and specialized technology to students and faculty, enabling them to conduct world-class research.
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D.C. expands paid leave: Two weeks to mourn a child, but no parental leave after stillbirths

By Julie Zauzmer
  • The D.C. government will expand bereavement leave for public employees who lose a child, but will not broaden the more generous leave to include the loss of other family members, as some city lawmakers had advocated .
  • The bill was inspired by Elizabeth O’Donnell, a D.C. public school teacher who raised awareness of the city’s lack of leave for parents who lose a child after her daughter Aaliyah Denise was stillborn at seven months.
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Congress-created commission calls for spending billions on artificial intelligence to defeat China

By Ryan Lovelace
  • The National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence’s final report to Congress urges the federal government to prioritize artificial intelligence innovation now and spend billions of taxpayer dollars or risk getting left behind in China’s dust.
  • The commission said it worried that only the largest technology companies and largest countries have the resources to make artificial intelligence breakthroughs and called for $40 billion in government spending now as a “modest down payment” on future developments.
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Minnesota company’s product trick to scraping ice from your driveway

By John Ewoldt
  • Invented by Dave Young of Grand Forks, N.D., the flexible steel blade is designed to remove snow and ice compacted from foot and vehicle traffic.
  • For nearly 20 years, Svobodny has sold an ice removal tool that he calls "the best one we sell." The Ultimate Scraper isn't fancy, but some local hardware store operators and commercial snow and ice removal contractors wouldn't be without it.
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Biden promises enough Covid-19 vaccines to inoculate all adult Americans by the end of May

By Nicholas Florko
  • W ASHINGTON — President Biden pledged Tuesday that the federal government will have enough doses of the coronavirus vaccine to inoculate all adult Americans by the end of May.
  • The Biden administration has stood up a number of efforts to help states get shots in arms, including mobilizing the Federal Emergency Management Agency to set up mass vaccination sites.
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The strongest fishing knots you can tie

By John Merwin/Field & Stream
  • For this test, I tied 10-pound Seaguar InvizX fluorocarbon to 10-pound Trilene Big Game monofilament, purposefully going with lines of similar diameters to simulate a common use of fluoro, such as in tying on a leader when fishing for heavily pressured steelhead or walleyes in clear water.
  • I tested the strength of at least three or four different splicing knots for each of three line combinations to find what worked best.
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Brewers Fest won’t return to Portland until ’22

PORTLAND, Ore. (KOIN) — The Oregon Brewers Festival has decided to cancel their annual gathering at the Portland waterfront for the second year in a row due to the pandemic. They posted the announcement on Facebook, saying they will return July 27-30 2022. "Until then, stay safe and support your local pubs, breweries, and cider houses. We miss you all, and we look forward to seeing you next year, cheers!" Like nearly all mass gatherings, Brewers Fest also canceled in 2020. It’s unclear what other summer festivals will take place in Portland this year. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Concord looks to fully reopen schools by fall, perhaps sooner

  • At the Concord School Board Monday night, Murphy said she’s been thinking ahead to the district’s next steps, and believes it is time to begin planning for in-person learning five days a week in the fall, and possibly as early as May 3.
  • But Murphy says she hopes to increase in-person education to five days a week as soon as it is safe to do so, to begin doing the “make-up” work necessary to get kids back on their learning targets.
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Lack of paperwork for free lunches could cost N.H. school districts millions

  • New Hampshire school districts are worried about losing funds for the Free and Reduced Lunch program, as administrators say fewer families are filling out the necessary paperwork, which is still required to determine aid, and is creating a false perception of lower enrollment.
  • MacLean estimates, based on a report the district got from the Department of Education, the enrollment drop could cost Merrimack Valley $485,091 in aid for free and reduced lunch, while Andover could lose $107,275.
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Dallas Co. Drug Program Gets $50,000 Grant Assisting Parents with Retaining, Regaining Custody of Kids

  • The grant would enable the Dallas County Family Drug Court to conduct screening and undertake other measures to ensure that people who have had substance abuse problems remain drug free as part of a requirement to keep their children at home with them.
  • “Children in most cases want to be in the home with their parents, and the Dallas County Family Drug Court is willing to make that happen under certain conditions,” Gov. Ivey said.
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Fox News gets huge ratings boost during Trump’s CPAC speech

  • But this Sunday, boosted by days of right-wing media hype about Trump’s star turn at CPAC, Fox News averaged 1.4 million viewers at 2 p.m., rising to 2.5 million in the 3 p.m. hour, when Trump was originally slated to speak.
  • The ratings for Fox News Channel, which have been relatively weak since Trump lost the election last November, spiked Sunday afternoon when he was scheduled to address the CPAC convention in Orlando, Florida.
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Utah Senate approves bill to end gas chamber euthanasia for animals in the state

By Taylor Stevens
  • The Utah Senate voted unanimously Tuesday in favor of a bill that would end gas chamber euthanasia for animals in the state, while a second proposal relating to animal welfare — this one to ban “puppy mills” that opponents say sell poorly-treated pets — stalled in a House committee.
  • The proposal from House Minority Leader Brian King, D-Salt Lake City, sought to prohibit pet stores in the state from selling a “companion animal,” like a dog or a cat, as part of an effort to end so-called puppy mills.
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White House: Merck to help produce rival J&J’s vaccine

By ZEKE MILLER and LINDA A. JOHNSON
  • WASHINGTON — Drugmaker Merck & Co. will help produce rival Johnson & Johnson's newly approved coronavirus vaccine in an effort to expand supply more quickly, the White House said Tuesday.
  • White House press secretary Jen Psaki also announced Tuesday that the federal government was increasing supply of the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines to states next week to 15.2 million doses per week, up from 14.5 million previously.
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Nursing Homes See 82% COVID Decline Since Vaccine Rollout

By Jeff Gardner

Today, the American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living released a report detailing a steady decline in nursing home COVID cases since vaccines began to be administered in mid-December. As of March 2, nursing homes in the US have seen the lowest number of new COVID cases since the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services started tracking cases in May 2020. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Former DFL lawmaker, ex-city employee Kate Knuth announces she’s running for Minneapolis mayor

By Faiza Mahamud
  • In an interview Tuesday, Knuth, an environmental educator and a former three-term DFL legislator, said she decided to run because of what she calls Frey's lack of leadership and the absence of other candidates who can bring together a broad coalition to help move the city forward.
  • Frey's campaign manager Joe Radinovich, said the mayor has dedicated his time working with the community to implement "meaningful" policy changes in the police department and "guiding Minneapolis residents and businesses through a public safety flashpoint."
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RARE SIGHT: Here’s a look at the documents behind Texas Independence Day

By Todd Bailey
  • “[Texas'] Declaration of Independence really is one of the most significant documents in our collection, because it does outline how the founders felt about liberty, about government, about what they wanted from their own country and establishing that,” Price said.
  • Their archives are accessible online in the Texas Digital Archive along with more than five million other state records documenting the work of the government.
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The COVID-19 Pandemic’s Impact on Global CO2 Emissions Didn’t Last Very Long

By Jeffrey Kluger
  • According to a report released March 2 by the International Energy Agency, 2020 on the whole saw a total drop-off in global CO2 emissions of 6%—the largest annual decline since World War II—keeping almost 2 billion tons of planet-warming gasses out of the sky.
  • China, the world’s largest emitter of greenhouse gasses and the first country hit by the pandemic, went into lockdown in February, resulting in its CO2 output falling by 12% compared to the same month a year prior.
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Raiders, SafeNest partner on domestic violence education

  • The official health care partner of the Las Vegas Raiders has pledged $500,000 to help SafeNest provide student athletes and coaches in Clark County with education about domestic and sexual violence.
  • Intermountain’s donation will help the nonprofit launch Coaching Boys Into Men and Athletes as Leaders — “two incredible programs that support important relationships between high school coaches and their athletes, and that leverages that space to have conversations of consequence, conversations that build respect for ourselves and respect for others,” said SafeNest CEO Liz Ortenburger.
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CMA Fest canceled for second year in a row due to COVID-19 concerns

  • Organizers said it just wasn't safe to bring fans from all over the world to one place right now due to COVID-19.
  • "We know our fans near and far have hoped that the festival could safely return this summer, and while we are encouraged to see COVID-19 vaccines becoming more widely available, we still face several challenges that prevent us from bringing our fans around the world the CMA Fest experience they have come to expect," organizers said in a statement.
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UM-Morris chancellor to retire after four years on job

By Josh Verges
After four years on the job, Chancellor Michelle Behr will retire at the end of this school year, the University of Minnesota-Morris announced Tuesday. Behr was provost at Birmingham-Southern College before joining Morris in February 2017. Janet Schrunk Ericksen, Morris’s vice chancellor for academic affairs and dean, will step in as acting chancellor on June 25.Related Articles Billboard hopes to bring needed kidney donation to beloved Minnesota man ‘Exciting times’: UMN and NASA alum, 81, watches historic Mars mission University of Minnesota to establish center for anti-racism health research UMN makes tuition free for students from […]Read more >Similar articles >