Apr 18, 2021

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Psilocybin’s complicated relationship with creativity revealed in new placebo-controlled neuroimaging study

By Eric W. Dolan
  • People under the influence of psilocybin — the active component of magic mushrooms — report having more profound and original thoughts, but tend to score lower on cognitive tests of creative ability, according to new research published in Translational Psychiatry .
  • “Over the years, a number of anecdotal reports have accumulated suggesting that the consumption of psychedelic drugs, like LSD and psilocybin, can enhance creativity,” Mason said.
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Nonreactivity and acting with awareness help explain the positive effects of mindfulness on relationship functioning

By Christian Rigg
  • Specifically, nonreactivity related to one’s own and one’s partner’s reports of overall quality in the relationship, while a women’s own and their partner’s ability to act with awareness both boosted women’s reports of sexual satisfaction.
  • The few studies that have looked at the effects of mindfulness on relationships and sexual satisfaction have suffered from homogenous population samples, which greatly limits their generalizability.
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NHS targets middle-aged men with online diabetes risk quiz

By Matthew Weaver

Campaign in England intended in part to prevent Covid deaths among those with type 2 diabetes

Middle-aged men in England are to be encouraged to take a short online quiz to test their vulnerability to type 2 diabetes, as part of an NHS campaign partly intended to prevent more Covid deaths.

The “know your risk” quiz, developed by Diabetes UK, asks seven questions about weight, height and waist size to establish a body mass index or BMI. Users are also asked whether any of their relatives have had diabetes. Results are given four bands from low to high risk.

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Trial to study effect of immune system on Covid reinfection

By Nicola Davis Science correspondent
  • The first human challenge trials for Covid began this year, with the study – a partnership led by researchers at Imperial College London among others – initially looking at the smallest amount of virus needed to cause infection among people who have not had Covid before.
  • The immune response needed to protect people against reinfection with the coronavirus will be explored in a new human challenge trial, researchers have revealed.
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Gene That Could Help Prevent or Delay Onset of Alzheimer’s Disease Identified

By Neuroscience News
  • Findings of a study by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, suggest that increasing expression of a gene known as ABCC1 could not only reduce the deposition of a hard plaque in the brain that leads to Alzheimer’s disease, but might also prevent or delay this memory-robbing disease from developing.
  • TGen’s study results suggest that ABCC1 is a valid drug target for Alzheimer’s because of the multiple ways the gene influences Abeta; not only potentially exporting it from the brain, but also in the way it modulates cellular processes involving amyloid precursor protein (APP), which is abundant in the brain and can be cut up into smaller pieces via the alpha- or beta-secretase pathways.
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Estrogen Status, Not Sex, Protects Against Heightened Fear Recall

By Neuroscience News
  • Cameron Carter, MD, Editor of Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, said of the work: “This study sheds light on the well-known differences between men and women in their vulnerability to anxiety disorders and shows that aspects of fear learning and extinction that contribute to vulnerability in women are related to differences in estrogen levels.”
  • Mr. Bierwirth said: “We found stronger peripheral fear expression (via SCR) during fear recall and extinction recall under low-E2 conditions, that is, in men and in OC women, compared to mid-cycle women with higher E2 levels.
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No Increase In Brain Health Problems in Middle Age for Men Who Played Football in High School

By Neuroscience News
  • Summary: Study reveals there is no significant uptick in men who played high school football reporting problems with brain health in middle age compared to their peers who did not play sports.
  • Decades after their days on the gridiron, middle-aged men who played football in high school are not experiencing greater problems with concentration, memory, or depression compared to men who did not play football, reports a study in Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine .
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New research provides insight into the tactics women use when competitively flirting against other women

By Eric W. Dolan
  • “The third author of the current study was talking to me after a class session focused on flirting and she asked me a question about how women competitively flirt with other women for men’s attention in a mate relevant situation, and I told her I was not aware of any research that had examined the topic.
  • After analyzing the responses, the researchers ended up with a list of 11 nonverbal flirtatious actions: “eye contact, dancing in his line of sight, smiling at him, touching him, giggling at his jokes, butting in between the other woman and the man, showing distaste for her (i.e., glaring, eye rolls, frowning), brushing against him, hugging him, flirting with other men, and waving to him.”
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The missing link in the vaccine chain: caregivers

By Romilla Batra, MD, MBA
  • And yet, if we are going to finish the job of vaccinating all of the older members of our community, it’s essential that we place newfound emphasis on a group of people who will likely determine whether the remaining holdouts get their shots: family caregivers.
  • A new survey of family caregivers shows that their own mistrust of vaccines could explain why close to a quarter of older Americans have not yet received their potentially life-saving vaccine shots.
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NHS England chair faces demands to explain role in Greensill lobbying

By Denis Campbell Health policy editor

Calls for clarity about Lord Prior’s involvement with Greensill as former PM David Cameron is under fire

The Tory peer who chairs NHS England is facing demands to explain why he helped arrange for Greensill Capital to lobby senior health service bosses, with Labour branding his role “shocking”.

Lord Prior of Brampton is facing questions over a meeting he organised between the now collapsed finance firm’s founder Lex Greensill and the overall boss of the NHS and its chief financial officer.

Related: What is the Greensill lobbying scandal and who is involved?

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‘The worst it’s ever been’: Guardian readers tell us about Australia’s mental health system

By Rafqa Touma and Natasha May
  • “ I am currently not supported by a psychologist because the last one told me there was nothing more she could do for me, and could not find anyone with the expertise to help me who had openings … I have called the Crisis Team for mental health at the local hospital on two occasions.
  • In more than 700 responses we heard from those suffering from mental health issues, their families and friends, as well as the professionals working in the field, including GPs, psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers and policymakers.
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‘Like hunting for unicorns’: Australians on the search for adequate, affordable mental healthcare

By Melissa Davey
  • M any Australians experience the country’s mental health system as inadequate, dangerous and financially punishing, saying they often feel unsafe in hospitals, are dismissed by health professionals and are hit with prohibitive costs that government subsidies do not come close to covering.
  • The Orygen youth mental health service in Victoria says the “missing middle” refers to those who “are often too unwell for primary care but not unwell enough for state-based services”.
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Mental ill-health is a bigger threat to university students than Covid | Letter

By Letters
  • The mental health of our students is now a real concern and I worry about how many more young people will be affected before the government allows these people back to fulfil their potential.
  • Students should have been returning to their studies on campus over the next two weeks, but universities have now been told they cannot return to face-to-face teaching until 17 May ( Report, 13 April).
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I’m Awash In Pandemic-Fueled Gratitude and Taking a Solitary Cross-Country Road Trip

By Susanna Schrobsdorff
  • And if those grandparents and teenagers sorting packages at work, those parents buying groceries, and young men driving home to their moms are all part of our family, our human family, then changing what’s not working becomes a labor of love, not fury.
  • With the waitlists for the nearby shelter and housing support backed up, the local Pandemic of Love chapter stepped in to rally the community and make sure Charmaine did not fall through the cracks any longer.
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The world needs a patent waiver on Covid vaccines. Why is the UK blocking it? | Gabriel Scally

By Gabriel Scally
  • By helping block a patent waiver, the UK government is stifling vaccine production, which means many countries will wait years for sufficient doses.
  • Public health voices have already warned that if we don’t rapidly vaccinate the world’s population, our current generation of Covid-19 vaccines could be rendered ineffective within a year.
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Cheer up! The happiness guru on how to feel better

By Jamie Waters

Meik Wiking is a world expert on what makes us feel happier. So, is there a simple fix?

Just like that, one of the world’s foremost happiness boffins beams into my living room with a megawatt grin and an infectious chuckle. Even though Meik Wiking (pronounced “Mike Viking”) is moving house on the day of our interview – surely up there with the most exasperating life events – spirits are high for the bestselling author, public speaker and CEO of the Happiness Research Institute in Copenhagen.

There are removal boxes “everywhere”, he says, but in the Zoom square on my computer all I can see is a handsome Dane with surfer hair and black-rimmed specs flanked by minimalist furniture and a luminous pot plant. Denmark famously ranks among the world’s happiest nations and it’s tough to think of a better poster boy for the land of cheer.

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Birmingham launches taskforce as babies die at twice national rate

By Jessica Murray
  • A taskforce is being set up to tackle baby deaths in Birmingham, after a report revealed infant mortality rates in the city are nearly twice the national average, with families from Pakistani backgrounds disproportionately affected.
  • Death rates are highest in the areas of the city with the worst deprivation, a key issue in Birmingham where 28.1% of children live in low-income families compared with 17% nationally.
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Cicada awakening

By Peter Attia
  • Around the time I was planning to get married (and planning for the possibility of additional cicada headcount at the reception) I read this article in the Baltimore Sun. I remember the article 17 years later because of how fascinated I was by the evolutionary enigma that is the periodical cicada genus named Magicicada, comprising 7 species with either a 13- or 17-year prime-numbered life cycle.
  • I have two questions, among many, that stand out to me about the life cycles: (1) What drove the two unique 13- or 17-year emergence patterns and (2) Why did the genus settle on the particular number of years that it did?
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Global death toll passes 3m as pandemic ‘grows at an alarming rate’

By Robin McKie Science Editor
  • According to the Covid-19 dashboard, run by Johns Hopkins University, there have been more than 140 million cases of the disease since the pandemic began last year with the official death toll reaching 3,001,068 yesterday morning.
  • Britain, which has also been hit heavily by the disease, has had more than four million cases and has a death toll that currently stands at more than 127,000.
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The obscure maths theorem that governs the reliability of Covid testing

By Tom Chivers
  • The government says – accurately – that the “false positive rate”, the chance of a test returning a positive result in a person who does not have the disease, is less than one in 1,000.
  • And that’s where we came in: you might think that that means, if you’ve had a positive result, that there’s a less than one in 1,000 chance that it’s false.
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I worry constantly about the safety of my grown-up daughters | Dear Mariella

By Mariella Frostrup

The dangers women face make your anxiety understandable, says Mariella Frostrup. However, you must – as we all must – keep worries to a minimum in order to live life

The dilemma I have four lovely children, all now adults and left home. I rarely worry about my sons, but I constantly, constantly fret about my daughters, who both live in shared houses in distant cities.

They are very good about keeping in touch, and sympathetic to my anxiety, but it is reaching unmanageable proportions. For example, if I look at WhatsApp, I might see that one daughter was on it, say, 30 minutes ago, but the other hasn’t been on it all day. I will then look to see when they were last active on Facebook. If she hasn’t been active on Facebook either, I will telephone her.

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >

Australian government considering helping local manufacture of mRNA Covid vaccines

By Josh Taylor and wires
  • The federal health minister, Greg Hunt, said the government was developing a business case to help CSL, which is producing millions of doses of AstraZeneca vaccine, and other companies to switch focus to mRNA vaccines.
  • The Morrison government is actively considering assisting Australian manufacturers to produce mRNA Covid-19 vaccines, such as Pfizer, at scale.
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Australia plans staggered reopening of international borders in second half of year

By Amy Remeikis
  • Scott Morrison says Australia is in “no hurry” to reopen international borders, but vaccinated Australians may be able to travel for “essential” purposes in the second half of the year, with the possibility of quarantining at home on return.
  • “If we can get in a position in the second half of the year Australians for essential purposes can travel and return to the country without going into hotel quarantine, if they have been vaccinated, that is a good incentive to get vaccinated,” Morrison said.
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Virtual Humans Are Equal to Real Ones in Helping People Practice New Leadership Skills

By Neuroscience News
  • That’s the conclusion from new research published in the journal Frontiers in Virtual Reality that evaluated the effectiveness of computer-generated characters in a training scenario compared to real human role-players in a conventional setting.
  • Researchers at the Human Interface Technology Lab New Zealand at the University of Canterbury wanted to find out if computer-generated role-players in virtual and mixed reality settings could provide similar levels of effectiveness to address some of the drawbacks to traditional training techniques.
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‘Deprogramming’ Qanon Followers Ignores Free Will and Why They Adopted the Beliefs in the First Place

By Neuroscience News
  • As a professor of religious studies who has written and taught about alternative religious movements, I believe such deprogramming conversations do little to help us understand why people adopt QAnon beliefs.
  • A deprogramming discourse fails to understand religious recruitment and conversion and excuses those spreading QAnon beliefs from accountability.
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New study sheds light on the interplay between belief in an afterlife and secular-symbolic avenues to immortality

By Eric W. Dolan
  • “At first, we really just set out to test what seemed at the time an intuitive and somewhat simple hypothesis derived from terror management theory: If cultures are or contain our immortality projects, people should be motivated to perceive them as long-lasting, especially when death is salient,” said study author Andy Scott of the University of Alberta.
  • New research suggests that people who don’t believe in the existence of an literal afterlife are more likely to strive for symbolic immortality by fusing their identity with their nation.
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Worldwide COVID-19 death toll tops a staggering 3 million

By David Biller, Associated Press
  • While the campaigns in the U.S. and Britain have hit their stride and people and businesses there are beginning to contemplate life after the pandemic, other places, mostly poorer countries but some rich ones as well, are lagging behind in putting shots in arms and have imposed new lockdowns and other restrictions as virus cases soar.
  • RIO DE JANEIRO — The global death toll from the coronavirus topped a staggering 3 million people Saturday amid repeated setbacks in the worldwide vaccination campaign and a deepening crisis in places such as Brazil, India and France.
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It’s time to reframe second victim syndrome

By Susan Wilson, MD
  • Instead, this concept needs to be reframed; I propose the term “clinician distress syndrome” as a much more accurate portrayal of what is truly happening.
  • The combination of traditional coaching insights with mental fitness allows for sustained change and will lead to the successful empowerment of clinicians in all areas of their practice.
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EMBARGOED Media Alert: Athletes unlikely to develop cardiac complications from COVID, study shows

  • The American Heart Association and the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) joined forces earlier this year to accelerate a critical new research initiative studying cardiac conditions in athletes, in part to speed new insights into the impact of COVID-19 to the cardiovascular system of college athletes and safety of return to play after diagnosis.
  • ORCCA is a national registry, or research database, to track COVID-19 cases and heart-related impacts in NCAA athletes to drive improvements in screening and inform our understanding of cardiac involvement in college athletes who have had COVID-19.
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Tinnitus helpline reports a surge in calls since start of the coronavirus pandemic

By Suzanne Bearne
  • Dr Eldré Beukes, a research fellow in audiology at Anglia Ruskin University, said: “There are two sides to this – people who have got tinnitus now, either from Covid or just during the pandemic, and people with pre-existing tinnitus reporting that it’s worse.
  • The British Tinnitus Association (BTA) has reported a surge in the number of people accessing its services, with a 256% increase in the number of web chats from May to December 2020 compared with the same period in 2019.
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The Coronavirus Pandemic: Tracking Long COVID

By Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Scientists and doctors are working to understand “long COVID” — a lingering range of symptoms that persists in some people after they have initially recovered from COVID-19 illness. Andrew Chan from MGH, Harvard Chan School, and Harvard Medical School, described what we know about long COVID. Included was a discussion about the COVID Symptom Study app, which helps researchers track the onset and progression of symptoms that are self-reported by users. Dr. Chan joined The World’s Elana Gordon for this live online Q&A on April 15, 2021. Presented jointly by The Forum at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and The World […]Read more >Similar articles >

Walking or running in nature with a therapist is helping people heal

By Lisa Buckingham

Outdoor therapy can help people to become reflective and their body language while moving gives clues to their feelings

Covid has transformed the way many of us work and that includes the people who look after our mental health. For much of lockdown, psychotherapists, counsellors, psychologists and psychiatrists have all had to venture into the world of online therapy, tackling their clients’ issues via a computer screen, and often the experience has felt less than ideal for all those involved.

But throughout much of lockdown, another option has become increasingly popular: combining therapy with the benefits of the great outdoors. The British Psychological Society (BPS) issued guidance on this outdoor approach last summer, advising its members on how best to take their work outside, addressing issues such as confidentiality and the absence of a boundaried space. Yet many therapists ditched the four walls and a couch approach a long time ago and have been working out in nature for years.

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >
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How one doctor’s medical fraud launched today’s deadly anti-vax movement

By Kurt Eichenwald
  • Journalists reviewed the embargoed press release they had received revealing the news: A Royal Free study may have discovered a link between autism in children and a gastrointestinal disorder.
  • By slamming the MMR in favor of individual vaccines made by no one, Wakefield could be interpreted as suggesting that parents cease inoculating their children entirely for three deadly diseases.
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‘Her eyes stay shut. She doesn’t respond. But nothing feels real until I tell her’: visiting my mother’s care home after a year

By Katherine Heiny
  • When I was about 20, I asked my mother what she would always remember about me and she said, “How much you love to talk.”
  • I tell her that when Angus interviewed at the supermarket, the manager asked him how fast he was on a scale of one to 10, and Angus thought about it for a long time and said maybe a 5.5.
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FOCUS YOU MUST: Our rituals cannot save us from anguish, they can only help us face down whatever comes next

By Debora Siegel-Acevedo
In the beginning was The Ritual, my pre-emptive strike against pandemic isolation and fear. That first morning of e-school in March 2020, two months before my husband Marco would lose his job, I called my tween twins to the living room to share a word of the day: Al-tru-ism (noun). Next, a poem that I’d seen circulating online, followed by a mindful minute from the Insight Timer app on my phone. We will ace this lockdown, I told myself. You The post FOCUS YOU MUST: Our rituals cannot

Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
[…]Read more >Similar articles >
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Science Saturday: Regenerative eyedrops tap blood for tears

By Susan Buckles
  • The Regenerative Medicine Therapeutic Suite s in Florida, recognizing an unmet patient need, began producing and offering a treatment known as autologous serum eyedrops to regenerate moisture.
  • The Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine has been a driver of advancing regenerative care, together with the Regenerative Medicine Therapeutic Suites, as a leader in outpatient regenerative procedures.
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For Americans’ Health, a Dollar of Carbon Emissions Prevented Is Worth a Ton of Cure

By Timothy G. Singer, Frances C. Moore
  • Rather, since 2016 when the federal government last released scientifically defensible estimates of the social cost of greenhouse gases, a deluge of new data has emerged on the health effects of climate change.
  • These are the figures that will be used in calculating the costs and benefits of the administration’s climate policies, including measures to protect Americans from the health effects of the changing environment.
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All about your coronavirus vaccine card (and what to do if you lose it)

By Allyson Chiu
  • If you need a second dose, referencing the card is a quick way for providers to make sure you’re getting the right shot at the right time without having to access your electronic records.
  • If you received two shots at different places, Knight recommends returning to the site where you got the second dose, which may be able to provide the information needed for a complete card.
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Fears frontline NHS staff are refusing to get Covid vaccine

By James Tapper
  • Nearly 15% of health service workers in England remain unvaccinated, and the numbers coming forward for a jab have decreased sharply in the last two weeks, NHS figures have revealed, prompting concerns that many frontline staff are refusing the vaccine.
  • But health leaders, patients’ groups and unions have been quick to dismiss any suggestion of mandatory vaccinations after it emerged that Matt Hancock, the health secretary, had embarked on a plan before the pandemic to make flu vaccinations compulsory for NHS staff.
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I helped my husband overcome his issues – but now I don’t want to have sex with him

By Annalisa Barbieri

While focusing on getting your husband back on track, it seems your needs got left behind, says Annalisa Barbieri

I feel stuck. I have been in a loving, happy relationship with my gorgeous, sexy husband for 12 years, and have two children. Our erotic life was initially enormously satisfying, but within a year of being together my husband suffered from erectile dysfunction for the first time. I tried to be reassuring, didn’t take it personally, and was committed to working through it, despite our shock.

Our sex life then waxed and waned for five years when my husband had cancer treatment. We read several books, continued with sensate focus exercises and committed one night a week to talking. We had couples counselling for a year to help us communicate better and manage our expectations in relation to intimacy.

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >
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UK church leaders warn against ‘dangerous’ vaccine passport plans

By Harriet Sherwood
  • Hundreds of UK church leaders have warned the prime minister that vaccine passports for entry into venues is “one of the most dangerous policy proposals ever to be made in the history of British politics”, with the “potential to bring about the end of liberal democracy as we know it”.
  • The letter says there is “no logical sense in terms of protecting others” in introducing Covid status certificates as a requirement for entry for venues, which could include churches.
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Coronavirus live news: concerns Indian Covid variant could ‘scupper’ UK roadmap; global death toll nears 3m

By Sarah Marsh
  • “From a retail point of view, people really did come out and support their local businesses and all the retailers I’ve spoken to said those first few days of the past week or so had been really positive in terms of trading.
  • The global death toll from coronavirus is expected to reach a milestone 3m as the race to vaccinate populations continues and countries such as India grapple with a surge in infections.
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Having both hearing and vision loss may double risk of dementia

By Liz Seegert
Photo: Mike Krzeszak via Flickr Losing some hearing or eyesight is fairly common as we age. However, a new study says losing function in both senses may increase risk of dementia and cognitive decline down the road. Journalists may want to consider looking at any local programs that address vision and hearing loss in older adults and how, or if, these programs address challenges of cognitive decline or multiple sensory impairments. In an analysis of people’s thinking and memory skills over a six-year period, researchers from South Korea found that dementia was more than twice as common in those with both hearing and vision loss than in […]Read more >Similar articles >

The J&J Vaccine Blood Clots Might Not Be a ‘Women’s Problem’

By Katherine J. Wu
The Johnson & Johnson shot is teetering on the precipice of becoming America’s “dudes only” vaccine. On Tuesday, the CDC and FDA advised halting the vaccine’s nationwide rollout to investigate six cases of a rare blood-clotting disorder that’s occurred in people within about two weeks of receiving the vaccine—all of them women under the age of 50. In an emergency meeting convened Wednesday by the CDC, experts raised the possibility of limiting its future use to males, reserving Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine, as some have unfortunately put it, for johnsons alone.That idea, crude though it may be, has something to it. The demographic […]Read more >Similar articles >
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White House turns its attention to COVID-19 variants

By ssoucher
  • But genetic sequencing will enable the country to quickly identify new variants of the virus, more accurately locate hot spots of variant activity, and aid in the development of booster vaccines, which will target circulating variants.
  • "Our ability to spot variants as they emerge and spread is vital, particularly as we aim to get ahead of dangerous variants before they emerge, as they are in the Midwest right now," Andy Slavitt, a senior White House pandemic adviser, said today during a COVID-19 briefing.
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New study links evangelical Christianity to phallic insecurity in the United States

By Eric W. Dolan
Phallic insecurity tends to be greater in regions of the United States that have a higher proportion of evangelical Christians, according to new research published in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion. The findings suggest that America’s evangelical subculture perpetuates insecurities about penis size. For their study, the researchers compared the popularity of Google searches for “male enhancement”, “make penis bigger”, and similar phrases to the adherence rate for evangelical Protestants in each state. They found that as the proportion of evangelicals in a state increased, the relative frequency of Google searches for these […]Read more >Similar articles >

What are the new Covid variants and what do they mean for the pandemic?

By Ian Sample Science editor

From Doug to Nelly and Eeek, we look at how mutations are affecting the battle against the virus

From the moment public health officials started to track new variants of coronavirus, it became clear that the same mutations were cropping up time and again and making the virus more troublesome. What are these mutations, what do they do, and what do they mean for the pandemic?

Related: Spreading faster, hitting harder – why young Brazilians are dying of Covid

Related: Is vaccinating against Covid enough? What we can learn from Chile and Israel

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >

Vaccines may help some ‘long COVID’ patients

By Will Stone, KJZZ
  • “I didn’t expect the vaccine to make people feel better,” said Akiko Iwasaki, an immunologist at the Yale School of Medicine who’s researching long COVID.
  • There are several leading theories for why vaccines could alleviate the symptoms of long COVID: It’s possible the vaccines clear up leftover virus or fragments, interrupt a damaging autoimmune response or in some other way “reset” the immune system.
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WHO: Global COVID cases approach earlier peak

By Lisa Schnirring
  • In India, currently one of the world's worst hot spots, cases reached a record high for the eighth day in a row, as the country's health officials looked for ways to increase vaccine production.
  • The World Health Organization's (WHO's) top official said today that cases and deaths have doubled over the past 2 months and are at worrying rates, even in countries that had avoided earlier surges.
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Psilocybin Performs At Least As Well as Leading Antidepressant in Small Study

By Neuroscience News
This shows wild psilocybin cyanescens mushroomsPsilocybin, the psychoactive compound found in magic mushrooms, is as effective at treating depression as conventional SSRI antidepressants. Researchers report, that although not significantly significant, early findings reveal those treated with psilocybin experienced more rapid and greater reductions in depression symptoms than those treated with SSRIs. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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COVID-19 Scan for Apr 16, 2021

By Jim Wappes
  • The study involved clinical and lab evaluation of 23 previously healthy patients who experienced blood clots and thrombocytopenia (low platelet counts) 6 to 24 days after receiving the first dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine.
  • Of the 2,346 otherwise healthy quarantined Marine recruits studied from May 11 to Nov 2, 2020, 189 were seropositive, or had antibodies against COVID-19 in their blood, indicating previous coronavirus infection, while 2,247 were seronegative.
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Video » The NIMH Director’s Innovation Speaker Series: Advancing Therapies for Central Nervous System Disorders

On April 15, 2021, Beverly Davidson, Ph.D., was the guest speaker for the NIMH Director’s Innovation Speaker Series. Dr. Davidson is the Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Arthur V. Meigs, Chair in Pediatrics at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), and director of the Raymond G. Perelman Center for Cellular and Molecular Therapeutics at CHOP. She provided an overview of recent research approaches for inherited disorders that impact central nervous system (CNS) function during her talk. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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College women drink more after exposure to sexism — even “benevolent” sexism

By Eric W. Dolan
College women tend to report consuming a greater number of alcoholic drinks after being subjected to sexist statements, according to new research published in the scientific journal Sex Roles. The findings shed light on the consequences of so-called “benevolent” sexism, which is often viewed as less harmful than overtly hostile sexism. “My co-author and I had previously explored whether college students’ alcohol consumption was higher following other types of belonging threat,” said study author Hannah R. Hamilton, a postdoctoral research fellow at UConn Health’s Alcohol Research Center. “With the gender gap in alcohol consumption […]Read more >Similar articles >

Doomscrolling: Why We Do It, and How We Can Stop

By Neuroscience News
  • The other big issue to consider tied to the negative impact of doomscrolling or other social media use is what valued, healthy activities are not happening because of the extensive time online.
  • A. I encourage people who are worried about whether they are doomscrolling to track both the time they are spending online reading scary and disturbing news stories and posts, and track the impact that time is having on their mood (e.g., levels of sadness, anxiety, and anger) and sleep.
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Autism Develops Differently in Girls Than Boys

By Neuroscience News
  • “This new study provides us with a roadmap for understanding how to better match current and future evidenced-based interventions to underlying brain and genetic profiles, so that we can get the right treatment to the right individual,” said lead investigator Kevin Pelphrey, PhD, a top autism expert at the University of Virginia School of Medicine and UVA’s Brain Institute.
  • New research has shed light on how autism-spectrum disorder (ASD) manifests in the brains of girls, prompting the scientists to warn that conclusions drawn from studies conducted primarily in boys should not be assumed to hold true for girls.
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Coronavirus News Roundup, April 10–April 16

By Robin Lloyd
  • “In Europe, at least 222 suspected cases of the clots and low platelet counts have been reported among 34 million people who have received their first dose” of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine, the Science story states.
  • Many experts now agree that schools can re-open safely if they implement coronavirus control measures including mask wearing, physical distancing of three feet with masks on and six feet with masks off (per recently updated guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control), and good ventilation, reports Tanya Lewi s at Scientific American (4/15/21).
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Institute policies to proactively support physicians who are breastfeeding

By Diane W. Shannon, MD, MPH
  • Physicians who are breastfeeding should have the support and resources they need, including protected time to pump, so that they can fully participate in their work, just as a physician with a broken leg might be given extra time to walk between sites or proactively provided with a leg scooter to make the experience doable.
  • Finally, providing protected time to pump supports the retention of women physicians.
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The Shock and Reality of Catching Covid After Being Vaccinated

By Steven Findlay
  • In data released Thursday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that at least 5,800 people had fallen ill or tested positive for the coronavirus two weeks or more after they completed both doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine.
  • What separates her from the vast majority of the tens of millions of other Americans who have come down with the virus is this: She got sick seven weeks after her second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine.
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People show reduced empathy toward sexualized women, study finds

By Beth Ellwood
  • New research suggests that people feel less empathy toward the experiences of sexually objectified women compared to non-sexualized women.
  • Prompted by these findings, the researchers next wanted to examine whether the objectification of a target may be influencing the extent that a subject accesses similar cognitive, perceptual, and affective processes when witnessing a target’s experience.
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Moderna struggling to supply promised doses of Covid vaccine

By Peter Beaumont and Peter Walker
  • The US pharmaceutical company Moderna, which produces the newest vaccine to be rolled out in the UK, is struggling to supply promised shots because of issues with increasing production at its European plant, in the latest problem to hit global vaccination plans.
  • While Moderna produces vaccines for the US market at its facility in Massachusetts, the company said issues with its European supply chain, which it is undertaking in partnership with the Swiss company Lonza Group AG, had caused the shortfall.
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KHN’s ‘What the Health?’: Pause and Effect on Covid Vaccines

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration jointly called for a pause in use of the vaccine made by Johnson & Johnson while experts try to figure out whether it is responsible for a small number of serious blood clots, mostly in women of childbearing age.
  • This week’s panelists are Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Tami Luhby of CNN, Rebecca Adams of CQ Roll Call and Shefali Luthra of The 19th.
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The Coronavirus Pandemic: The Latest on Variants and Rapid Testing

By Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
What are the implications that five COVID-19 variants that appear to spread faster than other variants are now circulating in the United States? How might continuing vaccination rollouts, as well as the anticipated availability of an increasing number of over-the-counter at-home tests, factor into controlling further spread? And what is the latest on COVID-19 vaccine development and access? In this Q&A, Harvard Chan epidemiologist Michael Mina and The World’s Elana Gordon take your questions. Presented jointly by The Forum at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and The World from PRX & GBH. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Coronavirus Does Not Infect the Brain but Still Inflicts Damage

By Neuroscience News
  • SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, likely does not directly infect the brain but can still inflict significant neurological damage, according to a new study from neuropathologists, neurologists, and neuroradiologists at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons.
  • The study, published in the journal Brain, is the largest and most detailed COVID-19 brain autopsy report published to date, suggests that the neurological changes often seen in these patients may result from inflammation triggered by the virus in other parts of the body or in the brain’s blood vessels.
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RAISE THE VOLUME ON YOUR SOUL’S VOICE: Live a life that is full, bright and abundant

By Christie Leigh Babirad
I believe learning to listen to your soul’s voice is one of the most essentially important skills to acquire mastery of. What I refer to as your “Soul Voice” is the voice inside of you that lights you up. It’s the voice that reminds you of your most cherished and sweetest memories, and all that you love and are passionate about. It’s also the voice that tells you honestly when you can do better, without criticizing you. It’s the voice The post RAISE THE VOLUME ON YOUR SOUL’S VOICE:

Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
[…]Read more >Similar articles >

Voices in Leadership, Ayanna Pressley: Why is Racial Demographic Data Critical to Combatting COVID?

By Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley, Representative (D-MA 7th district), describes why collecting racial demographic data is critical for combatting COVID-19 during a conversation with Michelle Williams, Dean of the Faculty, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and Jeffrey Sánchez, Former Massachusetts State Representative, and Lecturer, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Beyond COVID, the Future of mRNA Is Bright

By cody.cottier@wsu.edu (Cody Cottier)
  • Geall says the obvious candidates for mRNA vaccines include what he calls the “Big 6,” all of which remain crafty foes: malaria, cancer, tuberculosis HIV, cytomegalovirus, and respiratory syncytial virus.
  • Andrew Geall, co-founder of one company testing RNA vaccines and chief scientific officer of another, notes that mRNA has only just entered its infancy after a long gestation.
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OCD drug spotlighted as potential COVID-19 treatment

By Jim Wappes
  • Despite a highlight story on 60 Minutes last month, fluvoxamine, a drug typically used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), is still just a brief mention in the "cytokine inhibitors" section in the New York Times ' " Coronavirus Drug and Treatment Tracker ."
  • Even if the drug becomes a more mainstream treatment for COVID-19, one expert says any demand surge is not expected to result in shortages.
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Voices in Leadership, Ayanna Pressley: How Can We Create Equitable Access to COVID Vaccines?

By Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley, Representative (D-MA 7th district), expounds on the Equitable Data Collection Act, as well as creating equitable access to COVID-19 vaccines, during a conversation with Michelle Williams, Dean of the Faculty, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and Jeffrey Sánchez, Former Massachusetts State Representative, and Lecturer, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. […]Read more >Similar articles >

Chemical-laden indoor dust may interfere with sexual development, reproduction

By Karen Gail Feldscher
  • Indoor dust mimics sex hormones such as estrogen and testosterone in human cells, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
  • “We know from decades of research that these hormone-disrupting chemicals are prevalent in our bodies and that our exposures to them are associated with infertility, stunted development, thyroid disease, obesity, and diabetes,” said lead author Anna Young, a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Environmental Health .
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Voices in Leadership, Ayanna Pressley: Overcoming Concerns About COVID Vaccines

By Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley, Representative (D-MA 7th district), talks about overcoming her own fear of COVID-19 vaccines and how she encourages constituents to get vaccinated during a conversation with Michelle Williams, Dean of the Faculty, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and Jeffrey Sánchez, Former Massachusetts State Representative, and Lecturer, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Pregnant women in UK given green light to have Covid jab

By Alexandra Topping and Nicola Davis
  • All pregnant women will be offered the Pfizer or Moderna jab based on their age and clinical risk group after real-world data from the US showed about 90,000 pregnant women had been vaccinated without any safety concerns, the UK’s Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) said on Friday.
  • Dr Edward Morris, the president of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, said vaccination offered pregnant women the best protection from Covid.
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Colon Cancer in Young People | Q&A

By Johns Hopkins Medicine
Dr. Alodia Gabre-Kidan discusses the recent rise in young patients with colorectal cancer, the multidisciplinary team at the Johns Hopkins Colorectal Cancer Research Center of Excellence and its coordinated approach to patient care. #ColonCancer #JohnsHopkins Learn more at www.hopkinsmedicine.org/colorectalsurgery.0:10 How is Johns Hopkins treating young patients with colon cancer?0:42 What type of care do young patients with colorectal cancer need?1:56 Describe the colorectal cancer multidisciplinary team at Johns Hopkins?2:39 Why should patients come to Johns Hopkins for colorectal cancer care? […]Read more >Similar articles >

Has the pandemic really caused a mental health crisis? | Letters

By Letters

Understandable human responses to difficult circumstances should not be framed as a ‘mental illness’ pandemic, writes Dr Lucy Johnstone, but Dr Annie Hickox says there has been a significant increase in cases over the past year

Many mental health professionals will have read your carte blanche for a further massive expansion of psychiatry into our lives with dismay (Editorial, 12 April).

The “mental health pandemic” trope simply does not fit the evidence. Yes, some people have suffered greatly, but the overall picture is of a population that is largely resilient, although understandably bored, lonely and frustrated at times.

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >

U.S. setting up $1.7 billion national network to track virus variants

By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Associated Press
  • White House officials said the government is releasing to states and territories an initial $240 million out of $1 billion allocated to expand genomic sequencing.
  • “In order for us to even have the possibility of getting back to normal by the fall we need to massively scale up our genomic surveillance,” said Esther Krofah, who directs the Faster Cures initiative of the Milken Institute.
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The Fast Lane for COVID Testing Has Opened Up in the U.S.

By Carolyn Barber
  • On March 31 the Food and Drug Administration effectively made a game-changing announcement: two rapid at-home antigen tests, Abbott’s BinaxNOW and Quidel’s QuickVue, will soon be sold over the counter (OTC) on drugstore shelves, without the need for a prescription.
  • Prior to the FDA’s statement March 31, of the 16 rapid antigen tests that had been approved, only one was greenlit for home over-the-counter use (without a prescription) by Ellume, and it is not yet available to the public for purchase.
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Mayo study differentiates what blood-based proteins indicate about brain cell loss

By Susan Barber Lindquist
  • Neurofilament light was more strongly related to worse cognition and neurodegeneration, compared to total tau, according to a preliminary Mayo Clinic study that will be presented in the Emerging Science program at the 2021 virtual American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting .
  • In the study, 995 participants enrolled in the community-based Mayo Clinic Study of Aging had data collected for plasma neurofilament light, total tau, cognitive status and neuroimaging.
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Are antidepressants also pain relievers?

By Robert H. Shmerling, MD
  • For people with chronic low back or neck pain or osteoarthritis of the hip or knee, an antidepressant medication is not usually the first treatment recommended.
  • People treated with certain antidepressants for chronic pain often stopped taking the medication because it didn’t work, caused unacceptable side effects, or both.
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Zoom Is Good, Actually

By Olga Khazan
  • But I find working in an office, public speaking, going to big parties, and attending important meetings in person enormously stressful.
  • Zoom is such a shoddy substitute for real life that, according to o ne survey, nearly one in five workers has illicitly met up in person with colleagues to discuss work.
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India Covid variant found in UK specimens taken in February

By Nicola Davis Science correspondent
  • The Guardian understands that the PHE report only includes a particular variant once experts believe there is sufficient evidence to suggest it is potentially worrying – not when the variant is first noticed.
  • Analysis of the Covid-19 genomics UK consortium database reveals that the first specimens found to contain the India variant date back to 22 February.
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Will You Need a Booster Shot of the COVID-19 Vaccine?

By Alice Park
  • And on April 15, CNBC aired a video segment, taped prevously, in which Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla said that it might be “likely” that people would need a third dose of their COVID-19 vaccine within a year after getting the first two doses, referencing human clinical trials the company began in February to test a third dose.
  • In data released in April, both Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna reported that their current two-dose vaccines contribute to strong antibodies that can neutralize the COVID-19 virus for up to six months.
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Health and Social Policy Moving Forward: The Partisan Divide

By Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
A Democratic presidential administration. A Democrat-controlled Congress. A conservative Supreme Court. What are the likely implications for health and rights as these three powerful entities intersect under the Biden administration? A cadre of experts examined a range of issues from the Affordable Care Act, to voting rights, to gun safety.This Forum event drew on a March report in JAMA on how U.S. health policy may evolve, given the sharp partisan divide in the U.S. Congress. Though Democrats have control over the three bodies of national government, their vote margins are slim in the Senate and House, and this will impact some of the […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Mayo Clinic Q and A: Foot rash and COVID-19

  • While we generally think about fever, cough and fatigue as the most common symptoms of COVID-19 infection, sometimes skin reactions may prompt your health care provider to recommend testing for COVID-19, as well.
  • From the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, health care providers around the world began observing and sharing that some patients who are found to be infected with COVID-19 have new skin issues related to the illness.
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Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast: The importance of physical activity for kids of all abilities

When it comes to children, physical activity is important for development. Physical activity helps build strong bones and muscles and reduces the risk of developing heart disease, cancer, obesity and Type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), regular physical activity also reduces stress and anxiety, and kids who are […]Read more >Similar articles >
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Study of mouse gut microbiome may provide clues to how cancer develops in humans

  • ― A study of the mouse gut microbiome led by researchers from Mayo Clinic may shed light on how cancerous tumors develop and progress in humans.
  • "There is growing recognition that healthy tissues accumulate cancer-related mutations over time but they don’t necessarily cause illness," says stem cell and cancer biologist Nagarajan Kannan, Ph.D., who led the study.
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The Year That Broke America’s Health-Care Workers

By Bryce Covert
  • “You physically do not have the caregivers and the nurses and social workers in the building to be able to sit and talk with people in a way that makes them feel like they’re not alone,” she said.
  • Chronic understaffing became an acute crisis last year, as people got sick or feared for their safety if they came to work; one in five nursing homes was short on staff last summer.
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Mayo Clinic responds to the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine pause

  • On Tuesday, April 13, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a joint recommendation to pause distribution of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine after reported cases of rare blood clotting events in recipients.
  • Out of an abundance of caution, the FDA and CDC recommends a pause on the Johnson & Johnson vaccine based on six rare blood clotting events in recipients.
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Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast: Mayo’s bold changes, moving forward through the COVID-19 pandemic

  • In the midst of the COVID-19 global health crisis, Mayo Clinic is changing the way patient care is provided.
  • "The pandemic served to reinforce our 2030 'Bold.Forward.' strategy, which is to cure more patients, to connect people and data, to create new scalable knowledge, and to transform health care through our unique Mayo Clinic platform." Dr. Gianrico Farrugia
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Are they safe? Are they effective? Will you need a booster? Your COVID-19 vaccine questions answered

  • In this Q&A, Dr. Abinash Virk, an infectious diseases expert and co-chair of the Mayo Clinic COVID-19 Vaccine Allocation and Distribution workgroup, answers questions about vaccine efficacy and safety, and why you should get vaccinated even if you've recovered from COVID-19 infection.
  • For the people who think that they've had COVID-19 and they don't need the vaccine, you still want to get the vaccine because it's going to give you long-term protection.
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Tell us: how has it felt to re-emerge from England’s lockdown?

By Guardian community team

We’d like to hear how people have fared emotionally since restrictions in England were partially eased

As pubs, restaurants, hairdressers, gyms, outdoor leisure venues and non-essential shops in England opened their doors again this week, we’d love to hear how people feel about resuming social activities after months of lockdown.

If you went out since restrictions were relaxed, you could tell us about the first time you were among lots of people again, used public transport, met others to socialise or treated yourself.

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Women in England almost twice as likely as men to be prescribed opiate painkillers

By Sarah Marsh and Pamela Duncan
  • Guidance issued by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) this month said people with chronic pain which had no known cause should not be prescribed painkillers, and should instead be offered therapies including exercise programmes, acupuncture and antidepressants.
  • Women in England are almost twice as likely as men to be prescribed powerful and potentially addictive opiate painkillers, prompting experts to warn that female pain is overly medicated and not properly investigated.
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Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast: Don’t miss a beat with preventive heart care

By Dana Sparks
  • For many people, the COVID-19 pandemic has provided an opportunity to reassess priorities in their lives, spend more time with loved ones, and take care of some projects or personal issues that they’ve been avoiding.
  • Dr. Christopher DeSimone, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist, says he's concerned some patients may have been ignoring symptoms, waiting six or nine months, or even a year, before going to in for a medical exam.
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Tory government infected with widespread cronyism, says Labour

By Kevin Rawlinson
  • The Conservative government is “infected with widespread cronyism”, Labour has claimed, amid reports the health secretary’s family firm won contracts from the NHS.
  • “There are serious questions to answer from Matt Hancock and there needs to be a full inquiry and immediate publication of all documents relating to Topwood’s acceptance on to the framework contract in 2019,” Madders said.
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Mysterious Ailment, Mysterious Relief: Vaccines Help Some Covid Long Haulers

By Will Stone
  • “I didn’t expect the vaccine to make people feel better,” said Akiko Iwasaki, an immunologist at the Yale School of Medicine who’s researching long covid.
  • There are several leading theories for why vaccines could alleviate the symptoms of long covid: It’s possible the vaccines clear up leftover virus or fragments, interrupt a damaging autoimmune response or in some other way “reset” the immune system.
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Pandemic Highlights Need for Urgent Care Clinics for Women

By Rachel Scheier
  • For years, many women with common but urgent conditions like painful urinary tract infections or excessive bleeding in the aftermath of a miscarriage have faced a grim choice between waiting weeks for an appointment with their regular OB-GYN or braving hours in an ER waiting room.
  • By the time she stumbled into the newly opened Bascom OB-GYN urgent care clinic at the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, clutching a pillow to her belly, Garcia was pale and dehydrated from blood loss and certain she was dying.
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I’ve been agoraphobic – what I learned may help those with post-lockdown anxiety | Rhiannon Lucy Coslett

By Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett
  • Dr Tine Van Bortel, a senior research associate in public health at the University of Cambridge, said: “Lockdown has given people with mental health conditions like anxiety and PTSD permission to stay at home, and knowing that at some point you’ll have to go out again can actually trigger stress and anxiety.”
  • That’s not to say that millions of people will have developed actual agoraphobia as it is defined in the DSM-5 (the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) – it is not simply a fear of open spaces but a fear of being in places that it might be difficult or embarrassing to get out of, or a fear of having a panic attack.
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Recent killings in Georgia raise awareness of ongoing anti-Asian hate and spur calls for action

By USC News
  • Nationwide, nearly 3,800 hate incidents against Asian American and Pacific Islander communities have been documented through Stop AAPI Hate, a national hate crime reporting effort, since the pandemic was declared in March 2020.
  • The deaths are just the latest and most violent examples of what many have experienced all year -- the feeling that COVID-19 has exacerbated their feelings of being unwelcomed, different and outsiders, added Wang, director of Asian Pacific American Student Services, or APASS, at USC.
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That glorious mix of chilly air and clear, bright skies? There’s a word for that | Hannah Jane Parkinson

By Hannah Jane Parkinson

Apricity is a word to savour: contrast is what makes life sing

Yesterday I went for a walk with a friend, AKA the only government-mandated social activity at that moment (truly, what a time to be alive!). It was cold, but the sun had lingered, and there existed that glorious mix of chilly air and clear, bright skies. Just as the air shifted from cool to sharp, and began to nip at my cheeks, turning them pink and slightly uncomfortable, we would emerge from a copse of trees into the warmth of sunshine unimpeded by cloud.

Thanks to Susie Dent, lexicographer and etymologist (wonderful words in themselves), as well as our greatest political commentator by means of her deliciously shady words of the day on Twitter (“throttlebottom: a bumbling, inept individual in public office”), I now know a word for this sensation: apricity. As Dent says, it is a word to savour.

Continue reading […]Read more >Similar articles >

Vision: What’s so special about words?

By mdbownds@wisc.edu (Deric Bownds)
  • suggests that this sensitivity may be driven by the same domain-general mechanisms that enable the visual system to detect statistical regularities in the visual environment.
  • This suggests that part of what is usually considered reading-specific processing could be performed by domain-general visual mechanisms.
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Podcast: How Much Should You Really Worry About the Vaccine-Blood-Clot News?

  • Part of the point of the meetings is to really see how strong that link is, so I can’t conclusively say it, but I think there’s kind of a bump in confidence right now because what they’re detecting with these specific clots looks a lot like what has been going on with the AstraZeneca vaccine, which in terms of vaccine recipe, looks pretty similar to the J&J vaccine.
  • Despite weeks of growing vaccinations and good news, headlines about blood clots and a “pause” in deploying the much-anticipated Johnson & Johnson shots have people worried.
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Examining the successes and failures of single-payer health care in Canada

By William Brangham
More than 30 million Americans have gone without health insurance in the last year. Several other high-income nations cover their entire populations for a lot less money than the U.S. spends. But does a universal health care system help in a pandemic? For answers, William Brangham, along with producers Jason Kane and Claire Mufson, look to our northern neighbor Canada and its single-payer system. […]Read more >Similar articles >
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MGH’s Complex Care Service untangles autoimmune mystery

  • “The arc of her infections seemed to increase after the stem cell transplant,” said Ryan Thompson, an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and a member of Massachusetts General Hospital’s inpatient Complex Care Service.
  • “There have been some times when she has been hopeless,” said Priscilla Parris, a nurse practitioner on the Complex Care Service who works with Hedspeth.
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Workers in insecure jobs twice as likely to die of Covid, TUC research finds

By Richard Partington Economics correspondent
  • According to analysis of official figures by the trade union umbrella group, Covid-19 mortality rates among male workers in insecure jobs was 51 per 100,000 people aged 20-64, compared with 24 out of 100,000 in more secure work.
  • It said many of these key workers were in insecure work, such as zero-hours contracts and agency employment, landing them with a “triple whammy” of no sick pay, fewer rights and endemic low pay, while having to shoulder more risk of infection.
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