Nov 30, 2022

Select Page

News from all over | Updated hourly

Post image

Drug slows cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s patients, study reveals

Health | The Guardian By Ian Sample Science editor
  • Researchers have hailed the dawn of a new era of Alzheimer’s therapies after a clinical trial confirmed that a drug slows cognitive decline in patients with early stages of the disease.
  • An era that comes after more than 20 years of hard work on anti-amyloid immunotherapies, by many, many people, and many disappointments along the way,” said Nick Fox, professor of clinical neurology and director of the Dementia Research Centre at UCL.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

NHS England ad campaign hopes to change behaviours and relieve service

NHS | The Guardian By Aubrey Allegretti
  • An advertising campaign devised by M&C Saatchi, awarded a contract by NHS England worth up to £28.6m, suggested ways people could be encouraged to settle for a virtual appointment or visit a pharmacist instead.
  • Plans have been drawn up to avoid the NHS being overwhelmed this winter by encouraging patients to “behave in ways they’ve not experienced before” and cut down on in-person GP visits, the Guardian can reveal.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

It’s just a first step, but this new Alzheimer’s drug could be a huge breakthrough | Jonathan Schott

Health | The Guardian By Jonathan Schott
  • When given to patients with early Alzheimer’s disease, lecanemab not only removed beta-amyloid from patients’ brains, but slowed cognitive decline by about 27% over 18 months.
  • Better diagnostic tests are available, and we may now be on the cusp of new treatments that could have an impact on some of the fundamental brain changes thought to lead to dementia.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Ambulance staff could coordinate strikes with other NHS workers

NHS | The Guardian By Aletha Adu Political correspondent
  • Ambulance workers could coordinate strike action with other NHS workers to send a clear message to the government to invest in the health service, the UK’s biggest trade union, Unison, has said.
  • Asked if ambulance workers would coordinate industrial action with nurses, Sara Gorton, the head of health at Unison, said: “We have a good relationship with all NHS trade unions.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Preparing professionals to collaborate with, manage and lead diverse teams

USC News By USC News
  • This Fall, Chae is among the first master's students in the Managing Complexity in Diverse Organizations (MCDO) program, a new online professional skills-building program at USC Annenberg that prepares future communications professionals to create and support inclusive environments, and to help advance equity and representation across the communication and media landscape.
  • "We developed the MCDO program to address a critical competency for 21st-century professionals: the ability to create, sustain and thrive within diverse work environments.," said USC Annenberg Dean Willow Bay.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

At least 45 Australian soldiers killed themselves after PoW training, inquiry told

Mental health | The Guardian By Australian Associated Press
  • Colonel Simon Dowse, from the Defence School of Intelligence, told the Royal Commission into Defence and Veteran Suicide that the force’s conduct after capture (CAC) courses were designed to help members cope if kidnapped or taken hostage.
  • At least 45 Australian defence force personnel killed themselves after attending training to deal with potentially being captured, interrogated and tortured, an inquiry has been told.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Ambulance workers across England to strike before Christmas

NHS | The Guardian By Nadeem Badshah
  • Unison, the UK’s biggest trade union, announced the results of its month-long NHS strike ballot and said thousands of 999 call handlers, ambulance technicians, paramedics and their colleagues working for ambulance services in the north-east, north-west, London, Yorkshire and the south-west are to take industrial action.
  • “The public knows health services won’t improve without huge increases in staffing and wants the government to pay up to save the NHS.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Parents refuse use of vaccinated blood in life-saving surgery on baby

Health | The Guardian By Eva Corlett in Wellington
  • New Zealand’s health service has made a court application over the guardianship of a four-month-old baby whose parents are refusing to allow his life-saving heart surgery to go ahead unless non-vaccinated blood is used.
  • In a statement, Dr Mike Shepard, Auckland’s interim director at the health service, Te Whatu Ora, said he knows it can be worrying for parents who have an unwell child and are making decisions about their care.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Six in 10 older teens in England have ‘possible eating problems’

Health | The Guardian By Denis Campbell Health policy editor
  • Six in ten (60%) 17- to 19-year-olds in England have “possible problems with eating”, according to research undertaken by NHS Digital, the health service’s statistical body.
  • “It’s deeply concerning that so many children and young people are reporting possible eating problems,” said Tom Quinn, director of external affairs at Beat, the eating disorders charity.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Toward Early Detection of the Pathological Social Withdrawal Syndrome Known as ‘Hikikomori’

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • In 2018, the team developed the ‘Hikikomori Questionnaire,’ or HQ-25, that was design to assess whether individuals under social withdrawal after six months are symptomatic of hikikomori.
  • Preliminary results show that isolation is a possible factor that can distinguish between non-hikikomori and pre-hikikomori individuals, providing possible validation of the new questionnaire as a tool for early detection and treatment.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Key Factors Identified for Regeneration of Brain Tissue

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • LMU researchers demonstrate in a zebrafish model that two proteins prevent scar formation in the brain, thereby improving the ability of tissue to regenerate.
  • Summary: Researchers have identified two proteins that prevent the formation of scars in the brain and help promote the regeneration of new neural tissue.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

The Real Benefits of Walking in a Winter Wonderland

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • Lead author Dr. Kamila Czepczor-Bernat, of the Medical University of Silesia, said, “A body of evidence now exists showing that nature exposure—living close to, frequenting, or engaging with environments such as forests and parks—is associated with a range of physical and psychological well-being benefits.
  • Summary: Spending time enjoying white spaces by taking a walk in the snow this Winter can have a positive effect on your bodily appreciation, a new study reports.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Up to 100,000 nurses to strike in December with threat to escalate action

Health | The Guardian By Denis Campbell Health policy editor
  • But the union made clear that it would increase the scale of its industrial action unless Steve Barclay, the health secretary, engages in detailed talks over their demand for a pay rise of inflation plus 5%.
  • The stoppages on 15 and 20 December will severely disrupt care and services at 53 NHS organisations in England – about half those where the RCN’s recent ballot produced a majority of nurses in favour of withdrawing their labour.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

The Brain’s Immune Cells Can Be Triggered to Slow Down Alzheimer’s Disease

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • Researchers from Lund University and Karolinska Institutet have now shown that a certain type of activation of the microglial cells triggers inflammatory protective mechanisms in the immune system.
  • When TREM2 is activated in people with Alzheimer’s, the researchers have found that less of the thread-like structures formed by the protein tau accumulate in the brain cells.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Brain Cells Use a ‘Telephone Trick’ to Report What They See

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • A new study from Duke University finds that single neurons conveying visual information about two separate objects in sight do so by alternating signals about one or the other.
  • Summary: Single neurons conveying visual information about two separate objects in line of sight do so by alternating signals about one object or the other.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

COVID-19 death rates in young people rose in 2021

CIDRAP - COVID-19 News By Jim Wappes
Today in Annals of Internal Medicine, researchers show that, compared to 2020, mortality rates due to COVID-19 infections among young adults increased significantly in 2021, suggesting younger people had lower vaccine uptake and adhered to fewer COVID precautions than older adults in the United StatesTo understand the age shift that occurred among COVID-19 deaths in the United States, researchers used Years of Life Lost (YLL) rather than mortality during March to December of 2020 and March to December of 2021. The study was based on data from the CDC WONDER (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Wide-ranging ONline Data for […]Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

New data: Screening for COVID at hospital entry of limited benefit

CIDRAP - COVID-19 News By Jim Wappes
  • Screening nearly 1 million patients, visitors, and healthcare workers at the entrance of a large hospital for COVID-19 symptoms, exposures, or travel was of limited benefit at considerable cost, finds a Yale study published yesterday in JAMA Internal Medicine .
  • Researchers tracked rates of failed COVID-19 screenings (ie, temperature of 100.4°F or higher, exposure or symptom suggestive of COVID-19, positive test result in the preceding 2 weeks, or recent travel to high-risk areas) at 10 entrances to Yale New Haven Hospital from Mar 17, 2020, to May 8, 2021.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

NHS England waiting times for gender dysphoria patients unlawful, court hears

NHS | The Guardian By Haroon Siddique Legal affairs correspondent
  • Lock, who described waiting times as “extreme”, told the court NHSE had also breached the public sector equality duty and the four individual claimants were unlawfully discriminated against as they are waiting far longer than other patients for treatment.
  • Transgender claimants, who have suffered ​distress as a result of delays, ​want the court to declare that NHSE broke the law by failing to meet a target for 92% of patients to commence treatment within 18 weeks​.​
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Neurotic Personality Trait a Key Risk Factor for Stress Perception

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • In a meta-analysis synthesizing more than 1,500 effect sizes from about 300 primary studies, the team showed that while all of the “Big Five” personality traits—agreeableness, conscientiousness, extraversion, neuroticism and openness—are related to experiencing stress, neuroticism showed the strongest link, said Bo Zhang, a professor of labor and employment relations and of psychology at Illinois and a co-author of the paper.
  • A new paper co-written by a team of University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign experts who study the science of personalities points to the important role of personality traits to account for individual differences in experiencing stress.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Study on masks vs N95 respirators for health workers spurs concerns

CIDRAP - COVID-19 News By Jim Wappes
  • A study today in the Annals of Internal Medicine suggests that medical masks may offer similar effectiveness as N95 respirators in protecting healthcare workers (HCWs) exposed to COVID-19 patients in certain settings, but experts caution against that interpretation of the results.
  • "It shows a general trend to N95s being superior to surgical masks at all sites except Egypt, noting that both study arms used an N95 respirator for aerosol-generating procedures, and the intervention was tested only for periods of care outside of such procedures," said MacIntyre, who has conducted most of the published studies comparing the effectiveness of masks and N95s against respiratory viruses in healthcare settings.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

FROM THE LABS: Carbon ultrafine particles accelerate lung cancer progression

Baylor College of Medicine Blog Network By Ana Rodríguez
  • In a study published in the current edition of Science Advances, Dr. Cheng-Yen Chang, a postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Farrah Kheradmand’s lab in the Department of Medicine – Pulmonary at Baylor, and their team discovered that exposure to ultrafine particles alters the function of immune cells in the lungs, disabling their natural defense mechanism against tumors.
  • Using two different mouse models of lung cancer, Chang was able to replicate the same type of exposure to ultrafine particles typically seen in a heavy smoker.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

‘Exposed to horrendous things’: young people in UK speak out against evangelical church

Mental health | The Guardian By Maeve McClenaghan
  • Walking down the street in south London when she was 13 years old, Reign had been approached by a church member who told her about the Victory youth group (VYG), part of the church that offered activities for young people.
  • Then, there is a worldwide, twice-yearly Campaign of Israel, where the church encourages congregants to give large, personal sacrifices in return for blessings from God. During the summer campaign, former members said videos were played in VYG sessions of people speaking about selling their possessions, giving all their savings, or even money meant for visa renewals to the church.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Air pollution linked to almost a million stillbirths a year

Health & wellbeing | The Guardian By Damian Carrington Environment editor
First global analysis follows discovery of toxic pollution particles in lungs and brains of foetusesAlmost a million stillbirths a year can be attributed to air pollution, according to the first global study.The research estimated that almost half of stillbirths could be linked to exposure to pollution particles smaller than 2.5 microns (PM2.5), mostly produced from the burning of fossil fuels. Continue reading… […]Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Death and the salesman: the 22-year-old selling human bones for a living

Medical research | The Guardian By Francesca Carington
  • B ut the murkiness of the bones’ origins – both in terms of the historical roots of the trade and its continued exploitation of marginalised people’s remains throughout the 20th century – is troublesome for many, including Sam Redman, a history professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and author of Bone Rooms, which details how the skulls of Indigenous and non-white people were collected and used to support theories of racial categorization.
  • Faced with a scarcer supply of bodies, British doctors turned to the colonies – specifically India, where Calcutta became the capital of the human bone trade.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

At 35, I found out I had gout. Imagine having to give up everything you like to eat and drink | Daniel Lavelle

Health | The Guardian By Daniel Lavelle
  • She tells me my foot could be sore and disfigured for life, or I could end up like Bob Marley, who, she says, famously dismissed a sore toe and died of cancer soon after.
  • I think I should go to a hospital, but I reason that the NHS is too busy and what can they do about a broken toe except say “you have a broken toe” and send me on my way with crutches and painkillers.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

There’s no such thing as a good cold

Vox - Science & Health By Keren Landman
  • The authors hypothesized that after several pandemic years during which masks, distancing, and ventilation protected so many people from initial infections with a range of viruses, more people than usual would be catching certain diseases for the first — and worst — time now that those protections are not as strongly in place.
  • That means that in many parts of the world, there are nearly three years’ worth of new children with relatively naive, and therefore vulnerable, immune systems, explained Ron Dagan, a doctor and researcher who specializes in pediatric respiratory infections at Israel’s Ben-Gurion University of the Negev.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Physically active lifestyle is associated with lower long-term incidence of bipolar disorder, study finds

PsyPost By Vladimir Hedrih
  • “Those having a physically active lifestyle (being a skier in our study) had around 50% lower risk of developing bipolar disorder compared to the general population during the up to 21 years long follow-up in our study,” Svensson told PsyPost.
  • An longitudinal study of people who participated in Vasloppet, the world’s largest long-distance ski-race, held in Sweden showed that those participating in the race have lower incidence of bipolar disorder compared to the general population.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Be aware of safety concerns while holiday drinking

Baylor College of Medicine Blog Network By Andrew Phifer
  • Q: What precautions to prevent injury should you take if you, your family or friends will be drinking during holiday activities like cooking and outdoor games?
  • It’s important to remember that alcohol impacts your body the same way, no matter what time of day or night you are drinking.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Listening to podcasts may help satisfy our psychological need for social connection, study finds

PsyPost By Beth Ellwood
  • The study found that people who listened to more podcasts per month reported a greater presence of meaning in life and those who formed parasocial relationships with hosts reported a greater sense of relatedness.
  • The researchers also wanted to study the outcomes of podcast listening, suggesting that the practice might help fulfill basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Belfast doctor Michael Watt misdiagnosed 45% of cases, review into deaths finds

Health | The Guardian By Jamie Grierson
  • In the wake of the 2018 recall, the Belfast health and social care trust set up special clinics so that the patients concerned – some as young as 14 – could have their condition re-assessed as soon as possible.
  • A review of the clinical records of 44 patients who died under the care of the disgraced former neurologist Michael Watt has found a misdiagnosis rate of 45%.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

China’s zero-Covid policy explained in 30 seconds

Medical research | The Guardian By Helen Davidson
  • Under this zero-Covid policy, local officials have been tasked with the near impossible: to resolutely control all outbreaks to maximum effect with minimal social and economic disruption.
  • Since the Covid pandemic began, China’s government has operated a zero-tolerance policy on outbreaks .
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

China targets older people in Covid-19 vaccination drive

Health | The Guardian By Helen Davidson in Taipei and agencies
  • Chinese health officials have announced a drive to accelerate vaccinations of older people against Covid-19, as police patrolled major cities to stamp out protests against the country ’s strict zero-Covid policy.
  • There were reports of police asking people for their phones to check if they had virtual private networks (VPNs) and the Telegram app, which has been used by weekend protesters.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Enzyme Drives Cognitive Decline in Mice, Provides New Target for Alzheimer’s

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • In a new study, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found that the subtle increase in PKCα was sufficient to produce biochemical, cellular and cognitive impairments in mice, similar to those observed in human AD.
  • In a recent search for gene variants associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), several affected families showed a mutation in an enzyme called protein kinase C-alpha (PKCα).
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

HP’s Instant Ink service left me with invisible benefits

Health & wellbeing | The Guardian By Zoe Wood
My subscription has ended and so the four printer cartridges I’ve been sent have stopped workingA few years ago I took out an Instant Ink subscription service for my HP home printer. You pay a monthly amount based on your expected use and when the ink is running low the printer sends a message to HP, which sends a new cartridge in the post.However, I have been hardly using my printer so I tried to reduce the amount of ink ‘ordered’ each month. The website makes this difficult to do and I ended up getting conflicting messages that said I had both cancelled and changed my subscription. Continue reading… […]Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Stress, exhaustion and 1,000 patients a day: the life of an English GP

NHS | The Guardian By Tim Adams
  • Before we get to his patients, he sits me down in his consulting room and gives me a brisk diagnosis of some of the problems facing doctors across the county and the country as we head into another long NHS winter.
  • The Aspen practice has just over 30,000 patients on its books; on any given Monday, like today, 1,000 of them will be in clinical contact with the surgery; at 9am the queues are forming, the phones are backed up and emails with URGENT subject headings are flooding in.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

‘This is as much about patient safety as pay’: NHS faces wave of strikes as more unions vote

NHS | The Guardian By Jon Ungoed-Thomas and Michael Savage
  • The NHS faces the threat of coordinated industrial action lasting several months, with results to be announced within days of strike ballots of ambulance crews and about 300,000 health workers.
  • The same union’s ballot in Northern Ireland closed on 18 November with a vote for industrial action while in Scotland it has recommended members accept proposed pay increases worth up to 11% for the lowest-paid workers.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Milk formula firms target women looking for pregnancy advice

Health & wellbeing | The Guardian By Rosie Taylor
Companies advertise products to women searching online for folic acid to get around marketing restrictionsWomen trying for a baby are being targeted by formula milk companies on social media even before they have become pregnant, a World Health Organization scientist has said.Formula milk brands use online shopping and search data to detect when someone is planning a baby, said Dr Nigel Rollins, of the department of maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health at the WHO. Continue reading… […]Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

GPs tell patients to ‘get an Uber’ as NHS ambulance delays hit record level

NHS | The Guardian By Jon Ungoed-Thomas
  • Jha said it was often a dilemma as to whether to keep a patient at the practice and wait for an ambulance with oxygen on hand, or take the risk of them going unaccompanied to hospital to ensure they get faster access to the medical attention they need.
  • The proportion of delays exceeding one hour in handovers from an ambulance to a hospital in England increased from 3% in October 2020 to 18% in October 2022, according to the latest figures published by the Association of Ambulance Chief Executives.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Child asylum seekers detained as adults after UK Home Office ‘alters birth dates’

Health | The Guardian By Mark Townsend Home Affairs Editor
  • The Refugee Council said interviews with 16 children released from Manston revealed that even in the cases of some boys who had identity documents stating they were children, the Home Office changed their dates of birth to make them over 18.
  • The Home Office is routinely changing the dates of birth of unaccompanied child asylum seekers to classify them as adults, according to experts who say the practice is now happening on a “horrifying scale”.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

What is the Tory party’s legacy after so many years in power? Pretty thin gruel | Isabel Hardman

NHS | The Guardian By Isabel Hardman
  • Party leaders tend to point to everything they’ve achieved, before asking voters for more time to finish the job.
  • The current occupant of Number 10, Rishi Sunak, is trying to persuade his MPs to stick with him at least until that election, with many of the brightest and best considering quitting before they get shoved by their voters.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Public sector pay rises cannot match inflation, says transport secretary

NHS | The Guardian By Pippa Crerar Political editor
  • Inflation-busting pay rises for struggling public sector workers are “unaffordable”, the transport secretary has said, raising the likelihood of winter strikes going ahead across the rail network, schools and the NHS .
  • Mark Harper said there was not a “bottomless pit” of money to meet the demands of workers planning to take industrial action in the coming weeks, even though benefits and pensions are going up in line with inflation.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Overweight people are seen as less capable of thinking and acting autonomously, study finds

PsyPost By Vladimir Hedrih
  • The final two studies showed that participants assessed that heavier-weight people would be less capable in work roles requiring mental agency than average-weight people, while this was not the case for roles requiring experience.
  • “I was interested in understanding how people conflate bodily capacities with mental capacities, and how this intersects with harmful anti-fat beliefs,” said study author Mattea Sim, a visiting research scientist at Indiana University.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Inflation-busting public sector pay rises ‘unaffordable’, says UK minister – video

NHS | The Guardian
Inflation-busting pay rises for struggling public sector workers are ‘unaffordable’, the transport secretary has said, raising the likelihood of winter strikes going ahead across the rail network, schools and theNHS. Speaking on the Sophy Ridge on Sunday programme on Sky News, Mark Harper said: ‘Inflation-matching or inflation-busting pay rises are unaffordable. We want to try and give all the workers in the public sector who work very hard decent pay rises, but they can’t be inflation-busting pay rises’Public sector pay demands ‘unaffordable’, says transport secretary Continue reading… […]Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Impulsivity early in adolescence linked to antisocial personality disorder and alcohol use disorder in later life

PsyPost By Emily Manis
  • A study published in the Journal of Adolescent Health explores the relationships between impulsivity, antisocial behavior, and alcohol use through different stages of adolescence and emerging adulthood.
  • Interestingly, antisocial behavior in mid adolescence predicted higher alcohol use into late adolescence and emerging adulthood, while impulsivity did not.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Child in mental health crisis lived at police station for two days, chief reveals

Health | The Guardian By Vikram Dodd Police and crime correspondent
  • Sir David Thompson, who leads West Midlands police, said his force – which is still missing officers and funding after cuts – was being asked to do too much, and warned of rising crime as desperation increases in the poorest areas.
  • A child experiencing a mental health crisis had to live in a police station for two days due to a lack of psychiatric places, a chief constable has revealed, as he condemned austerity for hitting the poorest areas hardest.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Smartphone addiction linked with lower cognitive abilities, less self-control, and worse psychological well-being

PsyPost By Rachel Schepke
  • For the pre-test phase, Fabio and colleagues assessed each participant’s baseline use of their smartphone via the SocialStatsApp. For the experimental phase, participants were instructed to limit their smartphone use to one hour a day for three consecutive days.
  • Participants with higher levels of smartphone addiction spent more time using their phones in all three phases, even when they were instructed to limit their smartphone use during the experimental phase.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

‘Force of nature’: ex-rugby player Doddie Weir leaves lasting legacy, say admirers

Medical research | The Guardian By Mark Brown
  • Doddie Weir, the former Scotland and British and Irish Lions rugby union player who died over the weekend from motor neurone disease, leaves “a lasting legacy” and will, admirers said, be remembered as a man who helped transform people’s understanding of the disease.
  • Weir’s friend Jill Douglas, the broadcaster and chief executive of the My Name’5 Doddie Foundation, said Weir was someone who always wanted joy, fun and hope to be at the centre of charity’s activities.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Brexit has worsened shortage of NHS doctors, analysis shows

Health | The Guardian By Denis Campbell Health policy editor
  • Britain has 4,285 fewer European doctors than if the rising numbers who were coming before the Brexit vote in 2016 had been maintained since then, according to analysis by the Nuffield Trust health thinktank which it has shared with the Guardian.
  • Brexit has worsened the UK’s acute shortage of doctors in key areas of care and led to more than 4,000 European doctors choosing not to work in the NHS, research reveals.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

The ‘snowflake generation’ are brave to display their sensitivity | Letters

Mental health | The Guardian By Guardian Staff
  • As a 49-year-old, it seems to me that the younger generation are far more sensitive and naturally empathic than we are, leading them to experience what we would call “the normal ups and downs of life” much more intensely than we ever did.
  • It is far easier to dismiss their very intense experience of life, and make a joke of it, than it is to take courage and face the discomfort of opening our hearts to pain – theirs or our own – particularly if there’s a lot of pent-up and unacknowledged emotion bubbling away under the surface, threatening to spill over.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

We need a public inquiry into profiteering on PPE | Letters

Health | The Guardian By Guardian Staff
  • The information now emerging about Lady Mone needs to be met with a public inquiry ( Revealed: Tory peer Michelle Mone secretly received £29m from ‘VIP lane’ PPE firm, 23 November .
  • Shameful profiteering at a time of national need ( Gove under pressure to explain role in PPE deals for Mone-linked firm, 24 November ) has happened before, but then action was taken.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

No 10 hiring of healthcare lobbyist prompts privatisation concern

Health | The Guardian By Pippa Crerar Political editor
  • Rishi Sunak has appointed a private healthcare lobbyist with links to a series of controversial clients to advise him in Downing Street, raising concerns over further privatisation within the NHS.
  • Virgin Care was one when it controversially sued the NHS after losing out to a rival group of in-house NHS providers and a social enterprise firm on an £82m contract to provide children’s medical services in Surrey in 2016.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

A Brain Circuit Underpinning Locomotor Speed Control

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • By exploiting the relative accessibility of adult zebrafish, combined with a broad range of techniques, the researchers can now reveal two brain circuits that encode the start, duration and sudden change in locomotor speed.
  • Researchers at Karolinska have uncovered how brain circuits encode the start, duration and sudden change of speed of locomotion.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Ministers face pressure to explain PPE Medpro contracts decision

Health | The Guardian By Pippa Crerar Political editor
  • Ministers will come under intense pressure this week to explain how they assessed that a personal protective equipment (PPE) company linked to the Conservative peer Michelle Mone was fit to receive government contracts worth more than £200m during the pandemic.
  • The Guardian reported last week that Mone and her children secretly received £29m originating from the profits of the company, PPE Medpro, which was later transferred to a secret offshore trust.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

A New Perspective on Grieving Loss of a Pet

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • A new review published in the CABI journal Human -Animal Interactions provides counselors with new perspectives to consider in their practice when working with clients who are grieving the loss of their pet.
  • “The major goals of this review are to provide counsellors with an aspect to consider in their therapeutic work with clients dealing with grief and loss and present different factors that may impact how one grieves the loss of a pet.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

525-Million-Year-Old Fossil Defies Textbook Explanation for Brain Evolution

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • A study published in Science – led by Nicholas Strausfeld, a Regents Professor in the University of Arizona Department of Neuroscience, and Frank Hirth, a reader of evolutionary neuroscience at King’s College London – provides the first detailed description of Cardiodictyon catenulum, a wormlike animal preserved in rocks in China’s southern Yunnan province.
  • Summary: The fossil of a 525-million-year-old tiny sea creature with a preserved nervous system may solve a century-long debate about how the brains of arthropods evolved.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Woman dying of lung disease ‘caused by mould’ urges action on rogue landlords

Health | The Guardian By Robert Booth Social affairs correspondent
  • A woman with potentially terminal lung disease who claims it was due to being exposed to mould in her rented home has demanded the government empowers victims to take rogue landlords to court and “hit them in the wallet”.
  • She described how after, several years of asking her landlord politely to fix leaks causing mould in the house where she brought up two school-age children, she finally “let rip” after returning from a holiday to find it had crept up walls and curtains and across the carpet in one child’s bedroom – “a living, creepy, black mass of grossness”.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Defence training pushed recruits beyond their limits with fatal outcomes, ex-soldier tells inquiry

Mental health | The Guardian By Australian Associated Press
  • Geercke said instructors had warned recruits a study in the 1990s found every trainee suffered from mild PTSD symptoms at the end of their three-month basic training in Wagga Wagga.
  • “We started seeing a lot of self-harm,” Geercke told the inquiry on its first day of public hearings in Wagga Wagga in regional New South Wales.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Covid blood-thinner drug treatment dangerous and does not work – study

Medical research | The Guardian By Denis Campbell Health policy editor
  • Prof Charlotte Summers, the chief investigator of the trial, said: “These first findings from Heal-Covid show us that a blood-thinning drug, commonly thought to be a useful intervention in the post-hospital phase, is actually ineffective at stopping people dying or being readmitted to hospital.
  • Guidelines drawn up by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) recommend that patients in hospital with Covid are given Apixaban for 14 days, even if they are discharged during that time.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Nationwide’s rules left me unable to use my power of attorney

Health & wellbeing | The Guardian By Zoe Wood
I had to register it with their team, but they couldn’t do that because my mother’s account was closedMy mother has dementia and now lives in a care home, so I have a power of attorney (POA) to manage her finances.She had a cash Isa with Nationwide Building Society which matured in August and, despite my efforts, we have still not received the closure cheque for £15,240. This is my mother’s money and we need it to pay for her care in the medium term. Continue reading… […]Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

I always knew guzzling two litres of water a day was over the top | Emma Beddington

Health | The Guardian By Emma Beddington
  • It’s the paper suggesting public health guidelines to drink two litres of water a day are probably over the top .
  • My optician told me I had the driest eyeballs she had ever seen, a fact I have been relating with misplaced pride ever since: I imagine them like little bundles of tumbleweed, rolling dustily around my sockets (no wonder they itch).
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Scottish footballers to be banned from heading ball before and after matches

Medical research | The Guardian By Geneva Abdul
  • Clubs are also being advised to limit heading balls in training to one session a week because of the links between football and brain damage, reports the BBC.
  • The new guidance by the Scottish Football Association (SFA) comes after a landmark study revealed former professional footballers were three and a half times more likely to suffer from dementia and other serious neurological diseases.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

If the secret police had a file on you, why wouldn’t you want to see it? Ask the Germans spied on by the Stasi

Mental health | The Guardian By Laura Spinney
  • Historian Dagmar Ellerbrock, of the Technical University Dresden, and psychologist Ralph Hertwig of the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin, report that the majority of people on whom the Stasi kept files have not opened them.
  • Hertwig and Ellerbrock asked staff at the Stasi archive what proportion of people who had files consulted them.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

New collaboration investigates artificial intelligence and health care

USC News By USC News
  • The center, led by director Michael Pazzani, principal scientist at ISI, will focus on research that enables breakthroughs in ethical artificial intelligence algorithms and systems to improve health care, fight misinformation and analyze big data.
  • Sounds too good to be true, but it's a real question thanks to advancements in artificial intelligence and the work of Wael AbdAlmageed, research director at USC's Information Sciences Institute (ISI), who is using AI and facial recognition analysis to accurately predict congenital adrenal hyperplasia, a disease that causes mild facial changes.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Native American doctoral candidate focuses on policy to improve understanding of tribal sovereignty

USC News By USC News
  • As the country celebrates National Native American Heritage Month and the U.S. Supreme Court deliberates on the future of the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA), Erika Salinas, PhD candidate at the USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work, is keeping the connection to her Native community the focus of her work.
  • Native American PhD candidate focuses on policy to improve understanding of tribal sovereignty
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

What can wellness programmes teach the NHS? A sceptic’s guide to wellness – video

Medical research | The Guardian By Richard Sprenger, Noah Payne-Frank, Alex Healey and Jess James
Many people with autoimmune conditions across the UK are facing difficult decisions about funding complementary therapies. In the final episode of the series, Guardian journalist Richard Sprenger, who has multiple sclerosis, looks at how access to wellness therapies is under threat amid an acute cost of living crisis – and meets an NHS consultant in Devon championing a more progressive, integrative approach to holistic healthcareWatch more episodes of A sceptic’s guide to wellness here Continue reading… […]Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Poor countries are developing a new paradigm of mental health care. America is taking note.

Vox - Science & Health By Sigal Samuel
  • Specifically, these nations have been serving as a proving ground for a model called community-based care, where non-specialist providers or lightly trained laypeople — picture someone like your grandmother, not a doctor — deliver brief mental health interventions in informal settings like homes or parks.
  • Whereas importing Western norms can alienate local populations, who may not view mental health problems as medical, brain-based problems, community-based care has found acceptance because it pays attention to cultural context.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Monkeypox to be renamed mpox to avoid stigma, says WHO

Health | The Guardian By Nicola Davis Science correspondent
Monkeypox is to be renamed mpox in English, the World Health Organization has announced, in a bid to avoid stigmatisation.Monkeypox received its name because the virus was originally identified in monkeys kept for research in Denmark in 1958, but the disease is found in a number of animals, and most frequently in rodents.“Following a series of consultations with global experts, WHO will begin using a new preferred term ‘mpox’ as a synonym for monkeypox. Both names will be used simultaneously for one year while ‘monkeypox’ is phased out,” the UN health agency said in a statement.The disease was first […]Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Debunking fertility myths

Baylor College of Medicine Blog Network By Andrew Phifer
  • Truth: While both maternal and paternal age can be a factor in pregnancy outcomes, the female fertility window continues until menopause.
  • Truth: Studies show that effective contraception does not affect fertility, and planned pregnancies have better outcomes.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Industry-funded study of the week: a rare negative outcome

Food Politics by Marion Nestle By Marion
  • The results were contrary to our hypothesis, since we expected relative improvements in biomarkers of inflammation from the plant-based meats.
  • Abstract: Alternative plant-based meats have grown in popularity with consumers recently and researchers are examining the potential health effects, or risks, from
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

‘It makes them feel better’: skin and haircare regime a hit for ICU patients

Health | The Guardian By Tobi Thomas
  • “Nobody wants to have matted hair, or dry flaky skin,” says Trish McCready, an ICU sister at St Thomas’ who is part of the haircare initiative.
  • Wanting to do more, Wanjiro approached Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS trust’s management to ask for funding to provide specialist detangling combs, brushes, creams and other hair products that could be used on all different kinds of hair types and textures, reflecting the diversity of the hospital’s patients.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Why I will never forgive Matt Hancock | Brief letters

Health | The Guardian By Guardian Staff
  • Re Matt Hancock’s I’m a Celebrity stint and his plea for forgiveness ( Report, 27 November ), surely for him to atone for his sins of giving PPE contracts to mates and putting Covid patients into care homes for the disease to run riot, he has two options.
  • Just when I’m about to join Labour to do what I can to get the Tories out, Keir Starmer does something to put me off ( Keir Starmer rules out return of free movement between Britain and EU, 27 November ).
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Ten Minutes of Aerobic Exercise With Exposure Therapy Found to Reduce PTSD Symptoms

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • But now a study led by UNSW Sydney psychologists has found that augmenting the therapy with 10 minutes of aerobic exercise has led to patients reporting greater reduction to PTSD symptom severity six months after the nine-week treatment ended.
  • Summary: Augmenting exposure therapy with ten minutes of aerobic exercise reduces PTSD symptom severity for up to six months after a nine-week course of treatment ends.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

RECOVERY TOOLBOX: 5 ways addicts (and anyone else!) can overcome shame

The Mindful Word By Contributor
  • The underlying message is this: Life holds many moments that can inspire difficult emotions like guilt, shame, anger, resentment and disappointment, and we don’t exactly get to choose how those moments will unfold or when.
  • During this remarkable and challenging time, one of the things that helped me greatly was sharing my shame with a few trusted people—close friends I felt comfortable enough with to admit my discomfort to.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

People With Depression Are Less Likely to Have Children

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • Drawing on the unique Finnish register data, this study with over 1,4 million participants examined the associations between diagnosed depression and the likelihood of having children, the number of children, and the age at first birth for all men and women born in Finland between 1960 and 1980.
  • Women are at their greatest risk for depression during their childbearing years, and according to a recent study published in the prestigious American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, depression is indeed associated with a lower likelihood of having children among men and women.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Caffeine Gets You to the Finish Line Faster

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • However, owing to the absence of research on caffeine’s effects on sprint performance, the recommendation is reflective of evidence from other anaerobic sports rather than sprint running in athletics, like the 100-m sprint event.
  • Hashimoto, “While previous studies have investigated the effects of caffeine on running activity, evidence from these studies is not conclusive enough to support the World Athletics consensus.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

How Working Memory Provides a Link Between Perception and Anticipated Action

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • This study, now published in NeuroImage, provided the first evidence that working memory stores different types of information in flexible codes and thus provides optimal preparation for all possible courses of action.
  • Summary: Working memory stores different types of information in flexible codes which provide optimal outcomes for all possible courses of action.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Obesity Linked to Poor Brain Health in Children

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • The researchers observed structural brain changes in children with higher weight and BMI z-scores, including significant impairment to the integrity of the white matter.
  • “We know being obese as an adult is associated with poor brain health,” said researcher Simone Kaltenhauser, a post-graduate research fellow in radiology and biomedical imaging at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Urgent surgery ‘may be postponed’ by nurses’ strikes, say NHS bosses

Health | The Guardian By Denis Campbell Health policy editor
  • Both sides are expected to be able to easily agree that nurses will still work as normal to allow the delivery of some clinically important types of care on that list, such as “time sensitive” treatment that involves “immediate lifesaving or limb or organ-saving intervention”.
  • Hospitals may not be able to provide key elements of healthcare such as urgent surgery, chemotherapy and kidney dialysis during the forthcoming strikes by nurses, NHS bosses have said.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Childhood Poverty Impacts Well-Being in Middle Age

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • “ Estimating the Impact of Relative Financial Circumstances in Childhood on Adult Mental Wellbeing: a Mediation Analysis ” by Karyn Morrissey et al.
  • A new study conducted at the University of Exeter has concluded that a person’s financial circumstances in childhood were significantly linked to their sense of well-being once they reached the age bracket of 41–65.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Mom’s Dietary Fat Rewires Male and Female Brains Differently

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • In findings appearing November 28 in the journal Nature Metabolism, they found that mom’s high-fat diet triggers immune cells in the developing brains of male but not female mouse pups to overconsume the mood-influencing brain chemical serotonin, leading to depressed-like behavior.
  • Summary: Excess fat from a mother’s high-fat diet triggers immune cells to over-consume serotonin in the brains of developing males, leading to depression-like behaviors in the offspring.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Survey: Stigma, discrimination add to long-COVID hurdles

CIDRAP - COVID-19 News By Lisa Schnirring
  • People experiencing long COVID often experience job or relationship repercussions due to their condition, and many feel a sense of shame, according to new survey findings published in PLOS One .
  • Those experiencing long COVID have anecdotally reported stigma due to their conditions, but until now, little was known about how common it is.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Unique Features of Octopus Create an Entirely New Way of Designing a Nervous System

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • Now, in a new study published on November 28 in Current Biology, Hale, William Rainey Harper Professor of Organismal Biology and Vice Provost at UChicago, and her colleagues have described something new and totally unexpected about the octopus nervous system: a structure by which the intramuscular nerve cords (INCs), which help the animal sense its arm movement, connect arms on the opposite sides of the animal.
  • Summary: Researchers discovered a structure within the octopus nervous system by which the intramuscular nerve cords, which help the cephalopod to sense its arm movements, connect arms on the opposite side of the animal.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

The Green Mediterranean Diet Reduces Twice as Much Visceral Fat as the Mediterranean Diet and 10% More Than a Healthy Diet

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • The green Mediterranean diet (MED) significantly reduces visceral adipose tissue, a type of fat around internal organs that is much more dangerous than the extra “tire” around your waist.
  • “ The effect of high-polyphenol Mediterranean diet on visceral adiposity: the DIRECT PLUS randomized controlled trial ” by Hila Zelicha et al.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Scientists Capture Detailed Snapshots of Mouse Brain Cells Nibbling on Neurons

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • The Allen Institute team has mainly focused on the structures of mouse neurons, which make up slightly less than half of the cells in the dataset, said Nuno Maçarico da Costa, Ph.D., Associate Investigator at the Allen Institute for Brain Science and a co-author on the OPC study.
  • Then Buchanan, a scientist at the Allen Institute, saw something weird: a kind of brain cell she wasn’t familiar with.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

New Study Maps the Development of the 20 Most Common Psychiatric Disorders

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • “According to the study, patients with this diagnosis have a 60-percent chance of being diagnosed with a new disorder within 10 years,” says Associate Professor Terese Sara Høj Jørgensen from the Section of Social Medicine at the Department of Public Health.
  • Using Danish register data, the researchers identified psychiatric patients aged 18 years or more diagnosed with one of the 20 most common mental disorders.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Cannabis oil failed to improve pain or quality of life in palliative care cancer patients, study shows

Medical research | The Guardian By Melissa Davey
  • The trial, led by the Mater hospital and the University of Queensland, studied the effects of cannabidiol oil, also known as CBD, on the relief of pain, depression, anxiety and quality of life on 144 patients receiving palliative care for cancer.
  • “The trial found there was no detectable effect of CBD on change in physical or emotional functioning, overall quality of life, fatigue, nausea and vomiting, pain, dyspnoea or appetite loss,” lead author of the study and the director of palliative and supportive care at Mater, Prof Janet Hardy, said.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Sustainability will move into key campus space as USC increases focus on Assignment: Earth

USC News By USC News
  • "Pharmacists play an increasingly important role in community health, and the new facility will help us demonstrate that for the USC community at large," said Vassilios Papadopoulos, dean of the USC Mann School, which operates the campus pharmacy.
  • The Sustainability Hub will fill a 1,500-square-foot space that was home to one of two pharmacies on the University Park Campus operated by the USC Alfred E.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Cell Organization in the Hippocampus Matters for Memory Formation

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • Researchers in Japan have recently identified an important piece of this puzzle; in rats, fear-based memories were made when cells in the hippocampus formed discrete clusters, suggesting that memory formation requires cells to be organized in a specific arrangement.
  • The researchers had previously used the same technique to identify similar small clusters of active cells during the formation of two other kinds of hippocampal-dependent memory.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Why Silly Distractions at Work Can Actually Be Good for You

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • Professor Vera Schweitzer, researcher at WHU – Otto Beisheim School of Management, explained: “Our study shows that experiencing feelings of positivity throughout your workday can help you to remain effective ­ particularly when daily work demands require you to invest a lot of self-control, that is, regulatory resources to control your temper.
  • The research, conducted by an international team of researchers, shows that short positive interventions, such as watching a funny YouTube video, can help you to overcome daily demands like dealing with annoying emails or the tasks you dread.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

NHS cancer care to be seriously disrupted by nurses’ strike action

Health | The Guardian By Denis Campbell, Andrew Gregory and Jamie Grierson
  • RCN members have voted to strike in most hospitals and other providers of NHS care in England, Wales and Northern Ireland on those days in what union sources say is a show of strength to ministers over their claim for a pay rise of 5% above inflation.
  • Pat Cullen, the RCN general secretary, said on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme on Friday that “services such as oncology will be derogated or exempt from any strike action” but added that it was too soon to specify if services such as scans and other checks would stop or proceed.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Does solitude equate to loneliness?

Peter Attia By Peter Attia
  • The general consensus among these studies is that, despite the fact that the percentage of the American population living alone has, on average, been steadily increasing since the early 1900s, loneliness has not.
  • Especially eye-catching is the rapid increase in time spent alone after the age of forty, and beyond our early sixties, we spend, on average, more than seven waking hours alone.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Twins study finds no appreciable effect of parenting on motivation of early adolescents to attend school and learn

PsyPost By Vladimir Hedrih
  • An analysis of the data from a large study of German twins ( TwinLife ) found no support for the notion that parental control, parental activities and extracurricular activities affect the development of noncognitive skills of early adolescents (10-14 years of age).
  • To study the effects of parenting on early adolescents, professor Michael Grätz from the Institute of Social Sciences of the University of Lausanne in Switzerland and his colleagues analyzed a part of data from TwinLIfe, a large German panel of twins and their families.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

It’s a colorless, toxic gas. A US woman won $363m after years of exposure

Health | The Guardian By Mario Koran
  • The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) says that the greatest cancer risk is for people who have lived near a facility that has released EtO into the air for many years.
  • It was only in 2018 that the Willowbrook community learned of the possible danger, when government officials published a report indicating residents living near the Sterigenics facility faced elevated risks of cancer and discharge from the facility.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

New longitudinal research highlights how grave the effects of childhood trauma can be for anxiety and depression

PsyPost By Emily Manis
  • Thus, understanding whether individuals with childhood trauma could be more vulnerable to developing specific symptoms of affective disorders was inconclusive,” Erika Kuzminskaite and colleagues wrote in their study.
  • A study published in the Journal of Affective Disorders explores how childhood trauma impacts specific aspects of depression and anxiety over time.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

People with a weak future time perspective are more likely to engage in bedtime procrastination

PsyPost By Eric W. Dolan
  • The study was based on Temporal Self-regulation Theory, which suggests that people are more likely to engage in goal-oriented behavior when they have a strong future time perspective.
  • The researchers found that more future-oriented students tended to exhibit higher levels of self-control and lower levels of impulsivity, which in turn was associated with reduced bedtime procrastination.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Mother of London firefighter who killed himself welcomes damning report

Mental health | The Guardian By Diane Taylor
  • Speaking exclusively to the Guardian, Francois said: “When Jaden completed his firefighter training he was proud to be wearing his uniform, but within a short time the London fire brigade had “completely destroyed him”.
  • While she said that the commissioner had always been supportive and had told her repeatedly that the fire service must be held accountable for what had happened to her son, Francois said she had encountered some hostility from firefighters, especially around the time of her son’s inquest, with denials that racism or bullying existed in LFB posted on social media.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Study of families finds evidence of intergenerational transmission of Dark Triad traits and emotional reactivity

PsyPost By Laura Staloch
  • The research team sought to discover if the Dark Triad and emotional reactivity of the parent’s generation can transmit these personality traits and behaviors to their offspring.
  • A recent study published in Psychology Research and Behavior Management attempts to determine the relationship between parental Dark Triad traits, emotional reactivity, and their children’s Dark Triad and emotional reactivity.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Why Certain Types of Music Make Our Brains Sing, and Others Don’t

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • In a study published in the Journal of Neuroscience in September 2021, we show that similar prediction mechanisms are happening in the brain every time we listen to music, whithout us being necessarly conscious of it.
  • For instance, in those studies, music notes that were less accurately predicted led to emotions with greater psychological activation.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

What Octopus and Human Brains Have in Common

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • In a paper published in “ Science Advances ”, they explain that octopuses possess a massively expanded repertoire of microRNAs (miRNAs) in their neural tissue – reflecting similar developments that occurred in vertebrates.
  • The most interesting discovery was in fact the dramatic expansion of a well-known group of RNA genes, microRNAs. A total of 42 novel miRNA families were found – specifically in neural tissue and mostly in the brain.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Educational Background and Previous Brain Injury May Be Associated With Higher Risk of Frontotemporal Dementia

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • Two recent studies from the University of Eastern Finland show that educational background and previous traumatic brain injury may potentially affect the risk of frontotemporal dementia.
  • According to a recent study conducted at the University of Eastern Finland, patients with frontotemporal dementia were, on average, less educated than patients with Alzheimer’s disease.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Nurses across UK to strike for first time on 15 and 20 December

Health | The Guardian By Andrew Gregory and Jamie Grierson
  • Earlier this month, the RCN announced that nursing staff at the majority of NHS employers across the UK had voted to take strike action over pay and patient safety.
  • Nurses across the UK will go on strike for the first time over two days in the fortnight before Christmas after ministers rejected their pleas for formal talks over NHS pay.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Health secretary Steve Barclay insists nurses getting ‘fair’ pay rise as strike dates announced – UK politics live

Health | The Guardian By Andrew Sparrow
  • Trust leaders will do “everything in their power to minimise disruption for patients” during the nursing strike, a health leader said.
  • I have to say that today is a very, very sad day because it really indicates that for the first time in its 100-year history, the Royal College of Nursing is now engaging in industrial action.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

I’m done saying sorry for being deaf – I want to change how society treats people like me | Liam O’Dell

Health | The Guardian By Liam O'Dell
  • It usually does, and we’re soon fumbling for another way to communicate, but isn’t it troubling that the oh-so British institution of politeness extends to deaf people apologising for the very inaccessibility that discriminates against them?
  • But ultimately, more work has to be done by hearing and non-disabled people to remove these barriers so I don’t have to feel bad about asking for something to be repeated, or have to ask for conversations to move towards accessible formats such as written communication.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Daughter’s graduation inspires USC Marshall online master’s student

USC News By USC News
  • After watching her now-21-year-old daughter graduate from high school, Austin was inspired to pursue a Bachelor of Science in Applied Management from Grand Canyon University and -- soon after -- her Master of Science in Global Supply Chain Management (MSGSCM) from USC Marshall School of Business.
  • Inspired by Daughter's Graduation, USC Marshall Student Joins Online Master's Program
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Rishi Sunak switches priorities to sealing up holes in a sinking ship

NHS | The Guardian By Jessica Elgot Deputy political editor
  • Sunak has suggested to MPs who have seen him recently that he has three main priorities for his premiership: stabilising the economy, tackling small boat crossings in the Channel, and easing the pressures on the NHS .
  • For the most part, he is acting like a prime minister who has grasped that he is likely to have just two years in No 10 and precious little time to build a legacy other than sealing up some holes in a sinking boat.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

New research pinpoints why makeup makes female faces look more attractive

PsyPost By Vladimir Hedrih
  • Our research sought to narrow down the range of possible explanations, by investigating which factors of facial beauty are responsible for the effect of makeup on attractiveness,” said study author Richard Russell, a professor of psychology at Gettysburg College.
  • A series of six studies on students of Gettysburg college found that faces with makeup were seen as more attractive, more symmetrical, more feminine, healthier, and more similar to faces of typical women than the same faces without makeup.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Universal flu vaccine may be available within two years, says scientist

Health | The Guardian By Ian Sample Science editor
  • Researchers have been working on universal flu vaccines for more than a decade, but the latest breakthrough, published in Science, is seen as a major step towards a jab that could help protect humans from a potentially devastating flu pandemic.
  • An experimental vaccine based on the same mRNA technology used in the highly successful Covid jabs was found to protect mice and ferrets against severe influenza, paving the way for clinical trials in humans.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Woman with Down’s syndrome loses court of appeal abortion law case

Health | The Guardian By Matthew Weaver
  • They said: “The court recognises that many people with Down’s syndrome and other disabilities will be upset and offended by the fact that a diagnosis of serious disability during pregnancy is treated by the law as a justification for termination, and that they may regard it as implying that their own lives are of lesser value.
  • Heidi Crowter, who brought the case alongside Máire Lea-Wilson, whose son Aidan also has Down’s syndrome, had argued that allowing pregnancy terminations up to birth if the foetus has the condition is discriminatory and stigmatises disabled people.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Eye-tracking study suggests that negative comments on social media are more attention-grabbing than positive comments

PsyPost By Beth Ellwood
  • When it comes to reading news stories on social media, new psychology findings suggest that people pay more attention to negative comments than positive ones.
  • Study author Susann Kohout and her colleagues designed an eye-tracking study to investigate the extent that people pay attention to and remember emotional content on social media.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Rishi Sunak says nurses’ pay rise is ‘obviously unaffordable’ – video

NHS | The Guardian
UK prime minister says that while he has ‘enormous respect’ for nurses, the pay rise their union is demanding is ‘obviously unaffordable’. The government says the Royal College ofNursingis seeking a pay increase that would in effect be worth 19%, costing £10bn. The RCN says it does not recognise these figures. Its members will strike in England, Wales and Northern Ireland – the first strike in its 106-year history – on 15 and 20 DecemberUK politics: latest updatesNurses across UK to strike for first time on 15 and 20 December Continue reading… […]Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Poor Awaab Ishak died of mould in his home. Take it from me, this tragedy could happen again | Richard Blakeway

Health | The Guardian By Richard Blakeway
  • This cumulative impact causes profound distress for the residents whose cases I investigate as housing ombudsman, but for Awaab it led to a preventable tragedy.
  • In the aftermath of the terrible revelations about Awaab Ishak, and the horror of a two-year-old boy dying from exposure to mould in his home, referrals of cases to me have leapt by 33%.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Care for UK’s most vulnerable faces ‘collapse’ as providers count cost

Health | The Guardian By Patrick Butler Social policy editor
  • Charities and not-for-profit firms have poured millions of pounds of reserves into propping up the supposedly taxpayer-funded services they provide under contract to councils and the NHS.
  • One provider said it was difficult to hire staff because council contracts effectively capped the amount they could pay in wages at a market rate way below that currently being offered by rivals like Aldi and Tesco.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Breakfast with a slice of sobering reality | Brief letters

Health | The Guardian By Guardian Staff
  • Reading in recent days about parents skipping meals as a way of eking out meagre household income has been sobering, but had none of the immediacy of Jennings’ image and the desperate impact of the child’s words: “Dad – when will I be grown up enough to not need dinner any more, like you?”
  • Sitting down to breakfast, I turned to the letters page and caught sight of Ben Jennings’ powerful cartoon ( 24 November ).
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

PPE Medpro declines to say how it would repay millions if told to do so

Health | The Guardian By David Conn
  • The Guardian reported this week that leaked documents indicated that Mone and her children secretly received £29m originating from the profits on these contracts after her support helped the company, PPE Medpro, secure a place in the “VIP lane” that the government used during the Covid pandemic to prioritise firms with political connections.
  • The leaked documents, which were compiled by HSBC, show PPE Medpro paid at least £65m in profits to Mone’s husband, the Isle of Man-based financier Douglas Barrowman, just months after securing the contracts.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

BEACONS OF HOPE: Planting seeds from Hiroshima

The Mindful Word By Emily L Quint Freeman
  • My neighbourhood in London wanted to participate by obtaining some seeds to germinate and grow, which would then hopefully be planted and cared for in our local park.
  • After the blast, the trees in Hiroshima looked like charcoal and people feared that it would be 75 years before anything grew near the epicentre.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Protein Shapes Could Indicate Parkinson’s Disease

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • ETH Zurich researchers have found that a set of proteins have different shapes in the spinal fluid of healthy individuals and Parkinson’s patients.
  • What makes this study special is that while the potential biomarker proteins are found in both healthy and diseased individuals, their molecules are present in different shapes (or structures) in each of the two groups.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Older Adults Live Longer in Counties With Greater Age Bias

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • Older adults living in counties with greater age bias had better health outcomes than those living in areas with less age bias, according to University of Massachusetts Amherst researchers, who were surprised at the findings.
  • They found that greater explicit age bias also was associated with lower death rates among young and middle-aged adults in those counties, suggesting that any health benefits of living in ageist communities may begin to accrue in earlier life.
Read more >Similar articles >
Post image

Essential Signaling Pathway for Neuronal Connectivity During Brain Development Identified

Neuroscience News By Neuroscience News
  • New research from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King’s College London has demonstrated that brain wiring requires the control of local protein synthesis at the level of specific synapse types.
  • We identified a signaling pathway that controls protein synthesis in one of the most fundamental connections in the cerebral cortex, the synapses made by pyramidal cells on parvalbumin interneurons,” says Dr. Clémence Bernard, the first author of the study from King’s IoPPN.
Read more >Similar articles >